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Bobcat
April 13th 04, 05:14 PM
At our place, four-year-old Emily chases and sometimes scratches newcomer
Sophie, probably out of jealousy at no longer being the centre of the
household universe. If we're nearby we use the spritz bottle to let her know
it's not acceptable behaviour and she dashes off, a little damp but not
soaked. Fifteen minutes later all this has drained from her little random
access memory chip, and she returns to have her ears and back stroked. We
think our warnings have modified her aggression somewhat, but it's a long,
slow process. And the tables are gradually turning. Sophie's not afraid of
Emily. She's growing larger (we got her as a small kitten), and she's
improving the use of her pointy weapons. Can any of you out there counsel
us, based on similar experience?

Karen
April 13th 04, 05:54 PM
I keep toys nearby to distract as soon as stuff like this happens, or
covered bowls of crunchies that I can whip out and give them a treat. If
said behavior happens again, I put agressor in time out for a while. It
seems to have helped a lot between Pearl and Grant or even Pearl chasing
Sugar. I can even sometimes just put Pearl in the bedroom (time out) without
closing the door and she will get up in the cat napper and and chill on her
own. Time out seems to work really well. It's not much "punishment" with a
big window, cat tree, cat napper, bed, food and a litter box, but it is
"away". So, I don't feel bad about it and whether its Grant stalking Pearl
(though usually it is Pearl stalking Grant). After a break of about 20
minutes to a half hour, they will then studiously ignore each other for the
most part. Main thing is to BE CONSISTENT with both cats.

Karen

"Bobcat" > wrote in message
.. .
> At our place, four-year-old Emily chases and sometimes scratches newcomer
> Sophie, probably out of jealousy at no longer being the centre of the
> household universe. If we're nearby we use the spritz bottle to let her
know
> it's not acceptable behaviour and she dashes off, a little damp but not
> soaked. Fifteen minutes later all this has drained from her little random
> access memory chip, and she returns to have her ears and back stroked. We
> think our warnings have modified her aggression somewhat, but it's a long,
> slow process. And the tables are gradually turning. Sophie's not afraid of
> Emily. She's growing larger (we got her as a small kitten), and she's
> improving the use of her pointy weapons. Can any of you out there counsel
> us, based on similar experience?
>
>

Karen
April 13th 04, 05:54 PM
I keep toys nearby to distract as soon as stuff like this happens, or
covered bowls of crunchies that I can whip out and give them a treat. If
said behavior happens again, I put agressor in time out for a while. It
seems to have helped a lot between Pearl and Grant or even Pearl chasing
Sugar. I can even sometimes just put Pearl in the bedroom (time out) without
closing the door and she will get up in the cat napper and and chill on her
own. Time out seems to work really well. It's not much "punishment" with a
big window, cat tree, cat napper, bed, food and a litter box, but it is
"away". So, I don't feel bad about it and whether its Grant stalking Pearl
(though usually it is Pearl stalking Grant). After a break of about 20
minutes to a half hour, they will then studiously ignore each other for the
most part. Main thing is to BE CONSISTENT with both cats.

Karen

"Bobcat" > wrote in message
.. .
> At our place, four-year-old Emily chases and sometimes scratches newcomer
> Sophie, probably out of jealousy at no longer being the centre of the
> household universe. If we're nearby we use the spritz bottle to let her
know
> it's not acceptable behaviour and she dashes off, a little damp but not
> soaked. Fifteen minutes later all this has drained from her little random
> access memory chip, and she returns to have her ears and back stroked. We
> think our warnings have modified her aggression somewhat, but it's a long,
> slow process. And the tables are gradually turning. Sophie's not afraid of
> Emily. She's growing larger (we got her as a small kitten), and she's
> improving the use of her pointy weapons. Can any of you out there counsel
> us, based on similar experience?
>
>