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Igor Schein
June 7th 04, 08:50 PM
Hi,

First of all - sorry for cross-posting, I am not sure which of the 3
groups is the most appropriate. I am looking to get a cat for my
grandparents. I like Persian, Himalayan and Exotic. However, I am
looking to spend much less than breeders usually charge for
purebloods, since I am not so concern about purity and I am not
thinking shows. My priorities are health, looks (has to look the way
these 3 breeds usually look) and personality. So if it's an
interbreed, it's OK for me. I am not sure if shelters or pet stores
would have something like that. Maybe there's a market for breeding
rejects, where I can get one of them for under $200?

I appreciate any help on this subject

Thanks

Igor

June 7th 04, 09:01 PM
On 7 Jun 2004 12:50:03 -0700, (Igor Schein) wrote:

>Hi,
>
>First of all - sorry for cross-posting, I am not sure which of the 3
>groups is the most appropriate. I am looking to get a cat for my
>grandparents. I like Persian, Himalayan and Exotic. However, I am
>looking to spend much less than breeders usually charge for
>purebloods, since I am not so concern about purity and I am not
>thinking shows. My priorities are health, looks (has to look the way
>these 3 breeds usually look) and personality. So if it's an
>interbreed, it's OK for me. I am not sure if shelters or pet stores
>would have something like that. Maybe there's a market for breeding
>rejects, where I can get one of them for under $200?
>
>I appreciate any help on this subject
>
>Thanks
>
>Igor
Igor:
My $0.02

I think that a better thing to do would be to take your
grandparents down to the local shelter and let the cat choose them if
they really want a cat.
You could pay all the costs and then there would be a good match
between your grandparents and the cat.
Every one will be happy.

June 7th 04, 09:01 PM
On 7 Jun 2004 12:50:03 -0700, (Igor Schein) wrote:

>Hi,
>
>First of all - sorry for cross-posting, I am not sure which of the 3
>groups is the most appropriate. I am looking to get a cat for my
>grandparents. I like Persian, Himalayan and Exotic. However, I am
>looking to spend much less than breeders usually charge for
>purebloods, since I am not so concern about purity and I am not
>thinking shows. My priorities are health, looks (has to look the way
>these 3 breeds usually look) and personality. So if it's an
>interbreed, it's OK for me. I am not sure if shelters or pet stores
>would have something like that. Maybe there's a market for breeding
>rejects, where I can get one of them for under $200?
>
>I appreciate any help on this subject
>
>Thanks
>
>Igor
Igor:
My $0.02

I think that a better thing to do would be to take your
grandparents down to the local shelter and let the cat choose them if
they really want a cat.
You could pay all the costs and then there would be a good match
between your grandparents and the cat.
Every one will be happy.

MaryL
June 7th 04, 09:33 PM
"Igor Schein" > wrote in message
om...
> Hi,
>
> First of all - sorry for cross-posting, I am not sure which of the 3
> groups is the most appropriate. I am looking to get a cat for my
> grandparents. I like Persian, Himalayan and Exotic. However, I am
> looking to spend much less than breeders usually charge for
> purebloods, since I am not so concern about purity and I am not
> thinking shows. My priorities are health, looks (has to look the way
> these 3 breeds usually look) and personality. So if it's an
> interbreed, it's OK for me. I am not sure if shelters or pet stores
> would have something like that. Maybe there's a market for breeding
> rejects, where I can get one of them for under $200?
>
> I appreciate any help on this subject
>
> Thanks
>
> Igor

It would be much better to let your grandparents select the cat themselves
(or let the cat "select them"). Shelters often do have cats with the looks
you described, but it is much more important to concentrate on temperament
and personality. A good place to start would be to go to www.petfinder.com.
This will give you a "preview" of what is available from shelters and rescue
groups in your area (but there are usually many more cats available than
what you see online -- just use that as a starting place). You will find a
wide variety of cats and kittens, and you will be saving the life of a cat
that might otherwise be euthanized by adopting through a shelter instead of
buying from a breeder. There are also some rescue groups that specialize in
rescuing and then adopting out cats of a specific breed -- often cats that
have been abandoned or turned in to shelters.

I do want to repeat, though, that your grandparents should select their own
cat. It is very important that they adopt a cat that *they* want because
they are the people who will live with and care for the cat.

MaryL

MaryL
June 7th 04, 09:33 PM
"Igor Schein" > wrote in message
om...
> Hi,
>
> First of all - sorry for cross-posting, I am not sure which of the 3
> groups is the most appropriate. I am looking to get a cat for my
> grandparents. I like Persian, Himalayan and Exotic. However, I am
> looking to spend much less than breeders usually charge for
> purebloods, since I am not so concern about purity and I am not
> thinking shows. My priorities are health, looks (has to look the way
> these 3 breeds usually look) and personality. So if it's an
> interbreed, it's OK for me. I am not sure if shelters or pet stores
> would have something like that. Maybe there's a market for breeding
> rejects, where I can get one of them for under $200?
>
> I appreciate any help on this subject
>
> Thanks
>
> Igor

It would be much better to let your grandparents select the cat themselves
(or let the cat "select them"). Shelters often do have cats with the looks
you described, but it is much more important to concentrate on temperament
and personality. A good place to start would be to go to www.petfinder.com.
This will give you a "preview" of what is available from shelters and rescue
groups in your area (but there are usually many more cats available than
what you see online -- just use that as a starting place). You will find a
wide variety of cats and kittens, and you will be saving the life of a cat
that might otherwise be euthanized by adopting through a shelter instead of
buying from a breeder. There are also some rescue groups that specialize in
rescuing and then adopting out cats of a specific breed -- often cats that
have been abandoned or turned in to shelters.

I do want to repeat, though, that your grandparents should select their own
cat. It is very important that they adopt a cat that *they* want because
they are the people who will live with and care for the cat.

MaryL

Sunflower
June 8th 04, 12:56 AM
Most reputable breeders or rescue groups WILL NOT do a gift adoption. The
liklihood of the new owners being pleased with an animal that they have not
themselves chosen is slim, and these gifts usually end up at a shelter. Let
your grandparents pick their own pet. If you MUST, give them a gift
certificate redeemable at a local shelter and arrange transportation for
them. BTW, are you aware of how much WORK owning a long haired cat can be?
Daily brushings may be too much for hands that are losing their flexibility.
Most seniors want to simplify their lives, not complicate them with 20 more
years of responsibility for a living being. Consider a rescue group devoted
to senior cats. These animals have a hard time finding homes, and it would
be a good thing to find a match for all concerned.

Sunflower
June 8th 04, 12:56 AM
Most reputable breeders or rescue groups WILL NOT do a gift adoption. The
liklihood of the new owners being pleased with an animal that they have not
themselves chosen is slim, and these gifts usually end up at a shelter. Let
your grandparents pick their own pet. If you MUST, give them a gift
certificate redeemable at a local shelter and arrange transportation for
them. BTW, are you aware of how much WORK owning a long haired cat can be?
Daily brushings may be too much for hands that are losing their flexibility.
Most seniors want to simplify their lives, not complicate them with 20 more
years of responsibility for a living being. Consider a rescue group devoted
to senior cats. These animals have a hard time finding homes, and it would
be a good thing to find a match for all concerned.

kaeli
June 8th 04, 02:16 PM
In article >,
enlightened us with...
> Hi,
>
> First of all - sorry for cross-posting, I am not sure which of the 3
> groups is the most appropriate. I am looking to get a cat for my
> grandparents. I like Persian, Himalayan and Exotic. However, I am
> looking to spend much less than breeders usually charge for
> purebloods, since I am not so concern about purity and I am not
> thinking shows.

I'm not sure where you live, but in the States, there are lots and lots
of breed-specific rescues. Why not adopt from one if there's one in your
area?

--
--
~kaeli~
He often broke into song because he couldn't find the key.
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace

kaeli
June 8th 04, 02:16 PM
In article >,
enlightened us with...
> Hi,
>
> First of all - sorry for cross-posting, I am not sure which of the 3
> groups is the most appropriate. I am looking to get a cat for my
> grandparents. I like Persian, Himalayan and Exotic. However, I am
> looking to spend much less than breeders usually charge for
> purebloods, since I am not so concern about purity and I am not
> thinking shows.

I'm not sure where you live, but in the States, there are lots and lots
of breed-specific rescues. Why not adopt from one if there's one in your
area?

--
--
~kaeli~
He often broke into song because he couldn't find the key.
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace