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View Full Version : Cats and getting on counter and tables -- healthy???


Ringo Langly
November 9th 04, 03:14 PM
Hi,

A friend of mine moved in (first roommate in years), and with her came
two cats -- both boys, both fixed with front claws removed, one about
18 months (part simese part something else -- crosseyed) and one about
5 years old (calico and something else). Also my place is rather
large, but we keep the bedroom and bathroom doors shut when not home
so the cats don't roam where they shouldn't.

I'm generally not an animal person and never had a cat, but I figured
I'd give it a try. She and the cats moved in about 2 months ago, and
the issues I thought I'd have (cat box, smell, etc) are not issues at
all since she keeps the litter pan cleaned out and it's tucked back in
the laundry room. THe problem is the cats get on the kitchen
counters, tables, and all over the place where I didn't figure they'd
go. How healthy is this? With their paws in the litter pan then on
the counters do they track stuff everyplace? Also when cats sit do
their butts touch the counter or whatever they're on?

Sorry for the crazy questions, but though my roommate grew-up with
cats, she couldn't answer these questions. The cats get on the
counters and tables we use to fix food on and eat on, and though I've
made it a habit to clean everything before preparing foods or eating,
it just kind of grosses me out a bit. I'm generally a clean freak :)

Thanks for any info or suggestions... I'd prefer the cats didn't get
on the counters and tables at all - and they generally don't when
we're home - but I was off yesterday and noticed everytime I walked
into the kitchen they were lounging up there. I sprayed them with
water, tapped their head (not hard or anything), and said NO... but
didn't work.

Thanks again, and take care,

Ringo

Bill Stock
November 9th 04, 03:31 PM
"Ringo Langly" > wrote in message
om...
> Hi,
>
> A friend of mine moved in (first roommate in years), and with her came
> two cats -- both boys, both fixed with front claws removed, one about
> 18 months (part simese part something else -- crosseyed) and one about
> 5 years old (calico and something else). Also my place is rather
> large, but we keep the bedroom and bathroom doors shut when not home
> so the cats don't roam where they shouldn't.
>
> I'm generally not an animal person and never had a cat, but I figured
> I'd give it a try. She and the cats moved in about 2 months ago, and
> the issues I thought I'd have (cat box, smell, etc) are not issues at
> all since she keeps the litter pan cleaned out and it's tucked back in
> the laundry room. THe problem is the cats get on the kitchen
> counters, tables, and all over the place where I didn't figure they'd
> go. How healthy is this? With their paws in the litter pan then on
> the counters do they track stuff everyplace? Also when cats sit do
> their butts touch the counter or whatever they're on?
>
> Sorry for the crazy questions, but though my roommate grew-up with
> cats, she couldn't answer these questions. The cats get on the
> counters and tables we use to fix food on and eat on, and though I've
> made it a habit to clean everything before preparing foods or eating,
> it just kind of grosses me out a bit. I'm generally a clean freak :)
>
> Thanks for any info or suggestions... I'd prefer the cats didn't get
> on the counters and tables at all - and they generally don't when
> we're home - but I was off yesterday and noticed everytime I walked
> into the kitchen they were lounging up there. I sprayed them with
> water, tapped their head (not hard or anything), and said NO... but
> didn't work.

I would not recommend it.

Just put the cats down when you see them on the counter and say NO! It
worked for our cat Cali, who learned to jump up when we weren't looking. :)
Now she's too old to jump up and the young one rarely jumps on the table.

I believe a squirt bottle or tinfoil on the table are effective deterrents.

BudGan25
November 9th 04, 04:08 PM
Barb wrote:

> I have read that when children are raised with cats or dogs they generally
> are healthier than when they are not. No one is healthier living in a germ
> proof environment anyway. Plus, there is no such thing unless you have to
> live in a bubble. My cats are all over the place. I do not put food
> directly on the counters or tables, always on plates or a cutting board. If
> I were you I would try to accept this because as you said the cats will be
> on the counters when you are not home.
>
> --
> Barb
> Of course I don't look busy,
> I did it right the first time.
>
>
Exactly. They will go where they want when you're not there anyway.
I usually make sure I clean the table or counters before eating or
preparing food. In 3.5 years with my two cats, there hasn't been any
sanitary issues in my house.

Barb
November 9th 04, 04:29 PM
I have read that when children are raised with cats or dogs they generally
are healthier than when they are not. No one is healthier living in a germ
proof environment anyway. Plus, there is no such thing unless you have to
live in a bubble. My cats are all over the place. I do not put food
directly on the counters or tables, always on plates or a cutting board. If
I were you I would try to accept this because as you said the cats will be
on the counters when you are not home.

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.

Mary
November 9th 04, 05:00 PM
"Ringo Langly" > wrote in message
om...
>
> Thanks for any info or suggestions... I'd prefer the cats didn't get on
the counters and tables at all

The only time my cats get on the counters is when I am
not looking. How do I know? Because I have never seen them on the counters
and tables. (I would have said they never get on
the counters but someone here pointed out that they do, just when I am not
looking!) I say NO loudly and clap loudly and essentially lunge at them
fromt he first day they are in the house, every time they try it. Talk to
your room mate and have her do the same thing. It works. (They may get up
there, but I never see any sign of it--no hair, footprints, chewed plants,
etc.)

Mary
November 9th 04, 05:07 PM
"Barb" > wrote in message
erio.net...

>If
> I were you I would try to accept this because as you said the cats will be
> on the counters when you are not home.
>

I don't think the OP needs to just accept it. For every cat owner whose
cats are all over the counters there are two with cats that generally
do not do this. The OP has taken these cats and their owner into
his home, and he does not like cats all over the counters. I don't like
it either, and it does not happen as far as I can tell. (I let mine roam the
house when I am away, but he shuts his cats up, so the chances of them
doing it when he is not there are slimmer.) Persistance in saying "NO!" and
putting (or shooing) them down works. My counters are clean and nobody
ever finds hair in the food, so it is working. I should add that my cats
have
all been adults when I adopted them, so adults can be trained.

kaeli
November 9th 04, 05:11 PM
In article >,
enlightened us with...
>
> Sorry for the crazy questions, but though my roommate grew-up with
> cats, she couldn't answer these questions. The cats get on the
> counters and tables we use to fix food on and eat on, and though I've
> made it a habit to clean everything before preparing foods or eating,
> it just kind of grosses me out a bit. I'm generally a clean freak :)
>

Don't be a baby. If you knew how much was on your hands, clothing, bedding,
and carpet, you'd stop worrying about the cats or drop dead from shock. One
of the two. ;)

/ You posted that greenlit thread about cat butts on Fark, didn't you?

--
--
~kaeli~
The Bible contains six admonishments to homosexuals and
three hundred sixty-two admonishments to heterosexuals.
That doesn't mean that God doesn't love heterosexuals. It's
just that they need more supervision.
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace

Ringo Langly
November 9th 04, 06:43 PM
"Bill Stock" > wrote in message >...
> "Ringo Langly" > wrote in message
> om...
> > Hi,
> >
> > A friend of mine moved in (first roommate in years), and with her came
> > two cats -- both boys, both fixed with front claws removed, one about
> > 18 months (part simese part something else -- crosseyed) and one about
> > 5 years old (calico and something else). Also my place is rather
> > large, but we keep the bedroom and bathroom doors shut when not home
> > so the cats don't roam where they shouldn't.
> > [snip]
>
> I would not recommend it.
>
> Just put the cats down when you see them on the counter and say NO! It
> worked for our cat Cali, who learned to jump up when we weren't looking. :)
> Now she's too old to jump up and the young one rarely jumps on the table.
>
> I believe a squirt bottle or tinfoil on the table are effective deterrents.

Hi Bill,

I never thought about putting tinfoil or the squirt bottle on the
counter. They have learned to run when we even lift the bottle, so
that might actually work.

Thanks for the suggestion!

Ringo

Ringo Langly
November 9th 04, 06:47 PM
"Barb" > wrote in message . net>...
> I have read that when children are raised with cats or dogs they generally
> are healthier than when they are not. No one is healthier living in a germ
> proof environment anyway. Plus, there is no such thing unless you have to
> live in a bubble. My cats are all over the place. I do not put food
> directly on the counters or tables, always on plates or a cutting board. If
> I were you I would try to accept this because as you said the cats will be
> on the counters when you are not home.

Hi Barb,

I don't generally put food directly on the counter, but I'd like to
think if something falls on the counter, whether a spoon or bit of
food, that it's not covered in the same germs in the kitty pan. I
don't want to treat my counters and tables at home like I treat tables
at restaurantes where if something touches it it's to be avoided.

My habit is to use Lysol disinfectant spray on the counters almost
daily, whether cooking or not. I was just wondering what others do to
either train the cats to not jump on the counters or what they do to
disuade the cats from doing it. I've heard of a spray you can use
that cats don't like -- one friend called it 'anti-catnip' because the
smell or something in it cats can't stand. Any idea what this is?

THanks again,

Ringo

Mary
November 9th 04, 06:53 PM
"Ringo Langly" > wrote

> They have learned to run when we even lift the bottle, so
> that might actually work.
>

See, they can be trained!

rinn
November 9th 04, 07:44 PM
they're going to get up there no matter what. I keep a bottle of clorox
wipes on my kitchen counter and use those whenever I start preparing a meal.

"Ringo Langly" > wrote in message
om...
> Hi,
>
> A friend of mine moved in (first roommate in years), and with her came
> two cats -- both boys, both fixed with front claws removed, one about
> 18 months (part simese part something else -- crosseyed) and one about
> 5 years old (calico and something else). Also my place is rather
> large, but we keep the bedroom and bathroom doors shut when not home
> so the cats don't roam where they shouldn't.
>
> I'm generally not an animal person and never had a cat, but I figured
> I'd give it a try. She and the cats moved in about 2 months ago, and
> the issues I thought I'd have (cat box, smell, etc) are not issues at
> all since she keeps the litter pan cleaned out and it's tucked back in
> the laundry room. THe problem is the cats get on the kitchen
> counters, tables, and all over the place where I didn't figure they'd
> go. How healthy is this? With their paws in the litter pan then on
> the counters do they track stuff everyplace? Also when cats sit do
> their butts touch the counter or whatever they're on?
>
> Sorry for the crazy questions, but though my roommate grew-up with
> cats, she couldn't answer these questions. The cats get on the
> counters and tables we use to fix food on and eat on, and though I've
> made it a habit to clean everything before preparing foods or eating,
> it just kind of grosses me out a bit. I'm generally a clean freak :)
>
> Thanks for any info or suggestions... I'd prefer the cats didn't get
> on the counters and tables at all - and they generally don't when
> we're home - but I was off yesterday and noticed everytime I walked
> into the kitchen they were lounging up there. I sprayed them with
> water, tapped their head (not hard or anything), and said NO... but
> didn't work.
>
> Thanks again, and take care,
>
> Ringo

kaeli
November 9th 04, 07:52 PM
In article >,
enlightened us with...
>
> "Barb" > wrote in message
> erio.net...
>
> >If
> > I were you I would try to accept this because as you said the cats will be
> > on the counters when you are not home.
> >
>
> I don't think the OP needs to just accept it. For every cat owner whose
> cats are all over the counters there are two with cats that generally
> do not do this.

Who do not do this _in front of them_.
Or, maybe they're just lazy cats.
I have one who insists on climbing all over my shelves despite my not being
very pleased about it. The other two just don't find it all that
entertaining.

> The OP has taken these cats and their owner into
> his home, and he does not like cats all over the counters. I don't like
> it either, and it does not happen as far as I can tell.

Yeah, that's what my mom said about the cat going on tables...until she got a
glass table. She could actually SEE the paw prints on the glass.

Some cats are easily deterred from things like tinfoil or squirt bottles and
never bother to try going up there again. Others will always find a way when
your back is turned. The minute you take the foil off, they're up there
again.
MOST cats can be trained to stay off things (that is, they just don't really
bother to go up there any more). Others you'll need to use avoidance stuff
(like the tinfoil or a scat mat) forever - or until they're too old to jump
that high.

My 3 cats EAT and DRINK on the counter (their food is up there to keep it out
of reach of the dog) and I don't find cat hair in my food. So, don't take the
finding of hair or general cleanliness to be all that indicative. Cats are
naturally pretty clean animals.

--
--
~kaeli~
Does the name Pavlov ring a bell?
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace

ceb
November 9th 04, 08:19 PM
kaeli > wrote in
:

> Who do not do this _in front of them_.
> Or, maybe they're just lazy cats.
> I have one who insists on climbing all over my shelves despite my not
> being very pleased about it. The other two just don't find it all that
> entertaining.
>

Some cats aren't really climbers. Rosie has been really slow to get up on
anything including chairs, though she is doing this more recently, and
she has never shown any interest in either the kitchen counter or the
table. I think maybe she would feel too exposed up there. She is formerly
feral, though, so not typical of the average confident raised-from-a-
kitten cat... also, although she's been living with me for 8 months or
so, I think she still has personality elements that have not blossomed
fully and may do so over time.

Which is just to say she's never been on the counter, but that could
change.

(I would find it hilarious if she were going up there when I wasn't
around, but I've seen no evidence of that.)

--Catherine
& Rosalie the calicohead

Mary
November 9th 04, 08:35 PM
"kaeli" > wrote

> > I don't think the OP needs to just accept it. For every cat owner whose
> > cats are all over the counters there are two with cats that generally
> > do not do this.
>
> Who do not do this _in front of them_.
> Or, maybe they're just lazy cats.

Buddha is way too fat to jump up on counters,
esp. since her thyroid treatment. However: Cheeks
never gets up on them or the tables when I am looking.
She did at first, but the "NO" thing (together with shooing)
worked. She isn't lazy, she is just polite. :) And she has plenty of places
she is allowed to get up in: windows with shelves. I have glass tables and
dark wood tables with
high finishes, so I can indeed see footprints when she gets up there. I have
not seen any since about a month after I got her--three years ago.


> I have one who insists on climbing all over my shelves despite my not
being very pleased about it. The other two just don't find it all that
entertaining.

I just don't think your cat that "insists" would if you were consistent
about reacting with loud "NOs" accompanied by getting up as though you are
going to "get" him or her. If you did, he or she would not "insist."

>
> > The OP has taken these cats and their owner into
> > his home, and he does not like cats all over the counters. I don't like
> > it either, and it does not happen as far as I can tell.
>
> Yeah, that's what my mom said about the cat going on tables...until she
got a glass table. She could actually SEE the paw prints on the glass.

As I mentioned above, I do have glass tables and highly
finished dark wood, so I would know. It is simply not true that cats cannot
be trained not to jump up on things, kaeli. I always suspect that those who
claim this have simply been unsuccessful at training their cats.
>
> Some cats are easily deterred from things like tinfoil or squirt bottles
and
> never bother to try going up there again. Others will always find a way
when
> your back is turned. The minute you take the foil off, they're up there
> again.

Maybe, I have not had lots and lots of cats, only the ones
I grew up with (maybe six total, they were "indoor/outdoor" so we did not
have them long as they all
got hit or disappeared or appeared with their guts ripped out by dogs and
died) and Gnarly, Cheeks, and Buddha. But neither my cats nor my sister's
cats nor my mother's cats climb all over and lounge on the kitchen counters.
When I see this, it is the exception not the rule, and it does gross me out.
I have alot of breakables, too, delicate glass things on marble top tables,
and with hardwood, tile, and stone floors I imagine I would know if Cheeks
were up on these. She broke one Lenox dish early on, and that was it. In
three years.

> MOST cats can be trained to stay off things (that is, they just don't
really bother to go up there any more). Others you'll need to use avoidance
stuff
> (like the tinfoil or a scat mat) forever - or until they're too old to
jump
> that high.

Well here you seem to agree with me. So maybe the rest was a waste of
typing.

>
> My 3 cats EAT and DRINK on the counter (their food is up there to keep it
out
> of reach of the dog) and I don't find cat hair in my food. So, don't take
the
> finding of hair or general cleanliness to be all that indicative. Cats are
> naturally pretty clean animals.

Ahhh, I see. that is a different story, as you don't have much choice there.
I don't have dogs because my husband won't have indoor dogs and I won't
have outdoor only ones.


>
> --
> --
> ~kaeli~
> Does the name Pavlov ring a bell?
> http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
> http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace
>

ceb
November 9th 04, 09:50 PM
"Mary" > wrote in news:4S9kd.28850$YL.2728686
@twister.southeast.rr.com:

> I always suspect that those who
> claim this have simply been unsuccessful at training their cats.
>

Cat training can be pretty dicey. Rosalie, as I've said before, is
extremely sensitive and a gentle "no" and head shake is enough to deter her
from whatever objectionable thing she might be doing (like treating the
dog's plumey tail as a cat toy, for instance, which makes me laugh but
disturbs the dog somehow). But Nickleby kind of did what he wanted and it
was hard to get him to stop -- I sometimes resorted to yelling which also
did not work. I always called him "the cat with enormous self-esteem" -- he
was absolutely impervious to correction or crankiness. I might succeed in
chasing him away (from the furniture he was scratching, for example) but he
would trot right back moments later, purring and quite pleased with
himself. He felt he could do no wrong.

--Catherine
& Rosalie the calicohead

MaryL
November 9th 04, 10:18 PM
"Ringo Langly" > wrote in message
om...
> "Bill Stock" > wrote in message
> >...
>> "Ringo Langly" > wrote in message
>> om...
>>
>>
>> I believe a squirt bottle or tinfoil on the table are effective
>> deterrents.
>
> Hi Bill,
>
> I never thought about putting tinfoil or the squirt bottle on the
> counter. They have learned to run when we even lift the bottle, so
> that might actually work.
>
> Thanks for the suggestion!
>
> Ringo

Yes, but they may have learned to run *only* when you are around. My sister
once thought she had "trained" her cats to stay off the counter. Then, once
day when she was working in the yard, she looked at the house and saw one of
the cats on the counter. By the time she entered the house, the cat had run
to the other room and settled on the sofa -- looking completely innocent.

I simply wipe down the counter and table before using them.

MaryL

Cathy Friedmann
November 10th 04, 01:30 AM
I gave up on keeping the cat off the counters & table (breakfast nook
table - they don't generally get up onto the dining room table) years &
years ago. They're allowed in the bedrooms, too (they often like to sleep
on the beds) - but I keep the bathroom door shut - to keep them from tipping
over the bathroom wastebasket.

Cathy

"Ringo Langly" > wrote in message
om...
> Hi,
>
> A friend of mine moved in (first roommate in years), and with her came
> two cats -- both boys, both fixed with front claws removed, one about
> 18 months (part simese part something else -- crosseyed) and one about
> 5 years old (calico and something else). Also my place is rather
> large, but we keep the bedroom and bathroom doors shut when not home
> so the cats don't roam where they shouldn't.
>
> I'm generally not an animal person and never had a cat, but I figured
> I'd give it a try. She and the cats moved in about 2 months ago, and
> the issues I thought I'd have (cat box, smell, etc) are not issues at
> all since she keeps the litter pan cleaned out and it's tucked back in
> the laundry room. THe problem is the cats get on the kitchen
> counters, tables, and all over the place where I didn't figure they'd
> go. How healthy is this? With their paws in the litter pan then on
> the counters do they track stuff everyplace? Also when cats sit do
> their butts touch the counter or whatever they're on?
>
> Sorry for the crazy questions, but though my roommate grew-up with
> cats, she couldn't answer these questions. The cats get on the
> counters and tables we use to fix food on and eat on, and though I've
> made it a habit to clean everything before preparing foods or eating,
> it just kind of grosses me out a bit. I'm generally a clean freak :)
>
> Thanks for any info or suggestions... I'd prefer the cats didn't get
> on the counters and tables at all - and they generally don't when
> we're home - but I was off yesterday and noticed everytime I walked
> into the kitchen they were lounging up there. I sprayed them with
> water, tapped their head (not hard or anything), and said NO... but
> didn't work.
>
> Thanks again, and take care,
>
> Ringo

Phil P.
November 10th 04, 02:31 AM
"Ringo Langly" > wrote in message
om...
> "Bill Stock" > wrote in message
>...
> > "Ringo Langly" > wrote in message
> > om...
> > > Hi,
> > >
> > > A friend of mine moved in (first roommate in years), and with her came
> > > two cats -- both boys, both fixed with front claws removed, one about
> > > 18 months (part simese part something else -- crosseyed) and one about
> > > 5 years old (calico and something else). Also my place is rather
> > > large, but we keep the bedroom and bathroom doors shut when not home
> > > so the cats don't roam where they shouldn't.
> > > [snip]
> >
> > I would not recommend it.
> >
> > Just put the cats down when you see them on the counter and say NO! It
> > worked for our cat Cali, who learned to jump up when we weren't looking.
:)
> > Now she's too old to jump up and the young one rarely jumps on the
table.
> >
> > I believe a squirt bottle or tinfoil on the table are effective
deterrents.
>
> Hi Bill,
>
> I never thought about putting tinfoil or the squirt bottle on the
> counter. They have learned to run when we even lift the bottle, so
> that might actually work.

It will work only when you're around. All you'll be training your cats to
do is to fear you. You'll also confuse them -because when you're not around
jumping on the counter is ok.

Cats learn by association, anticipation, and observation. What you need to
do is train them by remote control, so: 1. they don't associate the
correction with you, and 2.: they don't associate the correction only with
your presence. IOW, the same thing happens when they jump on the counter
whether you're present or not.

If you want to teach a cat to stay off the counter whether you're there or
not, tape a few pieces of cardboard together for the length of the counter;
let the cardboard hang 10"-12" over the edge. Weigh down the back edge of
the cardboard with a few empty soda cans with a few coins in them. Leave
the kitchen.

When the cat jumps up on the edge of the counter she'll land on the
cardboard hanging over the edge - which will flip over and also catapult the
soda cans with coins in them into the air - that will make a racket when
they hit the floor. After the surprise of the short fall and the noise, I
don't think you'll have to worry about "cats on the counter and licken' the
spoon" (ba domp ba).

You can also try a piece of clear plastic carpet runner upside down (with
the nubs facing up). Make sure the nubs aren't too sharp (drag the runner
over concrete if they are) - Cut the runner into strips to fit the areas of
the counter where the cats jump on.

With both of these methods, the result of jumping on the counter will be
same whether you're present or not and most important - the cats won't
associate the correction with you.


Personally, I think you're overreacting - the cats sleep in your bed, right?
The cats groom their coats with their tongues, right? You pet them, right?
Do you know what else cats do with their tongues....? LOL!

Phil

Phil P.
November 10th 04, 03:46 AM
"Hodge" > wrote in message
nk.net...
> In article >,
> "Phil P." > wrote:
>
> > When the cat jumps up on the edge of the counter she'll land on the
> > cardboard hanging over the edge - which will flip over and also catapult
the
> > soda cans with coins in them into the air - that will make a racket when
> > they hit the floor.
>
> This doesn't sound very good for the floor, however . . .

He's not trying to train the floor.... :->

I don't think a few empty soda cans falling 3' will damage the floor...
unless he lives in a house of playing cards.

Ringo Langly
November 10th 04, 02:41 PM
kaeli > wrote in message >...
> In article >,
> enlightened us with...
> >
> > Sorry for the crazy questions, but though my roommate grew-up with
> > cats, she couldn't answer these questions. The cats get on the
> > counters and tables we use to fix food on and eat on, and though I've
> > made it a habit to clean everything before preparing foods or eating,
> > it just kind of grosses me out a bit. I'm generally a clean freak :)
> >
>
> Don't be a baby. If you knew how much was on your hands, clothing, bedding,
> and carpet, you'd stop worrying about the cats or drop dead from shock. One
> of the two. ;)
>
> / You posted that greenlit thread about cat butts on Fark, didn't you?
>
> --

Hi...

I did see the article on Fark, but I didn't post it. I can say it did
prompt the question on here -- but I've been wanting to ask it for
some time.

You're right in that there are germs everyplace, which can't be
avoided. I do however think some precausions can be taken that cut
down on the level of germs, like washing hands after using the
restroom or washing an apple before eating it. I am one of those
people who doesn't touch the public bathroom doorknob (use paper towl)
and flushes with my foot. I also wash my hands quite often -- but it
pays off because I'm rarely (if ever) sick. Having kitties in the
house is one negative to helping a friend out. Last night I did find
two piles of puke, but luckily it was on the tile foor :)

As for the cats on the counter, it's not only the germ factor but
several other factors. I know having cats requires some extra effort
-- like not leaving food out or things on the counters that can be
knocked over easily. I've found dishes licked clean in the sink, and
one cat even ate an entire bowl of grease drained from ground beef I
left on the counter overnight. This was all the first week after my
roommate moved in with her cats, so I've wised-up a bit and make sure
dishes get put in dishwasher and nothing is left out. I've also added
those baby latches to the cabinets on the ground level (under the sink
mainly), because I do keep stuff under there which would make the
kitties sick if they got into them.

Other folks posted the cats mainly get onto the counters when we're
away -- which is true in my case too. I'll see them on the counters
as I walk to the house (through windows) or hear them when in the
other room.

Anyway, thanks everyone for the great replies -- they have helped.
But to this post in particular, I disagree in that some level of
cleanliness can be achieved with some effort.

Ringo

kaeli
November 10th 04, 03:41 PM
In article >,
enlightened us with...
>
>
> > I have one who insists on climbing all over my shelves despite my not
> being very pleased about it. The other two just don't find it all that
> entertaining.
>
> I just don't think your cat that "insists" would if you were consistent
> about reacting with loud "NOs" accompanied by getting up as though you are
> going to "get" him or her. If you did, he or she would not "insist."
>

You don't know Rowan. ;)
She's been yelled at, squirted, even scruffed to stay off the shelves. She
doesn't care. She gets up there, I yell at her to get down, she does. Rinse.
Repeat. Wipe hands on pants. *LOL* (yes, I did eventually give up - Rowan is
now almost 5)
It's just too interesting for her up there (she's a very active cat as
opposed to my other two couch potatoes). There's a hanging plant nearby that
she likes to harass. There's fun things to knock down and play with. Nothing
competes with doing as she pleases. That's just Rowan. If I don't want her to
do something, I need to make her think it's her decision. Or just give up.
Good example - towels in the bathroom. She loves to pull them down. I don't
know why. She knows she shouldn't. She never does it in front of me. I put
empty soda cans up there so when she pulled them down, the cans would fall
and scare her. She now only pulls down towels when cans are not up there.
*LOL*

So, I just keep the bathroom door closed. *heh*

If I really wanted her to stay off the shelves, I'd have to move the plant
and remove everything interesting from the shelves. Forever. *grins*
So, we do our little ritual. She gets up there, I tell her to get down, she
jumps down and does something else for awhile, then jumps up there again...
It's kinda funny now, actually, but I gave up really trying to keep her off
there 2 years ago. She outlasted me. *laughs*

Kind of like a dog, really. If you have a dog that likes to root in the trash
can, the easiest way to handle it is to put the trash can under the sink
where the dog can't get to it.

She's my "special child". The Princess. AKA Scarlett.
She's very unlike any other cat I've ever had. Maybe that's why she's my
favorite.

--
--
~kaeli~
Press any key to continue or any other key to quit
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace

kaeli
November 10th 04, 03:43 PM
In article >,
enlightened us with...
>
> Cat training can be pretty dicey. Rosalie, as I've said before, is
> extremely sensitive and a gentle "no" and head shake is enough to deter her
> from whatever objectionable thing she might be doing (like treating the
> dog's plumey tail as a cat toy, for instance, which makes me laugh but
> disturbs the dog somehow).

Just like my Isis. All I have to do is say her name in a shocked voice and
she stops immediately.

> But Nickleby kind of did what he wanted and it
> was hard to get him to stop -- I sometimes resorted to yelling which also
> did not work. I always called him "the cat with enormous self-esteem" -- he
> was absolutely impervious to correction or crankiness. I might succeed in
> chasing him away (from the furniture he was scratching, for example) but he
> would trot right back moments later, purring and quite pleased with
> himself. He felt he could do no wrong.

And this is like my Rowan. Sometimes I wonder if she finds it funny to get a
rise out of me.

--
--
~kaeli~
The Bermuda Triangle got tired of warm weather. It moved to
Finland. Now Santa Claus is missing.
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace

kaeli
November 10th 04, 03:49 PM
In article >,
enlightened us with...
>
> Anyway, thanks everyone for the great replies -- they have helped.
> But to this post in particular, I disagree in that some level of
> cleanliness can be achieved with some effort.
>

Of course it, can, silly, but you don't have to be paranoid.
I get sick once a year like everyone else. Whoop-di-doo. ;)

Keep your house decently clean, vaccuum, wash the counters, etc like a normal
person. But you don't have to get all crazy about germs. (you flush with your
foot??)

That's all I was saying. You can't get ALL the germs. And if you could, your
poor immune system would be so out of practice, the first one to get in would
be the death of you. *grins*

Anyway, try not to be overly worried about the whole thing. Just be sensible.
Wash the counters before you prepare food. Wash your hands. Etc - like you
already do, basically. You are more likely to get sick from touching railings
in public than from your own indoor cat going on your counters.

--
--
~kaeli~
The Bermuda Triangle got tired of warm weather. It moved to
Finland. Now Santa Claus is missing.
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace

ceb
November 10th 04, 04:10 PM
kaeli > wrote in
:

>> But Nickleby kind of did what he wanted and it
>> was hard to get him to stop -- I sometimes resorted to yelling which
>> also did not work. I always called him "the cat with enormous
>> self-esteem" -- he was absolutely impervious to correction or
>> crankiness. I might succeed in chasing him away (from the furniture
>> he was scratching, for example) but he would trot right back moments
>> later, purring and quite pleased with himself. He felt he could do no
>> wrong.
>
> And this is like my Rowan. Sometimes I wonder if she finds it funny to
> get a rise out of me.
>

I think it's a sign of extreme confidence and security. I would actually
love to see Rosalie behaving this way -- any signs of increased security
are extremely welcome in a formerly feral cat.

--Catherine
& Rosalie the calicohead

Mary
November 10th 04, 04:35 PM
"kaeli" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> enlightened us with...
>>
>>
>> > I have one who insists on climbing all over my shelves despite my not
>> being very pleased about it. The other two just don't find it all that
>> entertaining.
>>
>> I just don't think your cat that "insists" would if you were consistent
>> about reacting with loud "NOs" accompanied by getting up as though you
>> are
>> going to "get" him or her. If you did, he or she would not "insist."
>>
>
> You don't know Rowan. ;)
> She's been yelled at, squirted, even scruffed to stay off the shelves. She
> doesn't care. She gets up there, I yell at her to get down, she does.
> Rinse.
> Repeat. Wipe hands on pants. *LOL* (yes, I did eventually give up - Rowan
> is
> now almost 5)

Okay, I concede that there may be some cats who are too stubborn
to listen, even when you are at home. But that has not been my experience
with my cats.


> It's just too interesting for her up there (she's a very active cat as
> opposed to my other two couch potatoes). There's a hanging plant nearby
> that
> she likes to harass. There's fun things to knock down and play with.
> Nothing
> competes with doing as she pleases. That's just Rowan. If I don't want her
> to
> do something, I need to make her think it's her decision. Or just give up.
> Good example - towels in the bathroom. She loves to pull them down. I
> don't
> know why. She knows she shouldn't. She never does it in front of me. I put
> empty soda cans up there so when she pulled them down, the cans would fall
> and scare her. She now only pulls down towels when cans are not up there.
> *LOL*

They can be scary smart at times.
>
> So, I just keep the bathroom door closed. *heh*
>
> If I really wanted her to stay off the shelves, I'd have to move the plant
> and remove everything interesting from the shelves. Forever. *grins*
> So, we do our little ritual. She gets up there, I tell her to get down,
> she
> jumps down and does something else for awhile, then jumps up there
> again...
> It's kinda funny now, actually, but I gave up really trying to keep her
> off
> there 2 years ago. She outlasted me. *laughs*

You know, Kaeli, I think the big thing is that you feed your cats on the
counters--albeit only on certain counters--so that is a big impetus for them
to get up on counters. I understand that you have to do it due to the dog,
but certainly if they did not associate counters with food the counters
might not be that attractive.

>>
> She's my "special child". The Princess. AKA Scarlett.
> She's very unlike any other cat I've ever had. Maybe that's why she's my
> favorite.
>

She reminds me of my Gnarly in the "strong-willed" department. But my
old girl was not the brightest bulb in the pack. *Sniff* Wish I could have
her back.

Ashley
November 10th 04, 06:23 PM
"kaeli" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> enlightened us with...
>>
>> Anyway, thanks everyone for the great replies -- they have helped.
>> But to this post in particular, I disagree in that some level of
>> cleanliness can be achieved with some effort.
>>
>
> Of course it, can, silly, but you don't have to be paranoid.
> I get sick once a year like everyone else. Whoop-di-doo. ;)
>
> Keep your house decently clean, vaccuum, wash the counters, etc like a
> normal
> person. But you don't have to get all crazy about germs. (you flush with
> your
> foot??)
>
> That's all I was saying. You can't get ALL the germs. And if you could,
> your
> poor immune system would be so out of practice, the first one to get in
> would
> be the death of you. *grins*
>

There is a strong belief among medical people that an obsession with
over-cleanliness is one of the factors behind the rise in asthma and other
immune disorders in the Western world - that having too few proper threats
to exercise themselves on, our immune systems have turned to exercising
themselves on harmless ones.


> Anyway, try not to be overly worried about the whole thing. Just be
> sensible.
> Wash the counters before you prepare food. Wash your hands. Etc - like you
> already do, basically. You are more likely to get sick from touching
> railings
> in public than from your own indoor cat going on your counters.

I'll second that. Just wash and clean as you did before and you won't be at
any risk of anything you need to worry about.

kaeli
November 10th 04, 07:41 PM
In article >,
enlightened us with...
>
> Okay, I concede that there may be some cats who are too stubborn
> to listen, even when you are at home. But that has not been my experience
> with my cats.
>

It was never mine either until Princess. *smiles*
So, I think it's pretty rare.
I've had cats my whole life and never one this stubborn. *LOL*

>
> You know, Kaeli, I think the big thing is that you feed your cats on the
> counters--albeit only on certain counters--so that is a big impetus for them
> to get up on counters. I understand that you have to do it due to the dog,
> but certainly if they did not associate counters with food the counters
> might not be that attractive.
>

Oh, I never said I had a problem with them on the counters. I don't. I don't
like them on my shelves (as in book shelves). They knock the knick-knacks
over. I have candles and little stones and stuff all displayed pretty and the
like.
It's not a massive battle or anything, I just prefer they don't go up there
so nothing gets accidentally broken. 2 out of the 3 are fine with that.
Princess would prefer to play with the kick-knacks.

--
--
~kaeli~
When a clock is hungry, it goes back four seconds.
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace

Cathy Friedmann
November 11th 04, 12:07 AM
"kaeli" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> enlightened us with...
> >
> > Anyway, thanks everyone for the great replies -- they have helped.
> > But to this post in particular, I disagree in that some level of
> > cleanliness can be achieved with some effort.
> >
>
> Of course it, can, silly, but you don't have to be paranoid.
> I get sick once a year like everyone else. Whoop-di-doo. ;)
>
> Keep your house decently clean, vaccuum, wash the counters, etc like a
normal
> person. But you don't have to get all crazy about germs. (you flush with
your
> foot??)

<g> T Once upon a time there was an OT thread a mile long (no, make that 10
miles long!) in another ng I frequent about foot-flushers Vs. hand flushers.
Even became a tad acrimonious at times! ;-)

Cathy

Mary
November 11th 04, 12:18 AM
"Cathy Friedmann" > wrote >
> <g> T Once upon a time there was an OT thread a mile long (no, make that
> 10
> miles long!) in another ng I frequent about foot-flushers Vs. hand
> flushers.
> Even became a tad acrimonious at times! ;-)
>

What I hate are the "sprinklers." If everyone just sat down
on the damned seats they would probably be a lot cleaner.

Cathy Friedmann
November 12th 04, 12:42 AM
"kaeli" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> enlightened us with...
> >
> > Sorry for the crazy questions, but though my roommate grew-up with
> > cats, she couldn't answer these questions. The cats get on the
> > counters and tables we use to fix food on and eat on, and though I've
> > made it a habit to clean everything before preparing foods or eating,
> > it just kind of grosses me out a bit. I'm generally a clean freak :)
> >
>
> Don't be a baby. If you knew how much was on your hands, clothing,
bedding,
> and carpet, you'd stop worrying about the cats or drop dead from shock.
One
> of the two. ;)

In line w/ this...

http://nytimes.com/2004/11/09/health/09essa.html

Cathy

Tiger Girl
November 17th 04, 06:13 PM
On Wed, 10 Nov 2004 09:43:37 -0600, kaeli >> But Nickleby kind of did
what he wanted and it
>> was hard to get him to stop -- I sometimes resorted to yelling which also
>> did not work. I always called him "the cat with enormous self-esteem" -- he
>> was absolutely impervious to correction or crankiness. I might succeed in
>> chasing him away (from the furniture he was scratching, for example) but he
>> would trot right back moments later, purring and quite pleased with
>> himself. He felt he could do no wrong.
>
>And this is like my Rowan. Sometimes I wonder if she finds it funny to get a
>rise out of me.

This is Buster all over the place. He sleeps like a log on the bed,
rises at a totally unreasonable hour, and stalks off the bed to sink
his claws into my wicker drawers. I'm fine with everything but the
clawing of the wicker drawers (it's destructive, and he could bring
the furniture down on himself). This all happens at a time I'd prefer
to be sleeping. I tried scolding him, he scoffed. I shouted. He
looked impressed and then scoffed. I hissed. He ran under the bed,
but as soon as I'd fallen back asleep there he was at it again.

Then I settled for hurling a small stuffed teddy bear at him. I did
this a couple of times, and now all I have to do is show him the teddy
bear and he runs off. It's a ritual. He stalks, I stir, he claws, I
wake just enough to show him the bear, he runs off, and I go blessedly
back to sleep.

THe other morning I actually woke up and discovered that the little
bugger is clawing the wicker, then pausing and waiting for me to
brandish the bear. If I don't do it the first time, he keeps it up.
Claw, pause, look, wait. Rinse lather repeat. No question this is all
for a rise. Good thing I don't usually have to wake up for it...

Tiger Girl
November 17th 04, 06:16 PM
>Oh, I never said I had a problem with them on the counters. I don't. I don't
>like them on my shelves (as in book shelves). They knock the knick-knacks
>over. I have candles and little stones and stuff all displayed pretty and the
>like.
>It's not a massive battle or anything, I just prefer they don't go up there
>so nothing gets accidentally broken. 2 out of the 3 are fine with that.
>Princess would prefer to play with the kick-knacks.

I think we must have the same cat. I don't like Buster on the
counters at all (it's just too unsafe, he could play with a knife, or
walk on a hot stove burner) so I tried cris-crossing them with
double-stick tape. He hated the tape.

He'd jump up on the counter, hit the tape, make an expression of high
distaste, gather his resolve, and forge ahead, clearly hating every
nasty sticky little step. Nothing like persistence...

Tiger Girl
November 17th 04, 06:20 PM
Heh...if you use a piece of toilet paper to wipe the seat before you
sit down, you'll never sit on a wet seat, and as a bonus, you'll never
be caught with an empty roll of paper. :)

On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 00:18:58 GMT, "Mary" >
wrote:

>
>"Cathy Friedmann" > wrote >
>> <g> T Once upon a time there was an OT thread a mile long (no, make that
>> 10
>> miles long!) in another ng I frequent about foot-flushers Vs. hand
>> flushers.
>> Even became a tad acrimonious at times! ;-)
>>
>
>What I hate are the "sprinklers." If everyone just sat down
>on the damned seats they would probably be a lot cleaner.
>

Monique Y. Mudama
November 17th 04, 09:09 PM
["Followup-To:" header set to rec.pets.cats.misc.] On 2004-11-09, Ringo Langly
penned:
>
> My habit is to use Lysol disinfectant spray on the counters almost daily,
> whether cooking or not. I was just wondering what others do to either train
> the cats to not jump on the counters or what they do to disuade the cats
> from doing it. I've heard of a spray you can use that cats don't like --
> one friend called it 'anti-catnip' because the smell or something in it cats
> can't stand. Any idea what this is?
>

I know you can get "bitter apple" spray to discourage dogs from chewing on
your furniture. Maybe the same thing?

--
monique

Monique Y. Mudama
November 17th 04, 09:12 PM
["Followup-To:" header set to rec.pets.cats.misc.] On 2004-11-09, Ringo Langly
penned:
>
> Hi Barb,
>
> I don't generally put food directly on the counter, but I'd like to think if
> something falls on the counter, whether a spoon or bit of food, that it's
> not covered in the same germs in the kitty pan. I don't want to treat my
> counters and tables at home like I treat tables at restaurantes where if
> something touches it it's to be avoided.
>
> My habit is to use Lysol disinfectant spray on the counters almost daily,
> whether cooking or not. I was just wondering what others do to either train
> the cats to not jump on the counters or what they do to disuade the cats
> from doing it. I've heard of a spray you can use that cats don't like --
> one friend called it 'anti-catnip' because the smell or something in it cats
> can't stand. Any idea what this is?

Another thought ... if you're this hung up about germs, you probably want to
keep up the lysol treatments and whatnot. Pet fur gets into the air vents and
will distribute itself throughout the house, regardless of where the pet has
gone. Also, as I've discovered by reading up on cat allergies (that's people
allergies toward cats), cat saliva used while grooming and marking territory
is so fine that it can float in the air for months.

If it makes you feel better, you're shedding hair and skin all over the house,
too. It's not just the pets.

--
monique

PawsForThought
November 18th 04, 01:55 AM
>Ringo Langly
>penned:

>>
>> My habit is to use Lysol disinfectant spray on the counters almost daily,

Lysol is extremely toxic to cats. I would highly recommend using something
non-toxic like vinegar and water.
________
See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe
Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html
http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html
Declawing Info: http://www.wholecatjournal.com/articles/claws.htm

Zythophile
December 16th 04, 08:10 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
...
>
<snip>
>
> It will work only when you're around. All you'll be training your cats to
> do is to fear you. You'll also confuse them -because when you're not
> around
> jumping on the counter is ok.
>

Do you have to let the cats in the kitchen when you're not there? I never
leave my cats unattended in the kitchen. In fact if they could come and go
from the house without going through the kitchen, they'd not be allowed in
the kichen at all. If I ever found one on the worktop, I think it'd take 20
litres of Dettol before i could even think of cooking in there.

>
> Personally, I think you're overreacting - the cats sleep in your bed,
> right?

Yuk! What a horrible thought!

> The cats groom their coats with their tongues, right? You pet them,
> right?
> Do you know what else cats do with their tongues....? LOL!

Yes, and I always wash my hands after stroking them. I know that the stress
reduction in having and stroking pets is beneficial for health and that
being exposed to the bugs that pets carry is good for the immune system, but
a bit of basic hygiene makes me feel more relaxed.

I'm with Ringo on this one. Cats (or any other animals) and kitchens don't
mix.

BTW, I'm a farmer's son. I grew up with all sorts of animal muck, but that
was strictly outside. The cats & dogs were purely outdoor (and barn) animals
and perfectly healthy and content wth it. I let my cats indoors, but I don't
think I'd ever be comfortable with a dog indoors; which is why i don't have
one.

These views are entrirely personal and based on my own background and
experience, they're not intended to denigrate any other opinions.

Z

Monique Y. Mudama
December 16th 04, 08:48 PM
["Followup-To:" header set to rec.pets.cats.misc.] On 2004-12-16, Zythophile
penned:
>
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>
> Do you have to let the cats in the kitchen when you're not there? I never
> leave my cats unattended in the kitchen. In fact if they could come and go
> from the house without going through the kitchen, they'd not be allowed in
> the kichen at all. If I ever found one on the worktop, I think it'd take 20
> litres of Dettol before i could even think of cooking in there.

A lot of houses have open floorplans. My kitchen has two entrances, neither
of which has a door. In fact, I don't remember ever being in a kitchen that
was completely sealed off from the rest of the house. Amazingly, knock on
wood, Oscar has exhibited zero interest in kitchen counters and the like.

>> Personally, I think you're overreacting - the cats sleep in your bed,
>> right?
>
> Yuk! What a horrible thought!

Not to a lot of us. In fact, I'm happy when Oscar decides she wants to spend
some portion of the night with me. Hearing purrs as you drift off to sleep is
so relaxing ...

>> The cats groom their coats with their tongues, right? You pet them, right?
>> Do you know what else cats do with their tongues....? LOL!
>
> Yes, and I always wash my hands after stroking them. I know that the stress
> reduction in having and stroking pets is beneficial for health and that
> being exposed to the bugs that pets carry is good for the immune system, but
> a bit of basic hygiene makes me feel more relaxed.

I'm sure this is a good idea, but i just don't have that kind of discipline.
I do wash my hands before cooking anything, though.

> BTW, I'm a farmer's son. I grew up with all sorts of animal muck, but that
> was strictly outside. The cats & dogs were purely outdoor (and barn) animals
> and perfectly healthy and content wth it. I let my cats indoors, but I don't
> think I'd ever be comfortable with a dog indoors; which is why i don't have
> one.

Did you shower before you entered the house?

Maybe it's just a lifestyle thing. While mountain biking, I get mud and bike
grease into cuts on my body. I might have to pee when I won't find running
water for hours. When skiing, I end up wearing snot-covered face masks, even
if they started the day clean. I figure I deal with so many nasty things that
a little bit of cat isn't going to make much of a difference.

> These views are entrirely personal and based on my own background and
> experience, they're not intended to denigrate any other opinions.

Me, too.

--
monique, who is sometimes allowed to pet Oscar, a grey^H^H^H^Hblue-cream DLH
with an attitude!

Phil P.
December 16th 04, 11:18 PM
"Zythophile" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> <snip>
> >
> > It will work only when you're around. All you'll be training your cats
to
> > do is to fear you. You'll also confuse them -because when you're not
> > around
> > jumping on the counter is ok.
> >
>
> Do you have to let the cats in the kitchen when you're not there?


If possession is 9/10 of the law - its more their house than mine.


I never
> leave my cats unattended in the kitchen. In fact if they could come and go
> from the house without going through the kitchen, they'd not be allowed in
> the kichen at all. If I ever found one on the worktop, I think it'd take
20
> litres of Dettol before i could even think of cooking in there.


Dettol is phenolic compound and toxic to cats. IIRC, Dettol is now labeled
as toxic to cats in the UK.



>
> >
> > Personally, I think you're overreacting - the cats sleep in your bed,
> > right?
>
> Yuk! What a horrible thought!

Then you should love this: At least 3 of my cats sleep in bed with me. One
of my cats dribbles when she purrs and kneads on my chest - sometimes I
sleep with my mouth open and her dribble lands right on my tongue or if its
a good shot - the back of my throat. I don't want to disturb her so I just
swallow it. Are you barffing! LOL!


>
> > The cats groom their coats with their tongues, right? You pet them,
> > right?
> > Do you know what else cats do with their tongues....? LOL!
>
> Yes, and I always wash my hands after stroking them. I know that the
stress
> reduction in having and stroking pets is beneficial for health and that
> being exposed to the bugs that pets carry is good for the immune system,
but
> a bit of basic hygiene makes me feel more relaxed.

Washing your hands after petting your cat is "a bit of basic hygiene"?
Sounds more like neurosis to me. ;-> I wash my hands before I pet my
cats...


>
> I'm with Ringo on this one. Cats (or any other animals) and kitchens don't
> mix.

Knowing my cats go in the kitchen, I keep everything that is even remotely
dangerous to them inaccessable. I don't allow my cats on the counter when
I'm cooking or preparing food for *their* safety - not mine. When I was a
kid, I used to swim in Pelham Bay off City Island - you heard of Lake Huron,
this was "Lake Urine". I don't even get infections from cat bites - and
they're notorious for Pasteurella and Pasteurelloses.


>
> BTW, I'm a farmer's son. I grew up with all sorts of animal muck,

I grew up in NYC. I wore a Yankee baseball cap so the pigeon **** wouldn't
land on my nose and run down onto my hot dogs anymore. Dodging pigeon ****
in NYC is like running through a hail storm.


but that
> was strictly outside. The cats & dogs were purely outdoor (and barn)
animals
> and perfectly healthy and content wth it. I let my cats indoors, but I
don't
> think I'd ever be comfortable with a dog indoors; which is why i don't
have
> one.
>
> These views are entrirely personal and based on my own background and
> experience, they're not intended to denigrate any other opinions.


Mine too. I was just kidding, even though it was all true.

Phil

>
> Z
>
>

Zythophile
December 17th 04, 09:36 AM
"Monique Y. Mudama" > wrote in message
...

<snip>

>
> A lot of houses have open floorplans. My kitchen has two entrances,
> neither
> of which has a door.

I didn't think of that. I've never lived in an open plan house, so it didn't
occur to me.

>> BTW, I'm a farmer's son. I grew up with all sorts of animal muck, but
>> that
>> was strictly outside. The cats & dogs were purely outdoor (and barn)
>> animals
>> and perfectly healthy and content wth it. I let my cats indoors, but I
>> don't
>> think I'd ever be comfortable with a dog indoors; which is why i don't
>> have
>> one.
>
> Did you shower before you entered the house?

Not before entering the house, but first trip was to the bathroom. Mind you
i do remember my mother threatening to hose me down on more than one
occaision. Like most kids, I was a muck magnet.

>
> Maybe it's just a lifestyle thing.

True. Those of us who choose to have cats know we have to make compromises
in our lifestyles to accommodate them. We all make the compromises that we
are comfortable with. I feel for the OP because he's having to make
compromises for someone else's cats. What greater love hath any man than to
put up with someone else's pets? Mmm.. I know the answer to that - putting
up with someone else's kids :-)

Barb
December 17th 04, 04:33 PM
You need to watch Oprah Winfrey and find out that about the filthiest places
are movie theater chairs, hand rails in stores, kids toys, you can go on and
on. Just wash your hands before you eat and don't put food on the kitchen
counter. ( Use plates!)

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.

Monique Y. Mudama
December 17th 04, 06:37 PM
On 2004-12-17, Meghan Noecker penned:
>
> And I usually put wax paper down if I want to put food directly on the
> counter.

Ooh, that's a good idea. Wonder why I never thought of that? Not just
because of pet and people germs, but in case washing down the counter after
preparing chicken didn't catch *everything* ...

> Same here. If I had to wash my hands everytime I touched a cat or dog, I
> would never get anything done. But I do wash them before preparing food.

Now that I don't have a Lab in my life, their oily fur weirds me out and I
wash off the dog smell and slobber after playing with them. It didn't bother
me much while Puma was alive, though. In fact, when he and I were both young,
I remember wrestling with him. Somehow he always got a dusty, dirty paw in my
mouth! Blechhh!

--
monique, who is sometimes allowed to pet Oscar, a grey^H^H^H^Hblue-cream DLH
with an attitude!

Monique Y. Mudama
December 17th 04, 08:05 PM
On 2004-12-17, Zythophile penned:
>
> "Monique Y. Mudama" > wrote in message
> ...
>
><snip>
>
>>
>> A lot of houses have open floorplans. My kitchen has two entrances,
>> neither of which has a door.
>
> I didn't think of that. I've never lived in an open plan house, so it didn't
> occur to me.

I love the feel of having so much space, but there are certainly downsides.
For one thing, if I'm trying to sleep, my husband can't watch TV ... the sound
travels *everywhere*.

>> Did you shower before you entered the house?
>
> Not before entering the house, but first trip was to the bathroom. Mind you
> i do remember my mother threatening to hose me down on more than one
> occaision. Like most kids, I was a muck magnet.

My mom threatened me with that, too =)

> True. Those of us who choose to have cats know we have to make compromises
> in our lifestyles to accommodate them. We all make the compromises that we
> are comfortable with. I feel for the OP because he's having to make
> compromises for someone else's cats. What greater love hath any man than to
> put up with someone else's pets? Mmm.. I know the answer to that - putting
> up with someone else's kids :-)

I agree that it would be tough living with a pet if you wouldn't have chosen
that pet on your own. And I don't think it's too much of a stretch to say
that pet-rearing theories are as varied as kid-rearing theories. For example,
I would have a real hard time living in a house where cats are allowed on the
dinner table ... even during dinner. I had a high school boyfriend whose
family thought that was cute. It grossed me out. Other people would be fine
with that; it just bugs me.

--
monique, who is sometimes allowed to pet Oscar, a grey^H^H^H^Hblue-cream DLH
with an attitude!

KellyH
December 19th 04, 03:19 AM
"Zythophile" > wrote in message
...
>

> Do you have to let the cats in the kitchen when you're not there? I never
> leave my cats unattended in the kitchen. In fact if they could come and go
> from the house without going through the kitchen, they'd not be allowed in
> the kichen at all. If I ever found one on the worktop, I think it'd take
> 20 litres of Dettol before i could even think of cooking in there.
>

My kitchen doesn't have a door, so I don't know how I would block it off
anyway. The only reason I might not let cats in the kitchen is if there was
something unsafe in there.


>> Personally, I think you're overreacting - the cats sleep in your bed,
>> right?
>
> Yuk! What a horrible thought!

What a horrible thought??? What a wonderful thought! I love having the
cats in bed. NewCat always sleeps right above my head, purring. I can't
think of a nicer way to fall asleep. Although I do wish she would let me
have more of the pillow.

> Yes, and I always wash my hands after stroking them. I know that the
> stress reduction in having and stroking pets is beneficial for health and
> that being exposed to the bugs that pets carry is good for the immune
> system, but a bit of basic hygiene makes me feel more relaxed.

OMG, Dude! You need to chill! If I washed my hands every time I pet a cat,
I would be washing them all day.


--
-Kelly
kelly at farringtons dot net
"Wake up, and smell the cat food" -TMBG

Barb
December 19th 04, 09:17 PM
And too much hand washing in winter weather can dry them out, make them
crack, and leave them open to all the germs they may pick up from theater
seats, toys, hand rails etc..

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.