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Zythophile
December 16th 04, 08:19 PM
My 5 year old moggie has just developed wanderlust. I moved house about a
year ago and expected problems then. But she's been fine until about 6 weeks
ago. Now she's gone missing twice in 6 weeks for about 12 days each.

She's been found and returned both times, after a poster campaign by me &
the kids; the first time by someone about a kilometre away and the second
time by a neighbour about 50 m away. I live in a city centre, so a 1 km
radius gives lots of hiding spaces and lots of potential new homes. On both
occaisions she's returned in good condition and well fed - in fact a bit too
well fed. I suspect that she's found a second home somewhere.

I've had her microchipped mainly because she loses any collar I put on her
within a week. In hindsight, I think that was pointless - there are so many
alley cats around here that if everyone reported every potential stray, the
RSPCA would be snowed under.

Does anyone have any suggestions to discourage her wandering? She's too old
and to become a housecat, and to be honest, I've never had a housecat. I
find it difficult enough to keep the cats indoors for a couple of days after
they've been in the cattery. The fortnight I had to keep them confined to
barracks when I moved house was sheer hell for me and I don't think they
enjoyed it much either.

Any suggestions will be gratefully received.

Z

Wendy
December 17th 04, 01:08 PM
"Zythophile" > wrote in message
...
> My 5 year old moggie has just developed wanderlust. I moved house about a
> year ago and expected problems then. But she's been fine until about 6
weeks
> ago. Now she's gone missing twice in 6 weeks for about 12 days each.
>
> She's been found and returned both times, after a poster campaign by me &
> the kids; the first time by someone about a kilometre away and the second
> time by a neighbour about 50 m away. I live in a city centre, so a 1 km
> radius gives lots of hiding spaces and lots of potential new homes. On
both
> occaisions she's returned in good condition and well fed - in fact a bit
too
> well fed. I suspect that she's found a second home somewhere.
>
> I've had her microchipped mainly because she loses any collar I put on her
> within a week. In hindsight, I think that was pointless - there are so
many
> alley cats around here that if everyone reported every potential stray,
the
> RSPCA would be snowed under.
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions to discourage her wandering? She's too
old
> and to become a housecat, and to be honest, I've never had a housecat. I
> find it difficult enough to keep the cats indoors for a couple of days
after
> they've been in the cattery. The fortnight I had to keep them confined to
> barracks when I moved house was sheer hell for me and I don't think they
> enjoyed it much either.
>
> Any suggestions will be gratefully received.
>
> Z
>
>

Build an enclosure for her in your yard.

Patscga
December 17th 04, 01:47 PM
Since you're treating your cat like it's a feral animal, that's the way it's
going to behave.
Pat

Zythophile
December 17th 04, 04:33 PM
"Patscga" > wrote in message
...
> Since you're treating your cat like it's a feral animal, that's the way
> it's
> going to behave.
> Pat

I don't understand

Zythophile
December 17th 04, 04:50 PM
"Wendy" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> Build an enclosure for her in your yard.
>

I've thought of that, but I'm worried that it would be just as constraining
for her as being a housecat. I don't like to see any animal confined. I'm
beginning to think that I'll just have to try to find a new home for her in
the sticks. I think it's a case of, "You can take the cat out of the
countryside, but you can't take the countryside out of the cat."

Thanks for the suggestion anyway.

--
Z
51° 37' 23" N, 3° 56' 27" W

Scott Buchanan
December 17th 04, 06:31 PM
It sound like that it is time to let her go. Go to a home that she chooses.
Cats know how to find a good home if they want. Chances are she will come
back to visit on occasion.
"Zythophile" > wrote in message
...
> My 5 year old moggie has just developed wanderlust. I moved house about a
> year ago and expected problems then. But she's been fine until about 6
weeks
> ago. Now she's gone missing twice in 6 weeks for about 12 days each.
>
> She's been found and returned both times, after a poster campaign by me &
> the kids; the first time by someone about a kilometre away and the second
> time by a neighbour about 50 m away. I live in a city centre, so a 1 km
> radius gives lots of hiding spaces and lots of potential new homes. On
both
> occaisions she's returned in good condition and well fed - in fact a bit
too
> well fed. I suspect that she's found a second home somewhere.
>
> I've had her microchipped mainly because she loses any collar I put on her
> within a week. In hindsight, I think that was pointless - there are so
many
> alley cats around here that if everyone reported every potential stray,
the
> RSPCA would be snowed under.
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions to discourage her wandering? She's too
old
> and to become a housecat, and to be honest, I've never had a housecat. I
> find it difficult enough to keep the cats indoors for a couple of days
after
> they've been in the cattery. The fortnight I had to keep them confined to
> barracks when I moved house was sheer hell for me and I don't think they
> enjoyed it much either.
>
> Any suggestions will be gratefully received.
>
> Z
>
>

Zythophile
December 17th 04, 06:45 PM
"Scott Buchanan" > wrote in message
...
> It sound like that it is time to let her go. Go to a home that she
> chooses.
> Cats know how to find a good home if they want. Chances are she will come
> back to visit on occasion.

If I *knew* that she was going somewhere where she is safe and being looked
after, I'd happily let her go. I suspect that's the case as she certainly
doesn't seem to suffer any ill effects from her wanderings.

However, if someone does think she's a stray and wants to take her in, I
would expect that they'd take her to the vet for a check up. if they did
that, the vet would scan her and my details would be picked up from the
microchip.

As that's obviously not happening, I'm not totally convinced that she's just
not fending for herself. The balance of probability is that she's found a
second home. For my own peace of mind, I'd just like to know for sure. I
suppose I'm being too soft - cats are amazingly good at looking after
themselves and that includes finding someone to feed them and let them curl
up in front of the fire.
--
Z
51° 37' 23" N, 3° 56' 27" W

Monique Y. Mudama
December 17th 04, 09:08 PM
["Followup-To:" header set to rec.pets.cats.misc.] On 2004-12-17, Zythophile
penned:
>
> As that's obviously not happening, I'm not totally convinced that she's just
> not fending for herself. The balance of probability is that she's found a
> second home. For my own peace of mind, I'd just like to know for sure. I
> suppose I'm being too soft - cats are amazingly good at looking after
> themselves and that includes finding someone to feed them and let them curl
> up in front of the fire.

Does she wear a collar? Can you somehow attach a little note-vial?

Just a (weird) thought. I suppose a GPS unit would be too big for a cat to
carry =P

--
monique, who is sometimes allowed to pet Oscar, a grey^H^H^H^Hblue-cream DLH
with an attitude!

BC
December 17th 04, 09:41 PM
Zythophile wrote:
> "Scott Buchanan" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>It sound like that it is time to let her go. Go to a home that she
>>chooses.
>>Cats know how to find a good home if they want. Chances are she will come
>>back to visit on occasion.
>
>
> If I *knew* that she was going somewhere where she is safe and being looked
> after, I'd happily let her go. I suspect that's the case as she certainly
> doesn't seem to suffer any ill effects from her wanderings.
>
> However, if someone does think she's a stray and wants to take her in, I
> would expect that they'd take her to the vet for a check up. if they did
> that, the vet would scan her and my details would be picked up from the
> microchip.
>
> As that's obviously not happening, I'm not totally convinced that she's just
> not fending for herself. The balance of probability is that she's found a
> second home. For my own peace of mind, I'd just like to know for sure. I
> suppose I'm being too soft - cats are amazingly good at looking after
> themselves and that includes finding someone to feed them and let them curl
> up in front of the fire.
This might sound a bit daft but I dont suppose you could do some sort of
poster to find out whos been feeding her, and then work out if they
would like to keep her or just contact you every time she goes there.
The only other alternative i can see apart from finding her a new home
is to start again as if you had just moved in. Keep her in for a week
and treat her like a queen then try letting her out again and see if she
works, but that really doesn't sound like it would suit her.

--
Badger Badger Badger

Zythophile
December 17th 04, 10:15 PM
"Monique Y. Mudama" > wrote in message
...
>
> Does she wear a collar? Can you somehow attach a little note-vial?
>

I've bought her yet another identity collar with my name & phone no on it.
There's no reason why I couldn't attach a note vial, I think I'll go back to
the pet shop in the morning. Thx for the suggestion.

> Just a (weird) thought. I suppose a GPS unit would be too big for a cat
> to
> carry =P
>

I've thought about this as well; does this mean we're both weird :-) I
remember watching nature documentaries in the '70s when tracking devices
were attached to lions in the Serengeti. Surely they should have been shrunk
to moggie size by now????

--
Z
51° 37' 23" N, 3° 56' 27" W

Zythophile
December 17th 04, 10:20 PM
"BC" > wrote in message
...
> Zythophile wrote:
> This might sound a bit daft but I dont suppose you could do some sort of
> poster to find out whos been feeding her, and then work out if they would
> like to keep her or just contact you every time she goes there.

Doesn't sound daft at all; it's a cracking idea. The only thing is, should I
do it now or wait to see if she goes AWOL again?

> The only other alternative i can see apart from finding her a new home is
> to start again as if you had just moved in. Keep her in for a week and
> treat her like a queen then try letting her out again and see if she
> works, but that really doesn't sound like it would suit her.
>
> --
> Badger Badger Badger

Last time I kept her in for 2 days. This time she's already been kept in for
2 days and I'm intending keeping her indoors until after Xmas, but I feel
really guilty when I let her sister out and she's mewing like crazy to join
her.

--
Z
51° 37' 23" N, 3° 56' 27" W

Zythophile
December 17th 04, 10:21 PM
Monique Y. Mudama" > wrote in message
...
>
> Does she wear a collar? Can you somehow attach a little note-vial?
>

I've bought her yet another identity collar with my name & phone no on it.
There's no reason why I couldn't attach a note vial, I think I'll go back to
the pet shop in the morning. Thx for the suggestion.

> Just a (weird) thought. I suppose a GPS unit would be too big for a cat
> to
> carry =P
>

I've thought about this as well; does this mean we're both weird :-) I
remember watching nature documentaries in the '70s when tracking devices
were attached to lions in the Serengeti. Surely they should have been shrunk
to moggie size by now????

--
Z
51° 37' 23" N, 3° 56' 27" W

Patscga
December 17th 04, 11:50 PM
>- cats are amazingly good at looking after
>themselves and that includes finding someone to feed them and let them curl
>up in front of the fire.

Sure, that's why I have three stray cats who come to eat on my deck every day.
That is until they get run over or attacked by another animal. Get real, lady.
Pat

Zythophile
December 18th 04, 12:39 AM
"Patscga" > wrote in message
...
> I'm
>>beginning to think that I'll just have to try to find a new home for her
>>in
>>the sticks.
>
> For Pete sake, leave the cat alone. Nobody will take in a middle aged
> cat.
> Are you planning on dumping it?
>
>
> Pat

So are you saying when she goes AWOL, I should just ignore it? If so, the
CPL wouldn't agree with you -
http://www.cats.org.uk/html/index.php?sect_id=3#missing.

I have no plans on dumping her. Have I inadvertently offended you in any
way?

--
Z
51° 37' 23" N, 3° 56' 27" W

Zythophile
December 18th 04, 12:41 AM
"Patscga" > wrote in message
...
> >- cats are amazingly good at looking after
>>themselves and that includes finding someone to feed them and let them
>>curl
>>up in front of the fire.
>
> Sure, that's why I have three stray cats who come to eat on my deck every
> day.
> That is until they get run over or attacked by another animal. Get real,
> lady.
> Pat

Pat,

I am sure that you are the sort of responsible person who would take a stray
cat to the vet so that it can be scanned to see if its owner has had it
nicrochipped. BTW, I am real and I'm a bloke.

--
Z
51° 37' 23" N, 3° 56' 27" W

Zythophile
December 18th 04, 01:13 AM
"Zythophile" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Patscga" > wrote in message
> ...
>> >- cats are amazingly good at looking after
>>>themselves and that includes finding someone to feed them and let them
>>>curl
>>>up in front of the fire.
>>
>> Sure, that's why I have three stray cats who come to eat on my deck every
>> day.
>> That is until they get run over or attacked by another animal. Get real,
>> lady.
>> Pat
>
> Pat,
>
> I am sure that you are the sort of responsible person who would take a
> stray cat to the vet so that it can be scanned to see if its owner has had
> it nicrochipped. BTW, I am real and I'm a bloke.
>
> --
> Z
> 51° 37' 23" N, 3° 56' 27" W
Pat,

Just thought you'd like to know, I bought my current house because it is
several hundred metres away from any busy road, so the chances of her
getting run over, although higher than when I lived in the country, are
small. We don't have any large carnvores in the UK, so the greatest threat
to her would be in a literal cat fight. She's young, strong and can easily
hold her own against any other moggie, now that she's carved out her
territory, she's doesn't get involved in fights any more. I may have to
watch this when she gets older though. Although there's a general feeling
around here that foxes can attack cats, I've never actually heard of it
happening and I suspect that foxes would go for easier prey.

Would you be kind enough to explain your earlier comment about my treating
the cat as though she were a feral cat? I've thought about it and I still
don't understand it. I originally asked for any advice on how to discourage
her from straying as I thought other people here might have gone through
similar experiences. Do you have any constructive comments to make? I'd be
glad to read them.

Thanks.

--
Z
51° 37' 23" N, 3° 56' 27" W

Zythophile
December 18th 04, 12:59 PM
"Monique Y. Mudama" > wrote in message
...
> Just a (weird) thought. I suppose a GPS unit would be too big for a cat
> to
> carry =P
>

Ain't Google a wonderful thing? Just found this on
http://www.netcoms.com/iball/newsletter/0303.html
====================
Calling all dog owners! Does the whereabouts of your faithful friend leave
you fretting? Well now, thanks to the latest technology, carefree canines
will have no place to hide.
Dog owners will soon be able to follow their pet's every move on a computer
screen (have they nothing better to do!). Technology originally created to
track endangered animals (and similar to that used by sailors for sea
navigation) is now being made available to the public. British company Oxloc
has developed the technology and formed a miniature version of the tracking
device which can be fitted to the dog's collar and uses Global Positioning
Satellite (GPS) technology to place the pooch to within five metres.

Worried owners can tell the clever device how far their pet is allowed to
roam and if the mischievous mutt jumps the fence and ventures outside the
pre-agreed area, a warning will be sent to a mobile phone via satellite. The
message will inform owners of the speed the animal is travelling and if the
pooch is being pilfered by a high-flying dog-napper, the altitude will even
be communicated! For extra anxious pet owners, the hi-tech device can also
be set so that the exact position of the dog is sent to the owner every
hour.

The tiny, light weight gadget will be available in a matter of months and is
thought to set proud hound owners back a hefty £600, plus a monthly service
charge of £15.

Great for paranoid pet lovers with precious pooches - but we know what you
are thinking.either dog owners themselves should get out more, or can this
chip be inserted into our cheeky children?!

==============

I see no reason why it couldn't work for cats, but at GBP 600 (USD 1165) up
front and GBP 15 (USD 29) per month, the price is seriously prohibitive.

--
Z
51° 37' 23" N, 3° 56' 27" W

BC
December 18th 04, 05:19 PM
Zythophile wrote:
> "BC" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>Zythophile wrote:
>>This might sound a bit daft but I dont suppose you could do some sort of
>>poster to find out whos been feeding her, and then work out if they would
>>like to keep her or just contact you every time she goes there.
>
>
> Doesn't sound daft at all; it's a cracking idea. The only thing is, should I
> do it now or wait to see if she goes AWOL again?

I think If I was you I would wait til she goes AWOL again. Good luck.
Let us know how she gets on when you let her back out.
>
>
>>The only other alternative i can see apart from finding her a new home is
>>to start again as if you had just moved in. Keep her in for a week and
>>treat her like a queen then try letting her out again and see if she
>>works, but that really doesn't sound like it would suit her.
>>
>>--
>>Badger Badger Badger
>
>
> Last time I kept her in for 2 days. This time she's already been kept in for
> 2 days and I'm intending keeping her indoors until after Xmas, but I feel
> really guilty when I let her sister out and she's mewing like crazy to join
> her.
>
Poor thing, just hope she realises that it's all for her own good, I'm
not a fan of indoor cats either, but then I think that is quite a
british way of thinking.

--
Badger Badger Badger

Gee
December 19th 04, 03:28 AM
"BC" > wrote in message news:LvHwd.859

>> Keep her in for a week
> and treat her like a queen then try letting her out again and see if she
> works, but that really doesn't sound like it would suit her.

I read somewhere that outdoor cats usually have more then one home and
sometimes up to 6! There was a court case going somewhere in UK where 2
families fought over a cat as both believed the cat was theirs, while the
cat was happily "living" with both of them :)

So I think you need to fight for her attention really. The above idea is
superb! Keep her indoors, no matter how much she moans, but treat her like a
queen, You need to be associated with everything good in her life:
fantastic delicious food; toys and games;cardboard boxes and stringy toys;
catnip; cat playcenter; lots of scratches on places she likes; NEVER any
yelling or God forbid physical abuse; which I know you don;t this just for
any potential reader in similar situation. Basically you need to create the
positive association with you adn your home, so she'd be back. And she needs
to understand that THIS is her territory and give her incentive to come back
to it. See the other people might give her more milk or fish, or something
she likes. So really just give her what she likes more often. Bribery if you
wish.

You didn't say if she was spayed. Its a must. She will stray less then.

Good luck, let us know how it goes.

Kiwi Gill
December 19th 04, 04:09 AM
"Gee" wrote
> I read somewhere that outdoor cats usually have more then one home and
> sometimes up to 6!

Interesting! I'd be surprised if that was the case in the suburb where I
live, where everyone has a section big enough for a decent garden front and
back. If anything it has the opposite effect - having cats that regularly
patrol their own territory helps keep other cats out. Woe betide any stray
cat that tries to smooch its way into our place!

Kiwi Gill

Zythophile
December 26th 04, 04:58 PM
"Zythophile" > wrote in message
...
> My 5 year old moggie has just developed wanderlust. I moved house about a
> year ago and expected problems then. But she's been fine until about 6
> weeks ago. Now she's gone missing twice in 6 weeks for about 12 days each.
>
> She's been found and returned both times, after a poster campaign by me &
> the kids; the first time by someone about a kilometre away and the second
> time by a neighbour about 50 m away. I live in a city centre, so a 1 km
> radius gives lots of hiding spaces and lots of potential new homes. On
> both occaisions she's returned in good condition and well fed - in fact a
> bit too well fed. I suspect that she's found a second home somewhere.
>
> I've had her microchipped mainly because she loses any collar I put on her
> within a week. In hindsight, I think that was pointless - there are so
> many alley cats around here that if everyone reported every potential
> stray, the RSPCA would be snowed under.
>
> Does anyone have any suggestions to discourage her wandering? She's too
> old and to become a housecat, and to be honest, I've never had a housecat.
> I find it difficult enough to keep the cats indoors for a couple of days
> after they've been in the cattery. The fortnight I had to keep them
> confined to barracks when I moved house was sheer hell for me and I don't
> think they enjoyed it much either.
>
> Any suggestions will be gratefully received.
>
> Z

Oh well, the big day has come. I let her out today. I think it was a big
relief for both of us: I think she was starting to get cabin fever. Her
behaviour was getting more and more erratic. She was constantly mewing at
the door; spitting and hissing at her sister and, when I picked her up a
couple of days ago, she scratched me for the first time ever.

I let her out this morning, in a dusting of snow, and she was like a kitten
again. She was straight up the apple tree and scared the sh*t out of a
robin. She's come back inside now and is curled up on the settee with a
satisfied purr that is rattling the windows.

--
Z
51° 37' 23" N, 3° 56' 27" W