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Christina Websell
December 24th 04, 04:18 AM
It must me a few weeks ago now that I told you I asked my friend to help me
clip Kitty FC's claw since she didn't seem to be able to retract them when
she perched on me and this was exstremely. ouchie.
I also needed her to come to help me trim the spurs of a very old cockerel
whose spurs had got so long that they dug in the ground when he walked, A
very old boy, at least 10, if not 12.
I decided I would catch him and put him in a box half an hour before she
came as the garden is muddy so she didn't have to go down there.
I caught him in his run by shutting the door into his hut so he couldn't
escape. Although I caught him gently he fainted and lost consciousness when
I picked him up and put him into the box. He was afraid. He came to and
seemed okay in a minute or two.
My friend June had come to do the biz with the cock and cat feeties. The
cock was done in five minutes and back to his ladies, walking so much better
with his smaller spurs.
Then it was the turn of KITTY FC to have all her claws clipped. I hoped I
wouldn't have to go so far as to put gloves on. I tried without. I picked
her up from snoozing in front of the fire and fairly quickly we got about 6
of her back claws done. Then she began to growl. We tried to do the other
two claws but she wriggled to get down and threatened to slash.
Bear in mind I need someone to help and I'd got her.
We did the last two back claws and started on the front, very gently
expressing the claws so they could be trimmed. I had only just taken hold
of her front paw when she bit me *very* hard on my index finger, very deep
and it bled for ages.
June told me to wrap her, including her head, in a towel, so I did. It
worked like a charm and she got her front claws clipped with no trouble at
all, in fact she didn't seem to know it was being done.
Kitty had "the hump" for about half an hour, she sulked in the kitchen, but
before June went home she was asking her for skritches

I am the only one who has an owie from this.

Tweed

..





, gentlu

,

polonca12000
December 24th 04, 08:57 PM
Purrs for your finger,
--
Polonca & Soncek

"Christina Websell" > wrote in message
...
> It must me a few weeks ago now that I told you I asked my friend to help
me
> clip Kitty FC's claw since she didn't seem to be able to retract them when
> she perched on me and this was exstremely. ouchie.
<snip>

Christina Websell
December 25th 04, 02:06 AM
"polonca12000" > wrote in message
...
> Purrs for your finger,
> --
> Polonca & Soncek

Thanks, Polonca.
My finger now hurts a lot, is very red and seems to have pus in, Thanks,
Kitty. It was for her benefit so she could meatloaf on my chest without
hurting me!

Tweed






>
> "Christina Websell" > wrote in message
> ...
>> It must me a few weeks ago now that I told you I asked my friend to help
> me
>> clip Kitty FC's claw since she didn't seem to be able to retract them
>> when
>> she perched on me and this was exstremely. ouchie.
> <snip>
>
>

John F. Eldredge
December 29th 04, 05:51 AM
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 01:06:10 -0000, "Christina Websell"
> wrote:

>
>"polonca12000" > wrote in message
...
>> Purrs for your finger,
>> --
>> Polonca & Soncek
>
>Thanks, Polonca.
>My finger now hurts a lot, is very red and seems to have pus in,
>Thanks, Kitty. It was for her benefit so she could meatloaf on my
>chest without hurting me!
>

Hopefully, you will just have a localized infection that will heal
quickly. If you start getting red streaks extending up your arm from
your finger, go to a hospital, as this is a sign of blood poisoning
(septicemia), and can be life-threatening.

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--
John F. Eldredge --
PGP key available from http://pgp.mit.edu
"Reserve your right to think, for even to think wrongly is better
than not to think at all." -- Hypatia of Alexandria

Julie Cook
December 29th 04, 06:13 AM
Christina Websell wrote:


> June told me to wrap her, including her head, in a towel, so I did. It
> worked like a charm and she got her front claws clipped with no trouble at
> all, in fact she didn't seem to know it was being done.
> Kitty had "the hump" for about half an hour, she sulked in the kitchen, but
> before June went home she was asking her for skritches
>
> I am the only one who has an owie from this.
>
> Tweed
>

Christine,

Is your finger all right? Is your finger still swollen and sore? I
realize its been several days since the incident and by now you should
know if it is going to be infected. When I was attempting to rescue
Lacey she bit me, hard, on the joint of my right hand ring finger.
Within 24 hours I was in the hospital on IV antibiotics. The wound bled
like crazy and I really thought it would bleed all the bacteria out. I
also poured alcohol on it every hour but apparently the bacteria found a
nice warm spot in the joint and dug in. My hand swelled up down the
back of my hand and around to my palm. The pain was intense! Earlier
this year Hobbes bit me, accidentally. I didn't wait 24 hour. I called
my doctor and after seeing me I was prescribed amoxycillin. I was
thankful I started early because that wound too became swollen but
didn't get a chance to spread.

Anyhow, purrs for your poor hurting finger and if its still swollen and
sore get thyself to the hooman TED right away. Act aggressively when it
comes to cat bites.

Julie

Howard Berkowitz
December 29th 04, 06:50 AM
In article >, Julie Cook
> wrote:

> Christina Websell wrote:
>
>
> > June told me to wrap her, including her head, in a towel, so I did. It
> > worked like a charm and she got her front claws clipped with no trouble
> > at
> > all, in fact she didn't seem to know it was being done.
> > Kitty had "the hump" for about half an hour, she sulked in the kitchen,
> > but
> > before June went home she was asking her for skritches
> >
> > I am the only one who has an owie from this.
> >
> > Tweed
> >
>
> Christine,
>
> Is your finger all right? Is your finger still swollen and sore? I
> realize its been several days since the incident and by now you should
> know if it is going to be infected. When I was attempting to rescue
> Lacey she bit me, hard, on the joint of my right hand ring finger.
> Within 24 hours I was in the hospital on IV antibiotics. The wound bled
> like crazy and I really thought it would bleed all the bacteria out. I
> also poured alcohol on it every hour but apparently the bacteria found a
> nice warm spot in the joint and dug in.

Unfortunately, alcohol may have made it worse. Most traditional
antiseptics can have a role in preparing unbroken skin for surgery, but,
applied to an open wound, may kill healthy cells and produce better
ground for bacterial growth. There are certain exceptions with specific
drugs, but local treatment is generally not useful for a severe
instructions -- it will need antibiotics by injection or by mouth.

< My hand swelled up down the
> back of my hand and around to my palm. The pain was intense! Earlier
> this year Hobbes bit me, accidentally. I didn't wait 24 hour.

You did absolutely the right thing. Think of how relatively thin the
hand is, and how many nerves and muscles can be damaged quickly. Hand
injuries tend to be considered emergencies more often by physicians than
by patients.

>I called
> my doctor and after seeing me I was prescribed amoxycillin. I was
> thankful I started early because that wound too became swollen but
> didn't get a chance to spread.
>
> Anyhow, purrs for your poor hurting finger and if its still swollen and
> sore get thyself to the hooman TED right away. Act aggressively when it
> comes to cat bites.
>
Incidentally, cat bites tend to be more prone to infection than dog
bites, but human bites are the worst. People sometimes forget that
hitting someone in the mouth and cutting their hand on a tooth, even in
contact sports, is a bite. Human bites really need emergency room
evaluation.

Julie Cook
December 29th 04, 07:01 AM
Howard Berkowitz wrote:

> In article >, Julie Cook
> > wrote:
>
>
>>Christina Websell wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>>June told me to wrap her, including her head, in a towel, so I did. It
>>>worked like a charm and she got her front claws clipped with no trouble
>>>at
>>>all, in fact she didn't seem to know it was being done.
>>>Kitty had "the hump" for about half an hour, she sulked in the kitchen,
>>>but
>>>before June went home she was asking her for skritches
>>>
>>>I am the only one who has an owie from this.
>>>
>>>Tweed
>>>
>>
>>Christine,
>>
>>Is your finger all right? Is your finger still swollen and sore? I
>>realize its been several days since the incident and by now you should
>>know if it is going to be infected. When I was attempting to rescue
>>Lacey she bit me, hard, on the joint of my right hand ring finger.
>>Within 24 hours I was in the hospital on IV antibiotics. The wound bled
>>like crazy and I really thought it would bleed all the bacteria out. I
>>also poured alcohol on it every hour but apparently the bacteria found a
>>nice warm spot in the joint and dug in.
>
>
> Unfortunately, alcohol may have made it worse. Most traditional
> antiseptics can have a role in preparing unbroken skin for surgery, but,
> applied to an open wound, may kill healthy cells and produce better
> ground for bacterial growth. There are certain exceptions with specific
> drugs, but local treatment is generally not useful for a severe
> instructions -- it will need antibiotics by injection or by mouth.
>
> < My hand swelled up down the
>
>>back of my hand and around to my palm. The pain was intense! Earlier
>>this year Hobbes bit me, accidentally. I didn't wait 24 hour.
>
>
> You did absolutely the right thing. Think of how relatively thin the
> hand is, and how many nerves and muscles can be damaged quickly. Hand
> injuries tend to be considered emergencies more often by physicians than
> by patients.
>
>
>>I called
>>my doctor and after seeing me I was prescribed amoxycillin. I was
>>thankful I started early because that wound too became swollen but
>>didn't get a chance to spread.
>>
>>Anyhow, purrs for your poor hurting finger and if its still swollen and
>>sore get thyself to the hooman TED right away. Act aggressively when it
>>comes to cat bites.
>>
>
> Incidentally, cat bites tend to be more prone to infection than dog
> bites, but human bites are the worst. People sometimes forget that
> hitting someone in the mouth and cutting their hand on a tooth, even in
> contact sports, is a bite. Human bites really need emergency room
> evaluation.

The doctor explained to me that dogs bite and tear the skin away,
leaving a lot of bleeding and air. Cats bite and release making puncture
wounds, leaving the bacteria behind. In Lacey's case, she had been
outside. We'd watched her eat birds that were stunned by flying into
glass windows and drinking water with wormy things floating in it. Her
mouth had to have been nasty.

I may be more susceptible to the bacteria of a cats mouth but my motto
is to take no chances. $15 copay at the doctor office is much cheaper
than $200 copay for a hospital stay. Not to mention the cost of my daily
medication that I had brought with me, but ohhh nooo, any meds have to
be dispensed by the Pharmacy and cost 10 x more than the ones I had
brought with me!

Christina Websell
December 29th 04, 04:12 PM
"John F. Eldredge" > wrote in message
...
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
> Hash: SHA1
>
> On Sat, 25 Dec 2004 01:06:10 -0000, "Christina Websell"
> > wrote:
>
>>
>>"polonca12000" > wrote in message
...
>>> Purrs for your finger,
>>> --
>>> Polonca & Soncek
>>
>>Thanks, Polonca.
>>My finger now hurts a lot, is very red and seems to have pus in,
>>Thanks, Kitty. It was for her benefit so she could meatloaf on my
>>chest without hurting me!
>>
>
> Hopefully, you will just have a localized infection that will heal
> quickly. If you start getting red streaks extending up your arm from
> your finger, go to a hospital, as this is a sign of blood poisoning
> (septicemia), and can be life-threatening.
>

Thanks everyone in this thread for your concern. The redness and pus has
gone, and I'm now left with a very tiny dried up puncture wound that I don't
even know I've got unless I touch it and press on it directly.
It was worth it, you know, to get Kitty's claws trimmed. She can meatloaf
on my chest all she wants now (she loves to do this) and also knead (she
loves to do this too) without it being too painful for me to tolerate so I
have to insist she gets down.
She is one happy Kitty.
It was a bit nippy in this room yesterday, it's the one heated by the
woodburner and I can't get more wood until January 4th. I have enough for
today.
If I am cold, I can go into the kitchen where there is a mains gas fire, the
cats spend a lot of time luxuriating in front of it.
However all the nice things - for me - are in *this* room, the television,
the computer etc.

I was in my favourite chair watching the TV with a nice woollen patchwork
blanket over me - made by my aunt - when Kitty came in from the warm kitchen
and said she wanted to get on me. I put the blanket down to my lap and she
got on my chest. She lay down with her head near my chin and began to purr.
I drew the blanket up again so her head was just poking out and there we sat
very comfortable and warm. I could hardly hear the TV over her very loud
purring!
I wondered if she might like it even more if I covered her completely with
the blanket. My whippets used to love being completely covered like this, I
wondered how they could breathe, but somehow they could ;-)
So I pulled the blanket right up to my chin and covered her up. She didn't
like it and stood up. I took it down again to expose her head, expecting
she would settle down again. No, she only allows her meowmie to try and
smother her once...and went off into the kitchen.

Tweed

Monique Y. Mudama
December 30th 04, 01:03 AM
On 2004-12-29, Howard Berkowitz penned:
>
> Unfortunately, alcohol may have made it worse. Most traditional antiseptics
> can have a role in preparing unbroken skin for surgery, but, applied to an
> open wound, may kill healthy cells and produce better ground for bacterial
> growth. There are certain exceptions with specific drugs, but local
> treatment is generally not useful for a severe instructions -- it will need
> antibiotics by injection or by mouth.

Could you elaborate? I mountain bike, which is the same as saying that I
bleed early and often. I've had some really nasty gashes, cuts, and
abrasions, and I have treated them with frequent applications of alcohol or
hydrogen peroxide to try to get the bits of dirt out.

In the interest of full disclosure, I'll admit that I didn't go to the doctor
because my husband told me they would scrub the area with a harsh material to
get all of the dirt bits out. As much as the wound hurt, I couldn't deal with
the idea of having someone scraping at it, so I chose scarring over scrubbing.
The scar is kind of cool looking and has a better story than most of my scars,
which are the result of pure foolishness or clumsiness.

--
monique, who is sometimes allowed to pet Oscar, a grey^H^H^H^Hblue-cream DLH
with an attitude!

Howard Berkowitz
December 30th 04, 01:23 AM
In article >, "Monique Y.
Mudama" > wrote:

> On 2004-12-29, Howard Berkowitz penned:
> >
> > Unfortunately, alcohol may have made it worse. Most traditional
> > antiseptics
> > can have a role in preparing unbroken skin for surgery, but, applied to
> > an
> > open wound, may kill healthy cells and produce better ground for
> > bacterial
> > growth. There are certain exceptions with specific drugs, but local
> > treatment is generally not useful for a severe instructions -- it will
> > need
> > antibiotics by injection or by mouth.
>
> Could you elaborate? I mountain bike, which is the same as saying that I
> bleed early and often. I've had some really nasty gashes, cuts, and
> abrasions, and I have treated them with frequent applications of alcohol
> or
> hydrogen peroxide to try to get the bits of dirt out.

Alcohol and alcohol-based solutions are apt to kill more healthy tissue
than bacteria, and don't have a role in cleaning or treating wounds. One
of the considerations is that alcohol is not a fast-acting disinfectant
-- it needs at least 10 minutes contact to sterilize most things. Yes,
that means that the alcohol swab before an injection isn't sterilizing
anything (although it cleans mechanically, and sometimes helps make a
vein stand out).

Hydrogen peroxide can be useful in cleaning wounds, but the most common
thing used in an emergency room will be a stream of water, from a
syringe or perhaps an IV bag.
>
> In the interest of full disclosure, I'll admit that I didn't go to the
> doctor
> because my husband told me they would scrub the area with a harsh
> material to
> get all of the dirt bits out. As much as the wound hurt, I couldn't deal
> with
> the idea of having someone scraping at it, so I chose scarring over
> scrubbing.

There are times that is necessary, but trauma and plastic surgeons
really try to use the minimum possible force. It's better for healing.
If a flowing stream of water doesn't do it, they may use more compressed
water, such as a stream through a needle or something like a Water-Pik.
Beyond that point, they are going to use pain control measures before
doing anything more invasive, which can be anywhere from a local
anesthetic, to sedation, to more extensive anesthesia, including what
might sound like a contradiction in terms -- self-administered
anesthesia, where you take breaths of nitrous oxide as you feel you need
it.

Before using a scrub brush or gauze, they'd try to pick out any distinct
foreign bodies, with tweezers to start. They may make tiny incisions to
help that, and the sort of blade used is so sharp you may not feel it.
Again, they really, really don't want to be harsh, frankly more for
healing than for comfort.

If you have a thoroughly dirty wound that doesn't yield to this sort of
thing, it may then be quite proper to take you to an operating room
where they have adequate lights and more specialized equipment, as well
as a wider range of choices for pain control -- up to and including
general anesthesia.

> The scar is kind of cool looking and has a better story than most of my
> scars,
> which are the result of pure foolishness or clumsiness.

Part of the treatment choices depends where it is. Hand surgery,
including wound cleaning, is always done with the operator seated and
the arm stretched out. There are specialized regional anesthesia
techniques to block the whole arm; I've watched surgery, fully
conscious, on a nerve in my wrist. To each their own, of course.

Sherry
January 2nd 05, 08:55 AM
>Hydrogen peroxide can be useful in cleaning wounds, but the most common
>thing used in an emergency room will be a stream of water, from a
>syringe or perhaps an IV bag.

Peroxide is good to initially clean a wound, but it shouldn't be used after
that. The way it was explained to me by the doctors at the wound clinic is that
as it kills bacteria, it also kills the healthy cells that are trying to form
to start healing. Daily cleaning with saline and I think the name of the
ointment was Silvadene.
Wound care is an interesting science although I wouldn't want to do it. It was
a sad and creepy place. A lot of diabetics trying to keep from losing limbs.
Sherry
Sherry

Howard Berkowitz
January 2nd 05, 06:52 PM
In article >,
(Sherry ) wrote:

> >Hydrogen peroxide can be useful in cleaning wounds, but the most common
> >thing used in an emergency room will be a stream of water, from a
> >syringe or perhaps an IV bag.
>
> Peroxide is good to initially clean a wound, but it shouldn't be used
> after
> that. The way it was explained to me by the doctors at the wound clinic
> is that
> as it kills bacteria, it also kills the healthy cells that are trying to
> form
> to start healing. Daily cleaning with saline and I think the name of the
> ointment was Silvadene.

Silvadine (silver sulfadiazine) is very useful for certain kinds of
wounds, burns above all. Yes, as Sherry suggests, it also can be useful
in certain hard-to-heal wounds such as pressure sores.

In general, though, the goal in treating wounds is to clean them
thoroughly when first seen. It surprises some people that the staff
will insist on taking some apparently minor wounds to a full operating
room -- such as hand wounds (especially human, and to a lesser extent
animal bites), or stepped-on broken glass.

The reason for doing that is that only with some of the specialized
tools in the OR can the surgeon see and remove all debris. This can
start with additional lighting and the need for general anesthesia so
the patient isn't moving around, but very often can need such things as
an operating microscope. People forget that most glass and plastics, for
example, are not visible on X-ray, and may need painstaking wound
exploration under magnification to get all the pieces. MRI and
ultrasound may help when available; ultrasound (and fluoroscopy when
appropriate) often are in the OR and used during surgery.

In general (burns tend to be an exception because large areas of skin
are gone), the continuing of a care is mostly mechanical, with dressing
changes and washing of selected wounds. Yes, Sulfadene is used in some
cases, as is Betadine. More often, however, if antimicrobial therapy is
needed, it will get into the tissues far better whn given as an
injection or orally.

Depending on where a wound is located, if it's visibly contaminated,
it's not considered overuse of antibiotics to start therapy, sometimes
short-term, to try to knock down the bacteria. Cephalosporins like
Keflex are probably most common, sometimes in combination with
gentamicin or other antibiotics appropriate to the case, and the
infectious organisms that occur locally. Medical practitioners in
different geographic areas should know the most common bacteria and
their sensitivities, which won't be the same everywhere. There's also a
strong clinical distinction between community-acquired infections
(especially pneumonia) and those that apparently start in the hospital.
Hospital-acquired infections tend to have been exposed to a wide range
of antibiotics and are hard to kill.

There. Medical post #1 for 2005! Happy new year to all!


> Wound care is an interesting science although I wouldn't want to do it.
> It was
> a sad and creepy place. A lot of diabetics trying to keep from losing
> limbs.
> Sherry
> Sherry

Yoj
January 3rd 05, 12:57 AM
Thanks for that helpful and informative post, Howard. You sound like an
authority. Are you in the medical profession?

Joy

"Howard Berkowitz" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> (Sherry ) wrote:
>
> > >Hydrogen peroxide can be useful in cleaning wounds, but the most common
> > >thing used in an emergency room will be a stream of water, from a
> > >syringe or perhaps an IV bag.
> >
> > Peroxide is good to initially clean a wound, but it shouldn't be used
> > after
> > that. The way it was explained to me by the doctors at the wound clinic
> > is that
> > as it kills bacteria, it also kills the healthy cells that are trying to
> > form
> > to start healing. Daily cleaning with saline and I think the name of the
> > ointment was Silvadene.
>
> Silvadine (silver sulfadiazine) is very useful for certain kinds of
> wounds, burns above all. Yes, as Sherry suggests, it also can be useful
> in certain hard-to-heal wounds such as pressure sores.
>
> In general, though, the goal in treating wounds is to clean them
> thoroughly when first seen. It surprises some people that the staff
> will insist on taking some apparently minor wounds to a full operating
> room -- such as hand wounds (especially human, and to a lesser extent
> animal bites), or stepped-on broken glass.
>
> The reason for doing that is that only with some of the specialized
> tools in the OR can the surgeon see and remove all debris. This can
> start with additional lighting and the need for general anesthesia so
> the patient isn't moving around, but very often can need such things as
> an operating microscope. People forget that most glass and plastics, for
> example, are not visible on X-ray, and may need painstaking wound
> exploration under magnification to get all the pieces. MRI and
> ultrasound may help when available; ultrasound (and fluoroscopy when
> appropriate) often are in the OR and used during surgery.
>
> In general (burns tend to be an exception because large areas of skin
> are gone), the continuing of a care is mostly mechanical, with dressing
> changes and washing of selected wounds. Yes, Sulfadene is used in some
> cases, as is Betadine. More often, however, if antimicrobial therapy is
> needed, it will get into the tissues far better whn given as an
> injection or orally.
>
> Depending on where a wound is located, if it's visibly contaminated,
> it's not considered overuse of antibiotics to start therapy, sometimes
> short-term, to try to knock down the bacteria. Cephalosporins like
> Keflex are probably most common, sometimes in combination with
> gentamicin or other antibiotics appropriate to the case, and the
> infectious organisms that occur locally. Medical practitioners in
> different geographic areas should know the most common bacteria and
> their sensitivities, which won't be the same everywhere. There's also a
> strong clinical distinction between community-acquired infections
> (especially pneumonia) and those that apparently start in the hospital.
> Hospital-acquired infections tend to have been exposed to a wide range
> of antibiotics and are hard to kill.
>
> There. Medical post #1 for 2005! Happy new year to all!
>
>
> > Wound care is an interesting science although I wouldn't want to do it.
> > It was
> > a sad and creepy place. A lot of diabetics trying to keep from losing
> > limbs.
> > Sherry
> > Sherry

Howard Berkowitz
January 3rd 05, 01:20 AM
In article >, "Yoj"
> wrote:

> Thanks for that helpful and informative post, Howard. You sound like an
> authority. Are you in the medical profession?

Medical informatics and engineering -- I often say "I'm not a doctor,
but I simulate them on computers." I originally started in microbial
biochemistry but drifted to computer science, but continue to subscribe
to journals, go to continuing medical education, etc.

I've found it enormously useful, in developing both hospital and
disaster medical systems, to be able to communicate with the medical
users that I understand what they are trying to accomplish. Some of the
most enjoyable projects are where we try to capture the knowledge and
approach of the best clinicians, so they can be multiplied into
computer-based consulting tools/

>
> Joy
>
> "Howard Berkowitz" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > (Sherry ) wrote:
> >
> > > >Hydrogen peroxide can be useful in cleaning wounds, but the most
> > > >common
> > > >thing used in an emergency room will be a stream of water, from a
> > > >syringe or perhaps an IV bag.
> > >
> > > Peroxide is good to initially clean a wound, but it shouldn't be used
> > > after
> > > that. The way it was explained to me by the doctors at the wound
> > > clinic
> > > is that
> > > as it kills bacteria, it also kills the healthy cells that are trying
> > > to
> > > form
> > > to start healing. Daily cleaning with saline and I think the name of
> > > the
> > > ointment was Silvadene.
> >
> > Silvadine (silver sulfadiazine) is very useful for certain kinds of
> > wounds, burns above all. Yes, as Sherry suggests, it also can be
> > useful
> > in certain hard-to-heal wounds such as pressure sores.
> >
> > In general, though, the goal in treating wounds is to clean them
> > thoroughly when first seen. It surprises some people that the staff
> > will insist on taking some apparently minor wounds to a full operating
> > room -- such as hand wounds (especially human, and to a lesser extent
> > animal bites), or stepped-on broken glass.
> >
> > The reason for doing that is that only with some of the specialized
> > tools in the OR can the surgeon see and remove all debris. This can
> > start with additional lighting and the need for general anesthesia so
> > the patient isn't moving around, but very often can need such things as
> > an operating microscope. People forget that most glass and plastics,
> > for
> > example, are not visible on X-ray, and may need painstaking wound
> > exploration under magnification to get all the pieces. MRI and
> > ultrasound may help when available; ultrasound (and fluoroscopy when
> > appropriate) often are in the OR and used during surgery.
> >
> > In general (burns tend to be an exception because large areas of skin
> > are gone), the continuing of a care is mostly mechanical, with dressing
> > changes and washing of selected wounds. Yes, Sulfadene is used in some
> > cases, as is Betadine. More often, however, if antimicrobial therapy
> > is
> > needed, it will get into the tissues far better whn given as an
> > injection or orally.
> >
> > Depending on where a wound is located, if it's visibly contaminated,
> > it's not considered overuse of antibiotics to start therapy, sometimes
> > short-term, to try to knock down the bacteria. Cephalosporins like
> > Keflex are probably most common, sometimes in combination with
> > gentamicin or other antibiotics appropriate to the case, and the
> > infectious organisms that occur locally. Medical practitioners in
> > different geographic areas should know the most common bacteria and
> > their sensitivities, which won't be the same everywhere. There's also a
> > strong clinical distinction between community-acquired infections
> > (especially pneumonia) and those that apparently start in the hospital.
> > Hospital-acquired infections tend to have been exposed to a wide range
> > of antibiotics and are hard to kill.
> >
> > There. Medical post #1 for 2005! Happy new year to all!
> >
> >
> > > Wound care is an interesting science although I wouldn't want to do
> > > it.
> > > It was
> > > a sad and creepy place. A lot of diabetics trying to keep from losing
> > > limbs.
> > > Sherry
> > > Sherry
>
>