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Denise VanDyke
December 29th 04, 01:53 AM
If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet
"I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay.
Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He
came to fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and
Mom took Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there
is nothing obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway),
his heart rate is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his
anemia is back, and they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called.
She's keeping me in the loop this time. After her last incident, I
informed her that they should keep me informed. lol Thanks in advance.
Probably something simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!

- Denise Brennasmeowmy

CatNipped
December 29th 04, 01:58 AM
Healing purrs coming for your dad.

Hugs,

CatNipped

"Denise VanDyke" > wrote in message
...
> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet
> "I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay.
> Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He
> came to fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and
> Mom took Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there
> is nothing obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway),
> his heart rate is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his
> anemia is back, and they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called.
> She's keeping me in the loop this time. After her last incident, I
> informed her that they should keep me informed. lol Thanks in advance.
> Probably something simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>
>

mlbriggs
December 29th 04, 02:02 AM
On Wed, 29 Dec 2004 00:58:33 +0000, CatNipped wrote:

> Healing purrs coming for your dad.
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped
>
> "Denise VanDyke" > wrote in message
> ...
>> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
>> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet
>> "I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay.
>> Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He
>> came to fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and
>> Mom took Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there
>> is nothing obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway),
>> his heart rate is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his
>> anemia is back, and they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called.
>> She's keeping me in the loop this time. After her last incident, I
>> informed her that they should keep me informed. lol Thanks in advance.
>> Probably something simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!
>>
>> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>>
>>
Purring for a quick and complete recovery. MLB

Karen Chuplis
December 29th 04, 02:10 AM
in article , Denise VanDyke at
wrote on 12/28/04 6:53 PM:

> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet
> "I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay.
> Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He
> came to fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and
> Mom took Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there
> is nothing obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway),
> his heart rate is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his
> anemia is back, and they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called.
> She's keeping me in the loop this time. After her last incident, I
> informed her that they should keep me informed. lol Thanks in advance.
> Probably something simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>
>
Purrs for something silly like he forgot to eat. Keep us posted!

Sheenah
December 29th 04, 02:14 AM
"Denise VanDyke" > wrote in message
...
> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the
vet
> "I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the
hay.
> Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part.
He
> came to fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom
and
> Mom took Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but
there
> is nothing obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low
anyway),
> his heart rate is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his
> anemia is back, and they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom
called.
> She's keeping me in the loop this time. After her last incident,
I
> informed her that they should keep me informed. lol Thanks in
advance.
> Probably something simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>
I've fingers crossed for there to be a simple explanation which gives
no-one cause to have concerns for his health.

Sheenah

Monique Y. Mudama
December 29th 04, 02:18 AM
On 2004-12-29, Denise VanDyke penned:
> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet "I
> feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay. Dad
> passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He came to
> fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and Mom took Dad
> to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there is nothing
> obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway), his heart rate is
> fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his anemia is back, and they
> were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called. She's keeping me in the loop
> this time. After her last incident, I informed her that they should keep me
> informed. lol Thanks in advance. Probably something simple, knock wood,
> but purrs always help!

Definitely sending purrs!

I hope it turns out to be nothing at all.

--
monique, who is sometimes allowed to pet Oscar, a grey^H^H^H^Hblue-cream DLH
with an attitude!

Yoj
December 29th 04, 02:50 AM
Purrs are on their way. Keep us posted.

Joy


"Denise VanDyke" > wrote in message
...
> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet
> "I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay.
> Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He
> came to fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and
> Mom took Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there
> is nothing obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway),
> his heart rate is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his
> anemia is back, and they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called.
> She's keeping me in the loop this time. After her last incident, I
> informed her that they should keep me informed. lol Thanks in advance.
> Probably something simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>
>

Sam Nash
December 29th 04, 05:11 AM
"Denise VanDyke" > wrote in message
...
> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet "I
> feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay. Dad
> passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He came to
> fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and Mom took
> Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there is nothing
> obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway), his heart rate
> is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his anemia is back, and
> they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called. She's keeping me in
> the loop this time. After her last incident, I informed her that they
> should keep me informed. lol Thanks in advance. Probably something
> simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>
Big-time purrs on the way for your Dad's episode to be nothing to worry
about.
Sam

Julie Cook
December 29th 04, 05:15 AM
Denise VanDyke wrote:
> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet
> "I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay.
> Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He
> came to fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and
> Mom took Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there
> is nothing obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway),
> his heart rate is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his
> anemia is back, and they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called.
> She's keeping me in the loop this time. After her last incident, I
> informed her that they should keep me informed. lol Thanks in advance.
> Probably something simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>
>
Purrs on the way for your Dad, Denise. I hope that it is something
easily diagnosed and treated.

Julie, Hobbes, Selena, Lacey and Sam

Dan M
December 29th 04, 05:48 AM
> Purrs on the way for your Dad, Denise. I hope that it is something
> easily diagnosed and treated.
>
> Julie, Hobbes, Selena, Lacey and Sam

We second that.

Dan and Harri Roadcat

jmcquown
December 29th 04, 02:55 PM
Denise VanDyke wrote:
> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the
> vet "I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to
> the hay. Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that
> part. He came to fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet
> got Mom and Mom took Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of
> tests, but there is nothing obvious yet.
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy

Purrs on the way from Persia and birdie chirps from Peaches.

Jill

Christine Burel
December 29th 04, 05:12 PM
Many purrs for your Dad!
Christine
"Denise VanDyke" > wrote in message
...
> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet
> "I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay.
> Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He
> came to fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and
> Mom took Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there
> is nothing obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway),
> his heart rate is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his
> anemia is back, and they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called.
> She's keeping me in the loop this time. After her last incident, I
> informed her that they should keep me informed. lol Thanks in advance.
> Probably something simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>
>

Denise VanDyke
December 29th 04, 05:30 PM
Well, the hospital let him go home around 6:30 last night. He says he's
fine. They say they couldn't find anything wrong. He's to see his
doctor as soon as possible, and they recommended that he be put on a
heart monitor for a few days just to make sure that there isn't
something transitory going on there. His brother has a problem with a
randomly slowed heartrate, so there is a definite possibility. But he
got home in time to watch Oregon State beat Notre Dame last night. So
that made him happy. Although he keeps telling Mom not to fuss. Just
because he has to "be a guy" (no offense meant to the menfolks here) and
macho through stuff... sigh. Mom made him go to the hospital. The vet
and Mom made him not walk uphill to the car. Mom told him that the
going inside the ER in a wheelchair was so he'd be seen sooner. Geez.
<rolling eyes> I figure the purrs helped, if not with the finding out
what happened, then with the making him feel better. Thanks, everyone!

- Denise Brennasmeowmy

Ann
December 29th 04, 05:46 PM
Purrs on the way.
Ann
"Denise VanDyke" > wrote in message
...
> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet "I
> feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay. Dad
> passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He came to
> fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and Mom took
> Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there is nothing
> obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway), his heart rate
> is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his anemia is back, and
> they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called. She's keeping me in
> the loop this time. After her last incident, I informed her that they
> should keep me informed. lol Thanks in advance. Probably something
> simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>
>

Karen
December 29th 04, 05:54 PM
"Denise VanDyke" > wrote in message
...
> Well, the hospital let him go home around 6:30 last night. He says he's
> fine. They say they couldn't find anything wrong. He's to see his
> doctor as soon as possible, and they recommended that he be put on a
> heart monitor for a few days just to make sure that there isn't
> something transitory going on there. His brother has a problem with a
> randomly slowed heartrate, so there is a definite possibility. But he
> got home in time to watch Oregon State beat Notre Dame last night. So
> that made him happy. Although he keeps telling Mom not to fuss. Just
> because he has to "be a guy" (no offense meant to the menfolks here) and
> macho through stuff... sigh. Mom made him go to the hospital. The vet
> and Mom made him not walk uphill to the car. Mom told him that the
> going inside the ER in a wheelchair was so he'd be seen sooner. Geez.
> <rolling eyes> I figure the purrs helped, if not with the finding out
> what happened, then with the making him feel better. Thanks, everyone!
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>
>

Hmm. I"m glad they don't think it is anything serious, but, geez, isn't it
kind of frustrating when they never find anything? I hope he takes them up
on the heart monitor thing for a few days, just to get a baseline on the
behaviour of it if nothing else.

Irulan
December 29th 04, 06:35 PM
Denise, we will purr and pray that your Dad is ok.
Jazz & his mama

--

Irulan
from the stars we come
to the stars we return
from now until the end of time
"Denise VanDyke" > wrote in message
...
> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet "I
> feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay. Dad
> passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He came to
> fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and Mom took
> Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there is nothing
> obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway), his heart rate
> is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his anemia is back, and
> they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called. She's keeping me in
> the loop this time. After her last incident, I informed her that they
> should keep me informed. lol Thanks in advance. Probably something
> simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>
>

Tanada
December 29th 04, 07:15 PM
Denise VanDyke wrote:

> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet
> "I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay.
> Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He
> came to fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and
> Mom took Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there
> is nothing obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway),
> his heart rate is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his
> anemia is back, and they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called.
> She's keeping me in the loop this time. After her last incident, I
> informed her that they should keep me informed. lol Thanks in advance.
> Probably something simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!
>


Purrs and healing thoughts and wishes going out for your dad from all of
us here.

Pam, Rob, and the Fayetteville Five + Mozart the kamikaze kitten and
Speedy the d-thing

Howard Berkowitz
December 30th 04, 12:21 AM
In article >, Denise VanDyke
> wrote:

> Well, the hospital let him go home around 6:30 last night. He says he's
> fine. They say they couldn't find anything wrong. He's to see his
> doctor as soon as possible, and they recommended that he be put on a
> heart monitor for a few days just to make sure that there isn't
> something transitory going on there. His brother has a problem with a
> randomly slowed heartrate, so there is a definite possibility. But he
> got home in time to watch Oregon State beat Notre Dame last night. So
> that made him happy. Although he keeps telling Mom not to fuss. Just
> because he has to "be a guy" (no offense meant to the menfolks here) and
> macho through stuff... sigh. Mom made him go to the hospital. The vet
> and Mom made him not walk uphill to the car. Mom told him that the
> going inside the ER in a wheelchair was so he'd be seen sooner. Geez.
> <rolling eyes> I figure the purrs helped, if not with the finding out
> what happened, then with the making him feel better. Thanks, everyone!
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>
>

Purrs indeed.

24-hour cardiac monitoring is a very reasonable idea. Modern Holter
monitors are quite small -- the wires and patches are more inconvenient
than the monitor. I've let the corner of a shirt hang out, and just
stuck the recorder in a pocket. Typically, you need to go to a
cardiologist to get one.

They have a push button that will flag the recording at any point, and
the patient should push it whenever ANYTHING feels strange. Listening to
your body and pushing it even when you're not sure anything is going on
is one of the best ways to be sure potentially important data is noticed
-- or, for that matter, getting confirmation the heart is NOT the
problem when something feels odd. Negative information on one organ can
be very valuable in focusing the diagnosis.

Given the family history, this makes a good deal of sense. I have a
condition where my heart would stop for 3-10 seconds, only while I
slept. It was rather frustrating, during one hospital diagnostic stay,
to have an incredibly beautiful nurse shake me awake at 4 AM, with my
first impression being she was yelling "I want you."

It turned out she was yelling "I want you to wake up and stay awake
until a cardiologist sees you." Not a loss, however -- it was at the NIH
Clinical Center and I was the only patient on the unit, so we sat up and
swapped medical jokes for a couple of hours.

Repeated heart pauses over 3 seconds call for a pacemaker, which I got a
few weeks later. Inserting a modern pacemaker is a very minor procedure
-- there are places where it's done as an office procedure, but it's
more common to have an overnight stay just in case anything leaks. I was
fully conscious while having it inserted under a local anesthetic, and
had enough of a conversation with the subspecialist doing it to decide
he was personally obnoxious, and I had my regular cardiologist take me
back for the evening.

Denise VanDyke
December 30th 04, 12:57 AM
Howard Berkowitz wrote:
> In article >, Denise VanDyke
> > wrote:
>
>
>>Well, the hospital let him go home around 6:30 last night. He says he's
>>fine. They say they couldn't find anything wrong. He's to see his
>>doctor as soon as possible, and they recommended that he be put on a
>>heart monitor for a few days just to make sure that there isn't
>>something transitory going on there. His brother has a problem with a
>>randomly slowed heartrate, so there is a definite possibility. But he
>>got home in time to watch Oregon State beat Notre Dame last night. So
>>that made him happy. Although he keeps telling Mom not to fuss. Just
>>because he has to "be a guy" (no offense meant to the menfolks here) and
>>macho through stuff... sigh. Mom made him go to the hospital. The vet
>>and Mom made him not walk uphill to the car. Mom told him that the
>>going inside the ER in a wheelchair was so he'd be seen sooner. Geez.
>><rolling eyes> I figure the purrs helped, if not with the finding out
>>what happened, then with the making him feel better. Thanks, everyone!
>>
>>- Denise Brennasmeowmy
>>
>>
>
>
> Purrs indeed.
>
> 24-hour cardiac monitoring is a very reasonable idea. Modern Holter
> monitors are quite small -- the wires and patches are more inconvenient
> than the monitor. I've let the corner of a shirt hang out, and just
> stuck the recorder in a pocket. Typically, you need to go to a
> cardiologist to get one.
>
> They have a push button that will flag the recording at any point, and
> the patient should push it whenever ANYTHING feels strange. Listening to
> your body and pushing it even when you're not sure anything is going on
> is one of the best ways to be sure potentially important data is noticed
> -- or, for that matter, getting confirmation the heart is NOT the
> problem when something feels odd. Negative information on one organ can
> be very valuable in focusing the diagnosis.
>
> Given the family history, this makes a good deal of sense. I have a
> condition where my heart would stop for 3-10 seconds, only while I
> slept. It was rather frustrating, during one hospital diagnostic stay,
> to have an incredibly beautiful nurse shake me awake at 4 AM, with my
> first impression being she was yelling "I want you."
>
> It turned out she was yelling "I want you to wake up and stay awake
> until a cardiologist sees you." Not a loss, however -- it was at the NIH
> Clinical Center and I was the only patient on the unit, so we sat up and
> swapped medical jokes for a couple of hours.
>
> Repeated heart pauses over 3 seconds call for a pacemaker, which I got a
> few weeks later. Inserting a modern pacemaker is a very minor procedure
> -- there are places where it's done as an office procedure, but it's
> more common to have an overnight stay just in case anything leaks. I was
> fully conscious while having it inserted under a local anesthetic, and
> had enough of a conversation with the subspecialist doing it to decide
> he was personally obnoxious, and I had my regular cardiologist take me
> back for the evening.

Thanks, Howard. My uncle has some sort of pacemaker, but IIRC they had
to try a couple different types to make sure he had the right one for
his problem. I think his problem is that his heart randomly changes
speed, so they had to find one that would handle all the variations he
needs. With it, he's been able to resume volunteering for Habitat for
Humanity, travelling across the country and doing mini missions through
their church down in Mexico. I'm almost hoping that it's something like
that. Or at least something easily dealt with.

- Denise

Howard Berkowitz
December 30th 04, 01:11 AM
In article >, Denise VanDyke
> wrote:

> Thanks, Howard. My uncle has some sort of pacemaker, but IIRC they had
> to try a couple different types to make sure he had the right one for
> his problem. I think his problem is that his heart randomly changes
> speed, so they had to find one that would handle all the variations he
> needs. With it, he's been able to resume volunteering for Habitat for
> Humanity, travelling across the country and doing mini missions through
> their church down in Mexico. I'm almost hoping that it's something like
> that. Or at least something easily dealt with.

Pacemakers are constantly improving and getting smaller. The trend is to
put a wide range of functions into the same unit so there's little need
for changing the physical device -- they are externally programmable
through a transmitter placed on your chest, and they do contain
computers that can sense not just your heartbeat characteristic but
motion, oxygen level, etc., and set the rate to match your needs of the
moment.

While it wasn't the standard in the past, now pacemakers are usually
connected to two chambers on one side of the heart, making them much
more flexible. There are still some special options, such as building in
a defibrillator. There's also a new, still somewhat experimental
procedure where the same chamber on both sides of the heart is paced.
Neither are likely to be needed for something like your uncle has.

Elise
December 30th 04, 01:40 AM
"Sam Nash" > wrote in message
...
> "Denise VanDyke" > wrote in message
> ...
>> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
>> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet
>> "I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay.
>> Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He came
>> to fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and Mom
>> took Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there is
>> nothing obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway), his
>> heart rate is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his anemia is
>> back, and they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called. She's
>> keeping me in the loop this time. After her last incident, I informed
>> her that they should keep me informed. lol Thanks in advance. Probably
>> something simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!
>>
>> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>>
> Big-time purrs on the way for your Dad's episode to be nothing to worry
> about.
> Sam

Missed the OP. Purrs for your Dad that it's nothing to worry about and
easily treated
--
Elise (supervised by Gossamer & Jeeves)
pics:

William Hamblen
December 30th 04, 03:26 AM
On Wed, 29 Dec 2004 08:30:01 -0800, Denise VanDyke
> wrote:

>Well, the hospital let him go home around 6:30 last night. He says he's
>fine. They say they couldn't find anything wrong. He's to see his
>doctor as soon as possible, and they recommended that he be put on a
>heart monitor for a few days just to make sure that there isn't
>something transitory going on there.

Heart monitors can be a little hit or miss. Often nothing happens
while you're wearing it. Pacemakers work very well with many types of
heart rhythm problems. My own mother has made it to 96 with a
therapeutic pacemaker in her.

Krista
December 30th 04, 07:58 AM
Denise VanDyke wrote:
> Well, the hospital let him go home around 6:30 last night. He says
he's
> fine.
(snippety)

I'm glad it appears to be nothing serious; I saw your update before
your original post. We are sending just-in-case purrs your dad's way.
------
Krista

polonca12000
December 30th 04, 12:24 PM
Lots of purrs for your dad and hugs for the rest of his worried family,
--
Polonca & Soncek

"Denise VanDyke" > wrote in message
...
> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet
> "I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay.
> Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part.
<snip>>
Probably something simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy
>
>

Adrian
December 30th 04, 04:34 PM
Denise VanDyke wrote:
> If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
> afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the
> vet "I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to
> the hay. Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that
> part. He came to fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet
> got Mom and Mom took Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of
> tests, but there is nothing obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs
> kind of low anyway), his heart rate is fine, his EKG was fine,
> they'll know soon if his anemia is back, and they were about to do
> chest x-rays when Mom called. She's keeping me in the loop this
> time. After her last incident, I informed her that they should keep
> me informed. lol Thanks in advance. Probably something simple,
> knock wood, but purrs always help!
>
> - Denise Brennasmeowmy

Purrs on the way for your Dad.
--
Adrian (Owned by Snoopy & Bagheera)
A house is not a home, without a cat.

Steve Touchstone
December 31st 04, 11:52 AM
On Tue, 28 Dec 2004 16:53:08 -0800, Denise VanDyke
> wrote:

>If it isn't one thing, it's another. Dad was down in the barn this
>afternoon watching the vet trim the sheeps' hooves. He said to the vet
>"I feel kind of dizzy" and the vet rushed over and eased him to the hay.
> Dad passed out momentarily, and now doesn't remember that part. He
>came to fairly quickly, but was in a cold sweat, so the vet got Mom and
>Mom took Dad to the ER. They are running all kinds of tests, but there
>is nothing obvious yet. His BP is fine (he runs kind of low anyway),
>his heart rate is fine, his EKG was fine, they'll know soon if his
>anemia is back, and they were about to do chest x-rays when Mom called.
> She's keeping me in the loop this time. After her last incident, I
>informed her that they should keep me informed. lol Thanks in advance.
> Probably something simple, knock wood, but purrs always help!

Purrs on the way
--
Steve Touchstone,
faithful servant of Sammy, Little Bit and Rocky (RB)

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