PDA

View Full Version : How cold of temperature can cats stand?


Greg R
January 16th 05, 04:29 AM
How cold of temperature can cats stand?

I got a stay cat that comes in and stays in during the day but wants
out at night even when it is cold out. Yes, we do have cat houses
outside for him. (Actual he is our cat now. We got him his shots)
I think he likes to roam at night

Greg R

Margaret
January 16th 05, 05:01 AM
On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 22:29:36 -0500, Greg R wrote:

/snip/

> I got a stay cat that comes in and stays in during the day but wants
> out at night even when it is cold out. Yes, we do have cat houses
> outside for him. (Actual he is our cat now. We got him his shots)
> I think he likes to roam at night


Sounds like he's used to the local temperatures and knows what he's doing.
If the outside cat house is heated or he has a cat door to come into the
main house any time, then it can be his decision most of the time. If
there's really bad weather he should probably stay in because he might get
stranded by water or ice and snow and could not get back. Even in clear
weather if he got icy paws I'd keep him in. If there are other dangers in
your neighborhood, they might all become worse in bad weather.

Things would be different with a house cat or if you had just moved to a
colder climate. They shouldn't spend much time out in cold even if they want
to, till they have had several months to adjust gradually, grow thicker fur,
and get plump.


Margaret

Zythophile
January 18th 05, 11:28 PM
"Greg R" > wrote in message
...
> How cold of temperature can cats stand?
>
> I got a stay cat that comes in and stays in during the day but wants
> out at night even when it is cold out. Yes, we do have cat houses
> outside for him. (Actual he is our cat now. We got him his shots)
> I think he likes to roam at night
>
> Greg R

I don't think temperature is a problem for most cats. Mine are both ok with
sub-zero (Celsius) not that we get many days like that. What would concern
me more is the cat going out at night. Night time is when cats are most
likely to get run over, stolen or in a scrap with a fox or stray dog (or
whatever your local fauna might be). I'd try to get him to go out during the
day and come in at night, if possible. Has he been neutered? If not, getting
him neutered might quell his nocturnal wanderlust, as well as keeping the
feral feline population down. i assume that when you got his vaccination,
the vet scanned for microchips?
--
Z
www.makepovertyhistory.org

mlbriggs
January 19th 05, 01:56 AM
On Sat, 15 Jan 2005 22:29:36 -0500, Greg R wrote:

> How cold of temperature can cats stand?
>
> I got a stay cat that comes in and stays in during the day but wants
> out at night even when it is cold out. Yes, we do have cat houses
> outside for him. (Actual he is our cat now. We got him his shots)
> I think he likes to roam at night
>
> Greg R


A few years ago when this condo area had quite a few feral cats, we had a
lot of snow and unusual cold weather. In the Spring we found the frozen
bodies of several cats that had taken shelter in the ditches.

Ted Davis
January 23rd 05, 01:39 AM
On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 14:40:41 -0500, "cagney" >
wrote:

>If it is too cold for you then it's too
>cold for them. Remember frost bite
>happens fast.

That's misleading. I've been outside in -24/-31 F/C, wind chill
-79/-61 F/C, but I doubt any cat would be stupid enough to *go* out in
that - of course, I was able to put on rather a lot of clothing and
cover my face with a wind proof plastic shield.

On the other hand, one of the cats that has been out for hours just
came in - it's 15/-9.4 F/C outside, wind chill 0/-18 F/C. I think
several more are still outside. Without putting on heavy clothing,
I'd die fairly quickly out there.

I should note that my cats can come and go as they please through a
cat flap next to the back door. (Another slightly damp, cool feeling
cat just came into the computer room.)

My observation is that cats will go out hunting from an hour or so
before sunset to a couple of hours after, and a couple of hours before
sunrise to an hour or so after, almost regardless of the temperature
(another cool, damp cat - Fleagor this time - just jumped into my lap;
hunting time is over) as long as it is above the temperature at which
snow becomes crunchy (around what the wind chill is now).


--
T.E.D. )

Nell
January 27th 05, 12:31 AM
> Even in clear weather if he got icy paws I'd keep him in.

I'm letting my kittens (6 months old) out now for the first time but
only with me present, i.e. I do a couple of hours' gardening in the
afternoon and they play vaguely within my vicinity.

What I would like to add is this. When I go out now (late January) and
start picking weeds etc my hands almost "freeze" but this feeling only
lasts for about 15 minutes: the exertion of physical work, exercise, and
play outside warms you up and very soon you don't feel anything. I
think this is the same with the cats. If they just stood and watched me
they would get a chill. But, of course, they don't: they're flying all
over the place and when we go in at 5, for their tea, they are
exhilarated, with no sign of shudders or being out of sorts.

Nell.