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Tim Smith
February 7th 05, 04:35 AM
There is a possibility we will be moving to the states this year and I
was wondering what I need to do to get my cats residence (or a visa
which will last their lifetime). Do they need to swear allegience
somewhere or learn the national anthem?

No seriously, apart from getting vaccinations up to date, do I need to
do anything else to get my kitties into the US?

thanks

Thomas Smith
February 17th 05, 06:25 AM
"Tim Smith" > wrote in message
om...
> There is a possibility we will be moving to the states this year and I
> was wondering what I need to do to get my cats residence (or a visa
> which will last their lifetime). Do they need to swear allegience
> somewhere or learn the national anthem?
>
> No seriously, apart from getting vaccinations up to date, do I need to
> do anything else to get my kitties into the US?
>
> thanks

You should contact the U.S. Embassy for more information. You are probably
going to need an animal import license from the Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service in the U.S. Department of Agriculture. You might want to
check out the U.S. Embassy's website at
www.usembassycanada.gov/content/index.asp. The mailing address is as
follows;

Information Resource Center
U.S. Embassy
PO Box 866, Station B
Ottawa, ON K1P 5T1
Canada

The phone number for information is (613) 688-5311, the fax number is (613)
688-3101, and the contact e-mail address is .

You might also find some useful information at www.aphis.usda.gov. Your vet
should have some information on the procedures, too.

Also, some states, such as Hawaii, may impose a quarantine on animals
arriving from other places. The U.S. Embassy should be able to let you know
what the local laws will be where you plan on relocating to.

--
I'm Tom Smith, and I approved this message.

Thomas Smith
February 17th 05, 06:33 AM
Just after I posted this, I found this information.

BEGIN QUOTE

Importation of Pets and Other Animals Into the United States

CATS AND DOGS

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has regulations on the
importation of dogs and cats into the United States. In general, they
require that dogs be vaccinated against rabies at least 30 days prior to
entry, except for puppies younger than 3 months and dogs originated or
located for 6 months in areas considered to be free of rabies. A dog with an
unexpired health certificate meets these requirements. We strongly suggest
you visit the CDC web site at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dq/animal.htm or
call them at (404) 498-1670 or (404) 498-1600, for more information on their
regulations. There is no vaccination regulation for cats.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has certain restrictions on the
importation of dogs. Collies, shepherds, and other dogs that are imported
from any part of the world except Canada, Mexico, and regions of Central
America and the West Indies and that are to be used in the handling of
livestock must be inspected and quarantined at the port of entry for a
sufficient time to determine their freedom from tapeworm.

In order to expedite entry into the United States, we suggest that you do
not use straw, hay, grass, or other natural bedding. Our Plant Protection
and Quarantine Division does not allow the importation of these materials as
they may harbor various plant pests.

We also suggest you contact your State, county, municipal authorities for
local restrictions on importing dogs. Some airlines require health
certificates for dogs traveling with them. You should contact the airlines
prior to your travel date.

Cats and dogs being imported into Hawaii will be quarantined for 130 days.
Please visit the website for the Hawaii Dept. of Agriculture at:
http://www.hawaiiag.org/hdoa/doa_importing.htm

All cats and dogs are subject to inspection at ports of entry for evidence
of infectious diseases that can be transmitted to humans.

As a help to both domestic and international travelers, The American Society
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals web site has a wealth of pertinent
information.


Special Circumstances

Dogs imported from countries or regions where screwworm is know to exist may
be imported if they meet the following requirements:

The dog must be accompanied by a certificate signed by a full-time salaried
veterinary official of the region of origin stating that the dog has been
inspected for screwworm within 5 days prior to shipment to the United
States.
The certificate must state that the dog is either free from screwworm or was
found to be infested with screwworm and was held in quarantine and treated
until free from screwworm prior to leaving the region.
Owners of dogs imported from countries or regions affected with
Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) are advised to take the following precautions
to prevent the introduction of FMD from pets entering the United States:

The feet, fur, and bedding of the pets should be free of any excessive dirt
or mud.
The pet's bedding should be free of any straw or hay, or other natural
bedding.
The pet should be bathed as soon as it reaches its final destination.
The pet should be kept separate and apart from all livestock for at least 5
days after entry into the United States.
If you need more information contact the Import Animals Program at (301)
734-3277.

END QUOTE

Source: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/ncie/pet-info.html

--
I'm Tom Smith, and I approved this message.

"Thomas Smith" -NO-SPAM> wrote in message
...
>
>
> "Tim Smith" > wrote in message
> om...
> > There is a possibility we will be moving to the states this year and I
> > was wondering what I need to do to get my cats residence (or a visa
> > which will last their lifetime). Do they need to swear allegience
> > somewhere or learn the national anthem?
> >
> > No seriously, apart from getting vaccinations up to date, do I need to
> > do anything else to get my kitties into the US?
> >
> > thanks
>
> You should contact the U.S. Embassy for more information. You are
probably
> going to need an animal import license from the Animal and Plant Health
> Inspection Service in the U.S. Department of Agriculture. You might want
to
> check out the U.S. Embassy's website at
> www.usembassycanada.gov/content/index.asp. The mailing address is as
> follows;
>
> Information Resource Center
> U.S. Embassy
> PO Box 866, Station B
> Ottawa, ON K1P 5T1
> Canada
>
> The phone number for information is (613) 688-5311, the fax number is
(613)
> 688-3101, and the contact e-mail address is .
>
> You might also find some useful information at www.aphis.usda.gov. Your
vet
> should have some information on the procedures, too.
>
> Also, some states, such as Hawaii, may impose a quarantine on animals
> arriving from other places. The U.S. Embassy should be able to let you
know
> what the local laws will be where you plan on relocating to.
>
> --
> I'm Tom Smith, and I approved this message.
>
>

L. Ron Waddle
February 18th 05, 07:44 AM
On 2005-02-17, Thomas Smith -NO-SPAM> wrote:

> "Tim Smith" > wrote in message
> om...
>> There is a possibility we will be moving to the states this year and I
>> was wondering what I need to do to get my cats residence (or a visa
>> which will last their lifetime). Do they need to swear allegience
>> somewhere or learn the national anthem?
>>
>> No seriously, apart from getting vaccinations up to date, do I need to
>> do anything else to get my kitties into the US?
>
> You should contact the U.S. Embassy for more information. You are probably

U.S. Customs may have more accurate information.

> going to need an animal import license from the Animal and Plant Health
> Inspection Service in the U.S. Department of Agriculture. You might want to

No, that is only for commercial animals, not for personal companion
animals (cats and dogs). Personal companion animals are examined by
the U.S. Public Health Service at the border for evidence of disease,
but otherwise do not need to get any kind of import license. It is
advisable to get a health certificate from your veterinarian dated not
more than 30 days prior to crossing the border, but it is not required
(but it can be helpful in avoiding a prolonged exam, and if you fly
the animal back to Canada, the airline will most likely require that
certificate). Cats do not require rabies certificates for entry into
the U.S. (dogs do) but it is advisable to do so anyhow because you'll
need said certificate to get the cat back into Canada. For re-entry
into Canada the animal will need a rabies certificate dated at least
30 days prior to entry and that is not yet expired, see Canadian
customs for more info. The U.S. Center for Disease Control's companion
animal import web page is at

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dq/animal.htm

I know people (snowbirds) who regularly cross the border between the
U.S. and Canada in their RV's with their companion animals. They have
no problem doing so, all they do is show their rabies certificates
when crossing the border and that is pretty much it.

> Also, some states, such as Hawaii, may impose a quarantine on animals
> arriving from other places. The U.S. Embassy should be able to let you know
> what the local laws will be where you plan on relocating to.

Cats arriving in Hawaii or Guam, both of which are free of rabies, are
subject to that state/territory's quarantine requirements, so that is
definitely of interest. The rabies certificates will likely prove useful
there.

- Elron

Karen M.
February 22nd 05, 10:18 PM
Tim Smith wrote:
> There is a possibility we will be moving to the states this year and
I
> was wondering what I need to do to get my cats residence (or a visa
> which will last their lifetime). Do they need to swear allegience
> somewhere or learn the national anthem?
>
> No seriously, apart from getting vaccinations up to date, do I need
to
> do anything else to get my kitties into the US?

When I drove home (to Mich) from upstate NY with my brand-new
street-find kitten, Customs just did the standard questions. IIRC they
asked if I'd bought anything and I held up my fast food drink cup. The
new kid was on my lap and staring at them through the driver window.

'Course that was almost 13 years ago, i.e. way prior to a certain
event that took place in September 2001.

HTH
--Karen M.

yvonnec
March 30th 05, 03:28 AM
nop Just make a sure they have their shots up to date and are wearing a tag
and have the vet papers hand at the border.
Yvonne
"Tim Smith" > wrote in message
om...
> There is a possibility we will be moving to the states this year and I
> was wondering what I need to do to get my cats residence (or a visa
> which will last their lifetime). Do they need to swear allegience
> somewhere or learn the national anthem?
>
> No seriously, apart from getting vaccinations up to date, do I need to
> do anything else to get my kitties into the US?
>
> thanks