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View Full Version : What's worse than pilling a cat - giving eyedrops!


March 30th 05, 08:21 PM
Current 3 out of 4 of us have conjunctivitis - that's me, Thenie and
Cindy (Motley the tortie terror is fine, but will probably end up with
gummy eyes). Dr Vet has kindly prescribed 2 sets of drops -
antibiotics (5 days) and anti-inflammatory (2 days) both 3 times daily.
Now I thought that pilling a cat could be difficult, but at least you
can appeal to a cat's greed and hide a pill in something yummy.
Eyedrops are much, much worse, especially when you're a single
kitty-mother and you have to manage the restraint part as well as
aiming the drop at the right place.

So far I've done 2 doses per cat and my hands tell the story of each
dose. Thenie the 6 year old was okay. For a "hunting, shooting and
fishing" country cat that regularly brings home mice and pigeons (but
never saves any pigeon for the rest of us) she is very mellow about
having drops put in. She grumps about it, but soon forgives and just
wants a cuddle.

Cindy the 14 year old has already remodelled several of my fingers. Dr
Vet removed most of her teeth 6 years ago (chronic gingivitis), but
thoughtfully left an upper and lower fang that meet. And they meet
through flesh as well, or at least through the web between thumb and
forefinger. Her claws are like little razors. Worse, I feel so guilty
as she sulks for ages afterwards and won't come near me even if I'm
offering heavy duty kitty treats! Of course, each sessin is worse
because she knows what's about to happen.

I have 4 more days of this to look forward to! I'm estiamting that by
day 3 I will need antibiotics as well - but for my fingers, not my
itchy eyes! And my doctor told me off today about my high blood
pressure and racing pulse - I bet he's never had to wrestle an angry
cat (you know they can turn 180 degrees *inside* their fur and you
somehow end up looking at their tail and not their eyes?) and try to
persuade it that the nasty eye drops will make it feel better!

Anyhow, I'd better mop the blood off the keyboard and see if Cindy has
finally forgiven me. I cuddled her and she purred, but it was her
"angry sulky purr", a sort of "I'm only purring under duress" purr. In
anticipation, when I went grocery shopping today, I bought every type
of favourite food and kitty treat that the supermarket stocked. It
looks like I'm going to need them!

Tom S
March 31st 05, 01:19 AM
On 30 Mar 2005 11:21:51 -0800, wrote:

<snip>

>
>Anyhow, I'd better mop the blood off the keyboard and see if Cindy has
>finally forgiven me. I cuddled her and she purred, but it was her
>"angry sulky purr", a sort of "I'm only purring under duress" purr. In
>anticipation, when I went grocery shopping today, I bought every type
>of favourite food and kitty treat that the supermarket stocked. It
>looks like I'm going to need them!

I have the little story someone wrote about how to give a cat a pill,
but I am not sure where it is stored right now.

In the meantime, you might want to try wrapping them in a towel -tight
as a papose( ?sp) with only their head sticking out. That has worked
pretty well with the cats I have had to give medicine to. At least it
worked for pills and liquid meds from a syringe. Furface actually
likes his iron suppliment though. I gave it to him with an eye dropper
and he would try to suck it dry.

Tom

Sparks
March 31st 05, 02:16 AM
> I have the little story someone wrote about how to give a cat a pill,
> but I am not sure where it is stored right now.

This one?

1. Pick up the cat and cradle it in the crook of your left arm
as if holding a baby. Position right forefinger and thumb on either
side of cat's mouth and gently apply pressure to cheeks while
holding pill in right hand. As cat opens mouth, pop pill into mouth.
Allow cat to close mouth and swallow.

2. Retrieve pill from floor and cat from under chair. Cradle cat
in left arm and repeat process.

3. Retrieve cat from bedroom and throw soggy pill away.

4. Take a new pill from foil wrap. Cradle cat in left arm holding
rear paws tightly with left hand. Force jaws open and push pill
to back of mouth with right forefinger. Hold mouth shut for a count of ten.

5. Retrieve pill from goldfish bowl and cat from top
of wardrobe. Call spouse in from garden.

6. Kneel on floor with cat wedged firmly between the knees. Holding
front and rear paws, ignore low growls emitted by cat. Get spouse
to hold cat's head firmly with one hand while forcing wooden ruler
into mouth. Drop pill down ruler and rub cat's throat vigorously.

7. Retrieve cat from curtain rail, get another pill from foil wrap.
Make a note to buy a new ruler and repair curtains. Carefully
sweep shattered figurines from hearth and set aside for gluing later.

8. Wrap cat in large towel and get spouse to lie on cat with it's head
just visible from beneath spouse's armpit. Put pill in end of drinking
straw, force cat's mouth open with pencil and blow down straw.

9. Check label to make sure that pill is not harmful to humans. Drink
glass of water to take taste away. Apply band-aid to spouse's forearm
and remove blood from carpet with cold water and soap.

10.Retrieve cat from neighbor's shed. Get another pill. Place cat in
cupboard and close door onto neck to leave head showing. Force
mouth open with spoon, flick pill down throat with elastic band.

11. Fetch screwdriver from garage and put door back on hinges. Apply
cold compress to cheek and check records for last tetanus shot.
throw t-shirt away and fetch new one from bedroom.

12. Call the fire department to retrieve cat from tree across the road.
Apologize to neighbor who crashed into fence while swerving to avoid
cat. Take last pill from foil wrap.

13. Tie cat's front paws to rear paws with garden twine and bind tightly
to leg of dining room table. Find heavy duty pruning gloves from garage.
Force cat's mouth open with small trowel. Push pill into mouth followed}
by large piece of fillet steak. Hold head vertically and pour 1/2 pint
of water down throat to wash pill down.

14. Get spouse to drive you to emergency room. Sit quietly
while doctor stitches finger and forearm and removes pill remnants
from right eye. Stop by furniture store on the way home to order
a new table.

15. Arrange for vet to make housecall

Tee411
March 31st 05, 08:58 AM
What's worse than pilling a cat? Cathaterizing the cat everyday for 2 1/2
months to remove urine from its bladder. Kitty is fine now.


> wrote in message
oups.com...
> Current 3 out of 4 of us have conjunctivitis - that's me, Thenie and
> Cindy (Motley the tortie terror is fine, but will probably end up with
> gummy eyes). Dr Vet has kindly prescribed 2 sets of drops -
> antibiotics (5 days) and anti-inflammatory (2 days) both 3 times daily.
> Now I thought that pilling a cat could be difficult, but at least you
> can appeal to a cat's greed and hide a pill in something yummy.
> Eyedrops are much, much worse, especially when you're a single
> kitty-mother and you have to manage the restraint part as well as
> aiming the drop at the right place.
>
> So far I've done 2 doses per cat and my hands tell the story of each
> dose. Thenie the 6 year old was okay. For a "hunting, shooting and
> fishing" country cat that regularly brings home mice and pigeons (but
> never saves any pigeon for the rest of us) she is very mellow about
> having drops put in. She grumps about it, but soon forgives and just
> wants a cuddle.
>
> Cindy the 14 year old has already remodelled several of my fingers. Dr
> Vet removed most of her teeth 6 years ago (chronic gingivitis), but
> thoughtfully left an upper and lower fang that meet. And they meet
> through flesh as well, or at least through the web between thumb and
> forefinger. Her claws are like little razors. Worse, I feel so guilty
> as she sulks for ages afterwards and won't come near me even if I'm
> offering heavy duty kitty treats! Of course, each sessin is worse
> because she knows what's about to happen.
>
> I have 4 more days of this to look forward to! I'm estiamting that by
> day 3 I will need antibiotics as well - but for my fingers, not my
> itchy eyes! And my doctor told me off today about my high blood
> pressure and racing pulse - I bet he's never had to wrestle an angry
> cat (you know they can turn 180 degrees *inside* their fur and you
> somehow end up looking at their tail and not their eyes?) and try to
> persuade it that the nasty eye drops will make it feel better!
>
> Anyhow, I'd better mop the blood off the keyboard and see if Cindy has
> finally forgiven me. I cuddled her and she purred, but it was her
> "angry sulky purr", a sort of "I'm only purring under duress" purr. In
> anticipation, when I went grocery shopping today, I bought every type
> of favourite food and kitty treat that the supermarket stocked. It
> looks like I'm going to need them!
>

March 31st 05, 11:06 AM
Sparks wrote:
> > I have the little story someone wrote about how to give a cat a
pill,
> > but I am not sure where it is stored right now.
>
>
> 15. Arrange for vet to make housecall


One of my previous cats, Holly, would not take pills and bit my finger
to the bone when I tried to pill her. The vet (a locum, not the usual
vet) accused me of being a wimp. She said a few bad things about
rescue cats being tatty and unhealthy and I complained to the practice
manager, that locum has never been there again. I challenged the vet
to give Holly a pill. Holly clawed her way out of towel wraps and
eventually the vet gave her an antibiotic jab. Holly had weak hind
legs, but to compensate, she had unusually powerful front legs and
shoulders.

Cindy forgave me after several hours and lots of bribes. This morning
was much less of a struggle and she forgave me straight away and
*begged* for the rewards!

Ivor Jones
March 31st 05, 04:42 PM
wrote:
> Sparks wrote:
>>> I have the little story someone wrote about how to give a cat a
>>> pill, but I am not sure where it is stored right now.
>>
>>
>> 15. Arrange for vet to make housecall
>
>
> One of my previous cats, Holly, would not take pills and bit my
> finger to the bone when I tried to pill her. The vet (a locum, not
> the usual vet) accused me of being a wimp. She said a few bad
> things about rescue cats being tatty and unhealthy and I complained
> to the practice manager, that locum has never been there again. I
> challenged the vet to give Holly a pill. Holly clawed her way out
> of towel wraps and eventually the vet gave her an antibiotic jab.
> Holly had weak hind legs, but to compensate, she had unusually
> powerful front legs and shoulders.
>
> Cindy forgave me after several hours and lots of bribes. This
> morning was much less of a struggle and she forgave me straight
> away and *begged* for the rewards!

My Missy won't take pills at *any* price..! When I first had her from the
shelter, I tried to give her a worming pill. After wasting several, I
decided to call the vet, she said bring her round to the surgery. When we
got there, she tried with similar results..! Eventually, with three of us
(me, the nurse and the receptionist..!) holding her down, we finally got
the pill down..! Boy was she *angry* for ages afterwards ;-)

Now we've given up on tablets, if she needs worming we use Droncit, which
is a spot on liquid which acts on tapeworm, and Stronghold, which does
fleas and roundworm etc. If she needs antibiotics, it's round to the vet
for injections, strangely enough she doesn't seem to mind those..!

Ivor

the wharf rat
April 1st 05, 12:35 AM
We used to crush the pills up with the back of a spoon and
mix them with canned sweetened condensed milk. The cats would lick them
right up.

Linda Terrell
April 1st 05, 07:38 PM
Have you tried wearing leather gardening gloves?

LT


In article . com>,
wrote:

Sarah Hotdesking
April 1st 05, 08:13 PM
"Linda Terrell" > wrote in message
...
> Have you tried wearing leather gardening gloves?
>
Leather gardening gloves are great for holding onto a cat, but it's
impossible to manipulate a tiny, fiddly bottle of eyedrops into a squinty
blinking eye when wearing them! I've found that my cats love a play session
with long feathers and I use that as a reward after doing the drops. It
seems to get them over the sulky bit and is reducing their resistance to
being medicated because they associate it with having fun straight
afterwards. It works out a better bribe than cat treats and a lot more
healthy for all of us!

I use welder's gauntlets when handling young feral cats. With the real
tinies, I don't want to risk hurting them (always a danger when wearing
anything that makes your hands less sensitive) so I just grit my teeth and
accept that I will bleed and I will heal. Luckily kitten claws and teeth do
much less damage than those of half-grown ferals (at least kitten
teeth/claws don't go as deep). I make chain mail (armour) and I'm sometimes
tempted to reinforce the backs and arms of my gauntlets with sections of
chain!
--
Sarah H
Messybeast: http://www.messybeast.com
Dragonqueen:
http://www.shartwell.freeserve.co.uk/humor-site/medical-acronyms.htm
Doctors' acronyms decoded