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Preston Crawford
July 15th 05, 03:03 PM
This has been like a 2 year oddessy. We have a very loving, adorable
black cat. Likes to be a lap cat. Takes very good care of his sister (we
adopted litter-mates) and is overall a great cat. There's one problem.
He's REALLY needy at night and he's made our nights hell for the last
two years.

From the start we've had a closed-door policy. Mostly because one of our
first cats would jump on us at 3am and given that my wife and I both
have insomnia that won't work. No problem with that cat. Door closed, he
goes and finds something else to do. Opus, however, begin incessantly
scratching on the door and waking us up. So we searched around places
like this and our first attempt at getting our nights back was to open
the door and let him in. The other cat had grown up enough that he was
happy to be at the foot of the bed or in the closet. So we thought we
had a solution. Opus, however, insisted on biting our fingers to play
and in my case (since I use a CPAP for apnea that blows out air) batting
at my head and scratching. So we sought help again. Someone said get a
squirt bottle. After like 3 weeks of squirting him and him not getting
the hint we closed the door again and tried the vacuum cleaner trick.

Well, that worked for all of 2 weeks until one day I found out from my
wife that she was waking up up to 5 times a night to plug the vacuum in.
Then someone at a pet store told us that baby gates were the way to go.
They can't be scratched and they're a barrier. So we bought two and
tried that. Now we're in an arms race with Opus. We put up a baby gate,
he jumps it. We put up two staggered, he jumps between them like an
acrobat. We STACK them going almost all the way to the ceiling and he
jumps on the bannister instead. We put a large laundry basket on the
bannister and he jumps into the laudry basket and slides onto the floor.
Last night my wife woke up twice because now, in spite of putting a towl
over the top of the baby gates, lest he scale them, he managed to jump
over the 6 feet worth of baby gates.

In other words the situation has gone from ridiculous to he's getting
locked in a closet soon. I don't want to lock him in a closet at night.
I don't want to give him away. But this is getting ridiculous. He's been
disturbing our already poor sleep for 2 years now. And he won't quit.
We've tried virtually everything you're supposed to try. We didn't even
list half of the things, like the "no scratch" spray on the door, stuff
like that. We don't know what to do. We're at a point now where we have
to barricade ourselves in our own bedroom with 6 feet of baby gates, a
towel draped over it and a giant hamper guarding the flank with the
bannister and he's still finding a way over. I have to give him credit
for tenacity, but it's getting really really really really really old.
We just want decent sleep. We already have sleep problems without Opus
making it worse. And at this point it's gone from a nuisance to "please
tell us, Opus, why we shouldn't find a new home for you?"

Please help give any advice possible. We don't want to give up on him,
but we need sleep.

Preston

BC
July 15th 05, 05:16 PM
Preston Crawford wrote:
> This has been like a 2 year oddessy. We have a very loving, adorable
> black cat. Likes to be a lap cat. Takes very good care of his sister (we
> adopted litter-mates) and is overall a great cat. There's one problem.
> He's REALLY needy at night and he's made our nights hell for the last
> two years.
>
> From the start we've had a closed-door policy. Mostly because one of our
> first cats would jump on us at 3am and given that my wife and I both
> have insomnia that won't work. No problem with that cat. Door closed, he
> goes and finds something else to do. Opus, however, begin incessantly
> scratching on the door and waking us up. So we searched around places
> like this and our first attempt at getting our nights back was to open
> the door and let him in. The other cat had grown up enough that he was
> happy to be at the foot of the bed or in the closet. So we thought we
> had a solution. Opus, however, insisted on biting our fingers to play
> and in my case (since I use a CPAP for apnea that blows out air) batting
> at my head and scratching. So we sought help again. Someone said get a
> squirt bottle. After like 3 weeks of squirting him and him not getting
> the hint we closed the door again and tried the vacuum cleaner trick.
>
> Well, that worked for all of 2 weeks until one day I found out from my
> wife that she was waking up up to 5 times a night to plug the vacuum in.
> Then someone at a pet store told us that baby gates were the way to go.
> They can't be scratched and they're a barrier. So we bought two and
> tried that. Now we're in an arms race with Opus. We put up a baby gate,
> he jumps it. We put up two staggered, he jumps between them like an
> acrobat. We STACK them going almost all the way to the ceiling and he
> jumps on the bannister instead. We put a large laundry basket on the
> bannister and he jumps into the laudry basket and slides onto the floor.
> Last night my wife woke up twice because now, in spite of putting a towl
> over the top of the baby gates, lest he scale them, he managed to jump
> over the 6 feet worth of baby gates.
>
> In other words the situation has gone from ridiculous to he's getting
> locked in a closet soon. I don't want to lock him in a closet at night.
> I don't want to give him away. But this is getting ridiculous. He's been
> disturbing our already poor sleep for 2 years now. And he won't quit.
> We've tried virtually everything you're supposed to try. We didn't even
> list half of the things, like the "no scratch" spray on the door, stuff
> like that. We don't know what to do. We're at a point now where we have
> to barricade ourselves in our own bedroom with 6 feet of baby gates, a
> towel draped over it and a giant hamper guarding the flank with the
> bannister and he's still finding a way over. I have to give him credit
> for tenacity, but it's getting really really really really really old.
> We just want decent sleep. We already have sleep problems without Opus
> making it worse. And at this point it's gone from a nuisance to "please
> tell us, Opus, why we shouldn't find a new home for you?"
>
> Please help give any advice possible. We don't want to give up on him,
> but we need sleep.
>
> Preston
>
Do you have another room you can lock him in? One further from your
bedroom? A kitchen perhaps? Does he always have access to food? Maybe
a radio left on would soothe him or cover up the noises for you! Has he
always been like this or just more recently?

--
Badger Badger Badger

jils
July 16th 05, 03:26 AM
exactly what i was going to say.
hi, i'm new here, but a cat lover from way back.

isn't there another bedroom, or a bathroom, far enough from your own
bedroom, that you can enclose this cat in?
supply a litter tray, some bedding, water, etc. and lock him in there.

i'd go mad without sleep.

from a different perspective, why is this cat so lively at night?
is he not stimulated enough during the day? is there a way to tire him more?
most cats seem happy to sleep about 18 hours a day!
if you see him sleeping during the day, wake him up to play!


BC wrote:

>>
> Do you have another room you can lock him in? One further from your
> bedroom? A kitchen perhaps? Does he always have access to food? Maybe
> a radio left on would soothe him or cover up the noises for you! Has he
> always been like this or just more recently?
>

Preston Crawford
July 16th 05, 03:23 PM
On 2005-07-15, BC > wrote:
>> Please help give any advice possible. We don't want to give up on him,
>> but we need sleep.
>>
>> Preston
>>
> Do you have another room you can lock him in? One further from your
> bedroom? A kitchen perhaps? Does he always have access to food? Maybe
> a radio left on would soothe him or cover up the noises for you! Has he
> always been like this or just more recently?

He's always been like this. He's just a real people-cat. He follows us
around a lot. He lays on our chests or laps while we watch TV. His
sister (who isn't as bad) hangs out with me when I'm on the computer.
She's beside me right now. So it's just *in* them, to be really need for
people. Which is sorta cute if you're awake, not if you're asleep.

Preston

Preston Crawford
July 16th 05, 03:28 PM
On 2005-07-16, jils > wrote:
> exactly what i was going to say.
> hi, i'm new here, but a cat lover from way back.
>
> isn't there another bedroom, or a bathroom, far enough from your own
> bedroom, that you can enclose this cat in?
> supply a litter tray, some bedding, water, etc. and lock him in there.

Not really. We have a two bedroom apartment. My fear is if we lock him
in the only other bedroom (which happens to be right next to our bedroom
and contains the litter box) that...

#1 - We'd have to move the litter box
#2 - We'd have to lock ALL the cats in that room.

So the best case scenario would be that we lock one or all the cats in
said room and that they don't scratch on the wall or mew loudly or
something.

> i'd go mad without sleep.

I think we are going mad without sleep. We already both have insomnia.
Which may be why we've put up with it for so long. But now we're getting
that a little under control, so this is a real buzz kill.

> from a different perspective, why is this cat so lively at night?

He's like this all the time. Not lively so much as he just wants to be
in our precense whenever we're around. I don't know why. When we adopted
him, that's what the sheet said about his personality. "He'll hang out
and watch you do dishes", stuff like that. We just didn't realize how
far that went.

> is he not stimulated enough during the day? is there a way to tire him more?
> most cats seem happy to sleep about 18 hours a day!
> if you see him sleeping during the day, wake him up to play!
>
>
> BC wrote:
>
>>>
>> Do you have another room you can lock him in? One further from your
>> bedroom? A kitchen perhaps? Does he always have access to food? Maybe
>> a radio left on would soothe him or cover up the noises for you! Has he
>> always been like this or just more recently?

Yeah, I don't see it. We both work, so we'd have to be playing with him
every waking our of our off time. Which isn't much. It's not an energy
thing. It's a determination to be with his people thing.

Preston

jils
July 16th 05, 10:41 PM
you can't shut him in the bathroom?
you can't buy another litter tray?

when you're at work, is he indoors? if so, he surely sleeps all that time.
indoors in an apartment would be pretty boring!
get some of those toys that you can put kibble inside, that would give
him more to do, work for his food.

does he have a climbing/scratching pole for exercise & entertainment?

it seems a shame to make him stay away, when he's so loyal and needs you
so much.

Preston Crawford wrote:
>
> Not really. We have a two bedroom apartment. My fear is if we lock him
> in the only other bedroom (which happens to be right next to our bedroom
> and contains the litter box) that...
>
> #1 - We'd have to move the litter box
> #2 - We'd have to lock ALL the cats in that room.
>
> Yeah, I don't see it. We both work, so we'd have to be playing with him
> every waking our of our off time. Which isn't much. It's not an energy
> thing. It's a determination to be with his people thing.
>
> Preston

Preston Crawford
July 17th 05, 12:27 AM
On 2005-07-16, jils > wrote:
> you can't shut him in the bathroom?
> you can't buy another litter tray?

We can do both of those things, but we're in a two bedroom apartment.
There's only so much space for all the cat houses, litter boxen, etc. We
live pretty spartan as it is. Setting up yet another cat domicile would
not make this easier.

> when you're at work, is he indoors? if so, he surely sleeps all that time.
> indoors in an apartment would be pretty boring!
> get some of those toys that you can put kibble inside, that would give
> him more to do, work for his food.

He has plenty of toys. And he's indoors because we live in the city and
that's what the shelter people wanted. They don't like having to
re-adopt out lost kitties.

> does he have a climbing/scratching pole for exercise & entertainment?

Yes.

> it seems a shame to make him stay away, when he's so loyal and needs you
> so much.

Well, he is loyal and we love him. But if we don't sleep, he doesn't eat
(nor do we). I mean, we have to sleep, when did that become optional
because you have a pet?

Preston

jils
July 17th 05, 12:29 AM
as a last resort, have you considered asking a vet for sleeping pills?
if you could break the cycle, say for a couple of weeks, his behaviour
might change.
and you'd be rested and more able to cope!

Preston Crawford wrote:

> Well, he is loyal and we love him. But if we don't sleep, he doesn't eat
> (nor do we). I mean, we have to sleep, when did that become optional
> because you have a pet?
>
> Preston

Jenna F via CatKB.com
July 17th 05, 03:14 AM
There is a simple answer to your problem. If you live in a two-story house,
then you can keep your cat on the opposite floor and keep in a different room
with the door closed. Keep food, water, and a litterpan in the room and this
should end your problems. I hope that I've helped you and please let me know
if it all works out.

Preston Crawford wrote:
>This has been like a 2 year oddessy. We have a very loving, adorable
>black cat. Likes to be a lap cat. Takes very good care of his sister (we
>adopted litter-mates) and is overall a great cat. There's one problem.
>He's REALLY needy at night and he's made our nights hell for the last
>two years.
>
>From the start we've had a closed-door policy. Mostly because one of our
>first cats would jump on us at 3am and given that my wife and I both
>have insomnia that won't work. No problem with that cat. Door closed, he
>goes and finds something else to do. Opus, however, begin incessantly
>scratching on the door and waking us up. So we searched around places
>like this and our first attempt at getting our nights back was to open
>the door and let him in. The other cat had grown up enough that he was
>happy to be at the foot of the bed or in the closet. So we thought we
>had a solution. Opus, however, insisted on biting our fingers to play
>and in my case (since I use a CPAP for apnea that blows out air) batting
>at my head and scratching. So we sought help again. Someone said get a
>squirt bottle. After like 3 weeks of squirting him and him not getting
>the hint we closed the door again and tried the vacuum cleaner trick.
>
>Well, that worked for all of 2 weeks until one day I found out from my
>wife that she was waking up up to 5 times a night to plug the vacuum in.
>Then someone at a pet store told us that baby gates were the way to go.
>They can't be scratched and they're a barrier. So we bought two and
>tried that. Now we're in an arms race with Opus. We put up a baby gate,
>he jumps it. We put up two staggered, he jumps between them like an
>acrobat. We STACK them going almost all the way to the ceiling and he
>jumps on the bannister instead. We put a large laundry basket on the
>bannister and he jumps into the laudry basket and slides onto the floor.
>Last night my wife woke up twice because now, in spite of putting a towl
>over the top of the baby gates, lest he scale them, he managed to jump
>over the 6 feet worth of baby gates.
>
>In other words the situation has gone from ridiculous to he's getting
>locked in a closet soon. I don't want to lock him in a closet at night.
>I don't want to give him away. But this is getting ridiculous. He's been
>disturbing our already poor sleep for 2 years now. And he won't quit.
>We've tried virtually everything you're supposed to try. We didn't even
>list half of the things, like the "no scratch" spray on the door, stuff
>like that. We don't know what to do. We're at a point now where we have
>to barricade ourselves in our own bedroom with 6 feet of baby gates, a
>towel draped over it and a giant hamper guarding the flank with the
>bannister and he's still finding a way over. I have to give him credit
>for tenacity, but it's getting really really really really really old.
>We just want decent sleep. We already have sleep problems without Opus
>making it worse. And at this point it's gone from a nuisance to "please
>tell us, Opus, why we shouldn't find a new home for you?"
>
>Please help give any advice possible. We don't want to give up on him,
>but we need sleep.
>
>Preston

--
"There is no snooze button on a hungry cat." Anonymous

Visit thelifeofcats.blogspot.com
Visit periodcornerjustforgirls.blogspot.com

Neither blog has a www.

July 17th 05, 05:08 PM
On Fri, 15 Jul 2005 09:03:44 -0500, Preston Crawford
> wrote:

>This has been like a 2 year oddessy. We have a very loving, adorable
>black cat. Likes to be a lap cat. Takes very good care of his sister (we
>adopted litter-mates) and is overall a great cat. There's one problem.
>He's REALLY needy at night and he's made our nights hell for the last
>two years.

Is it food he wants? Mine wakes up every morning with the sound of
the birds outside and wants to be fed. He will make as much noise as
possible until I wake up and feed him, including running over my legs
and knocking stuff off my night stand. As soon as I feed him, though,
he and I can both go back to sleep. I've thought about buying an auto
feeder for him so he won't feel the need to rely on me for food in the
morning. He has endless kibble, it's the canned breakfast he wants.
Habits are hard to break.

pepsi

Jen M. via CatKB.com
July 17th 05, 08:56 PM
This might be a couple of silly suggestions--but....I read somewhere that
cats don't like citrus--wonder if you could try that? Also, my cat George is
quite persistent in attentions--headbutting--nipping my feet, etc.--One day
he had a little fluff ball on his cheek and I blew it off--he didn't like
this at all. I figured out when I am trying to sleep and he comes for
attentions--I gently blow in his face--he will settle down about two feet
from me.

I wish you the best!

Sincerely,
Jen

Preston Crawford wrote:
>This has been like a 2 year oddessy. We have a very loving, adorable
>black cat. Likes to be a lap cat. Takes very good care of his sister (we
>adopted litter-mates) and is overall a great cat. There's one problem.
>He's REALLY needy at night and he's made our nights hell for the last
>two years.
>
>From the start we've had a closed-door policy. Mostly because one of our
>first cats would jump on us at 3am and given that my wife and I both
>have insomnia that won't work. No problem with that cat. Door closed, he
>goes and finds something else to do. Opus, however, begin incessantly
>scratching on the door and waking us up. So we searched around places
>like this and our first attempt at getting our nights back was to open
>the door and let him in. The other cat had grown up enough that he was
>happy to be at the foot of the bed or in the closet. So we thought we
>had a solution. Opus, however, insisted on biting our fingers to play
>and in my case (since I use a CPAP for apnea that blows out air) batting
>at my head and scratching. So we sought help again. Someone said get a
>squirt bottle. After like 3 weeks of squirting him and him not getting
>the hint we closed the door again and tried the vacuum cleaner trick.
>
>Well, that worked for all of 2 weeks until one day I found out from my
>wife that she was waking up up to 5 times a night to plug the vacuum in.
>Then someone at a pet store told us that baby gates were the way to go.
>They can't be scratched and they're a barrier. So we bought two and
>tried that. Now we're in an arms race with Opus. We put up a baby gate,
>he jumps it. We put up two staggered, he jumps between them like an
>acrobat. We STACK them going almost all the way to the ceiling and he
>jumps on the bannister instead. We put a large laundry basket on the
>bannister and he jumps into the laudry basket and slides onto the floor.
>Last night my wife woke up twice because now, in spite of putting a towl
>over the top of the baby gates, lest he scale them, he managed to jump
>over the 6 feet worth of baby gates.
>
>In other words the situation has gone from ridiculous to he's getting
>locked in a closet soon. I don't want to lock him in a closet at night.
>I don't want to give him away. But this is getting ridiculous. He's been
>disturbing our already poor sleep for 2 years now. And he won't quit.
>We've tried virtually everything you're supposed to try. We didn't even
>list half of the things, like the "no scratch" spray on the door, stuff
>like that. We don't know what to do. We're at a point now where we have
>to barricade ourselves in our own bedroom with 6 feet of baby gates, a
>towel draped over it and a giant hamper guarding the flank with the
>bannister and he's still finding a way over. I have to give him credit
>for tenacity, but it's getting really really really really really old.
>We just want decent sleep. We already have sleep problems without Opus
>making it worse. And at this point it's gone from a nuisance to "please
>tell us, Opus, why we shouldn't find a new home for you?"
>
>Please help give any advice possible. We don't want to give up on him,
>but we need sleep.
>
>Preston


--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

jils
July 18th 05, 08:50 AM
hey preston
i was listening to an animal behavourist on the radio today, talk back
stuff, people ringing with pet problems. i thought of you and your cat.
anyway, no one rang with the same problem as yours, but many of her
solutions for difficult behaviour were based on a vet consultation for
drug therapy. she advocated drugs in conjunction with behaviour
modification for the really hard cases.
i'd hate to think of you losing your cat, he sounds rather nice in most
ways. and his sister might suffer as a result.
do let us know how you're getting on.


Preston Crawford wrote:
> This has been like a 2 year oddessy. We have a very loving, adorable
> black cat. Likes to be a lap cat. Takes very good care of his sister (we
> adopted litter-mates) and is overall a great cat. There's one problem.
> He's REALLY needy at night and he's made our nights hell for the last
> two years.
>
> From the start we've had a closed-door policy. Mostly because one of our
> first cats would jump on us at 3am and given that my wife and I both
> have insomnia that won't work. No problem with that cat. Door closed, he
> goes and finds something else to do. Opus, however, begin incessantly
> scratching on the door and waking us up. So we searched around places
> like this and our first attempt at getting our nights back was to open
> the door and let him in. The other cat had grown up enough that he was
> happy to be at the foot of the bed or in the closet. So we thought we
> had a solution. Opus, however, insisted on biting our fingers to play
> and in my case (since I use a CPAP for apnea that blows out air) batting
> at my head and scratching. So we sought help again. Someone said get a
> squirt bottle. After like 3 weeks of squirting him and him not getting
> the hint we closed the door again and tried the vacuum cleaner trick.
>
> Well, that worked for all of 2 weeks until one day I found out from my
> wife that she was waking up up to 5 times a night to plug the vacuum in.
> Then someone at a pet store told us that baby gates were the way to go.
> They can't be scratched and they're a barrier. So we bought two and
> tried that. Now we're in an arms race with Opus. We put up a baby gate,
> he jumps it. We put up two staggered, he jumps between them like an
> acrobat. We STACK them going almost all the way to the ceiling and he
> jumps on the bannister instead. We put a large laundry basket on the
> bannister and he jumps into the laudry basket and slides onto the floor.
> Last night my wife woke up twice because now, in spite of putting a towl
> over the top of the baby gates, lest he scale them, he managed to jump
> over the 6 feet worth of baby gates.
>
> In other words the situation has gone from ridiculous to he's getting
> locked in a closet soon. I don't want to lock him in a closet at night.
> I don't want to give him away. But this is getting ridiculous. He's been
> disturbing our already poor sleep for 2 years now. And he won't quit.
> We've tried virtually everything you're supposed to try. We didn't even
> list half of the things, like the "no scratch" spray on the door, stuff
> like that. We don't know what to do. We're at a point now where we have
> to barricade ourselves in our own bedroom with 6 feet of baby gates, a
> towel draped over it and a giant hamper guarding the flank with the
> bannister and he's still finding a way over. I have to give him credit
> for tenacity, but it's getting really really really really really old.
> We just want decent sleep. We already have sleep problems without Opus
> making it worse. And at this point it's gone from a nuisance to "please
> tell us, Opus, why we shouldn't find a new home for you?"
>
> Please help give any advice possible. We don't want to give up on him,
> but we need sleep.
>
> Preston
>

Karen M.
July 18th 05, 10:32 PM
Preston wrote:
> This has been like a 2 year oddessy. We have a very loving, adorable
> black cat. Likes to be a lap cat. Takes very good care of his sister (we
> adopted litter-mates) and is overall a great cat. There's one problem.
> He's REALLY needy at night and he's made our nights hell for the last
> two years.
[horror story snipped]

My idea is to wear him out. When you two are at work, falling asleep at
your desks, he's happily snoozing up for that evening's antics.

So, when you get up, play with him vigorously for a while. Make him
run! Jump! Laser pointer! Catnip!

Leave several radios on timers so there's a fairly constant supply of
changing noise.

Look into a solar-powered cat toy. "Rainbow maker" is what I have.

When you get home, more fun time. Have him do laps around the living
soom. He should be panting before you quit. But wind things down about
an hour before you want to retire.

When you do, shut him up in the spare bedroom or the bathroom or the
kitchen. Litter box, kibbles, water, fleece blankie, and sister.

You might also want to look into a white noise (babbling brook? peeping
frogs?) machine besides the CPAP.

Human infants need to be rescheduled in a similar fashion. I'm sure
many parents would like a three-month return clause.

HTH

--Karen M.
who trained my kids that we don't eat until daylight

Nick
July 21st 05, 09:23 PM
Hi Preston, I really admire your loyalty to Opus. There are so many cats we
get at the SPCA who would love to have a loyal, loving "owner" like
yourself. but that's another story.

as for opus, i would try placing a scat mat: http://www.scatmat.com/home.asp
in front of your door. I have three very affectionate cats, and they love
to jump on you and paw you when you sleep.. and they take turns doing it...
when one gets tired, another jumps on. so i have a closed door policy, which
they don't appreciate. they'd try to claw the door, or reach under the door
adn pull at it so it'd go bang! bang! bang!. So i finally got one of these
scat mats and place it in front of my door, and it worked pretty well. They
basically touch it once, get a light, uncomfortable shock, and don't touch
it anymore. Until one of my cats, the smartest cat i've ever met, figured
out how it worked... but that's another story.

it's expensive (~50 bucks). but you are welcome to borrow mine for a couple
nights if you'd like, to see if it works.

good luck
nick




"Preston Crawford" > wrote in message
...
> This has been like a 2 year oddessy. We have a very loving, adorable
> black cat. Likes to be a lap cat. Takes very good care of his sister (we
> adopted litter-mates) and is overall a great cat. There's one problem.
> He's REALLY needy at night and he's made our nights hell for the last
> two years.
>
> From the start we've had a closed-door policy. Mostly because one of our
> first cats would jump on us at 3am and given that my wife and I both
> have insomnia that won't work. No problem with that cat. Door closed, he
> goes and finds something else to do. Opus, however, begin incessantly
> scratching on the door and waking us up. So we searched around places
> like this and our first attempt at getting our nights back was to open
> the door and let him in. The other cat had grown up enough that he was
> happy to be at the foot of the bed or in the closet. So we thought we
> had a solution. Opus, however, insisted on biting our fingers to play
> and in my case (since I use a CPAP for apnea that blows out air) batting
> at my head and scratching. So we sought help again. Someone said get a
> squirt bottle. After like 3 weeks of squirting him and him not getting
> the hint we closed the door again and tried the vacuum cleaner trick.
>
> Well, that worked for all of 2 weeks until one day I found out from my
> wife that she was waking up up to 5 times a night to plug the vacuum in.
> Then someone at a pet store told us that baby gates were the way to go.
> They can't be scratched and they're a barrier. So we bought two and
> tried that. Now we're in an arms race with Opus. We put up a baby gate,
> he jumps it. We put up two staggered, he jumps between them like an
> acrobat. We STACK them going almost all the way to the ceiling and he
> jumps on the bannister instead. We put a large laundry basket on the
> bannister and he jumps into the laudry basket and slides onto the floor.
> Last night my wife woke up twice because now, in spite of putting a towl
> over the top of the baby gates, lest he scale them, he managed to jump
> over the 6 feet worth of baby gates.
>
> In other words the situation has gone from ridiculous to he's getting
> locked in a closet soon. I don't want to lock him in a closet at night.
> I don't want to give him away. But this is getting ridiculous. He's been
> disturbing our already poor sleep for 2 years now. And he won't quit.
> We've tried virtually everything you're supposed to try. We didn't even
> list half of the things, like the "no scratch" spray on the door, stuff
> like that. We don't know what to do. We're at a point now where we have
> to barricade ourselves in our own bedroom with 6 feet of baby gates, a
> towel draped over it and a giant hamper guarding the flank with the
> bannister and he's still finding a way over. I have to give him credit
> for tenacity, but it's getting really really really really really old.
> We just want decent sleep. We already have sleep problems without Opus
> making it worse. And at this point it's gone from a nuisance to "please
> tell us, Opus, why we shouldn't find a new home for you?"
>
> Please help give any advice possible. We don't want to give up on him,
> but we need sleep.
>
> Preston
>

jils
July 21st 05, 11:19 PM
oh wait right there. i want to hear it!!

Nick wrote:
Until one of my cats, the smartest cat i've ever met, figured
> out how it worked... but that's another story.