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Cathi
August 15th 04, 06:27 AM
Those of you who were posting here four years ago or so may remember
that Jasper, our handsome black DSH male, has a small bald patch on one
leg. He was involved in a fight; his leg was bitten, and one of the
many punctures became infected with an abcess as the result. Luckily
our fantastic vet was able to sort things out for him, and the bald spot
is all there is to show. No limping or movement problems.

Well, Jasper's been bitten again, on the same leg. This time we were
able to see the wound, and he's been to the vet to have it cleaned up
and bandaged. He's getting around with relative ease, and his
appetite hasn't been diminished!

One thing of concern though .... in the tests the vet did, it would
appear that Jazzie's glucose levels were high, indicating the
possibility of diabetes. He's about 7 years old BTW. It could be that
the levels were high owing to the stress of the fight/wound/etc but
...... we shall have to wait and see.

Anyone here with experience of diabetic cats - any advice you can offer?
It may be something that can be controlled with diet, according to our
vet; Jasper, whilst a solid cat, isn't fat, and is very active.

TIA


--
Cathi

JBHajos
August 15th 04, 12:06 PM
On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 06:27:17 +0100, Cathi
> wrote:

>Those of you who were posting here four years ago or so may remember
>that Jasper, our handsome black DSH male, has a small bald patch on one
>leg.

Yes, I've been with the Group for nearly seven years and remember
Jasper. Sorry to hear he's been hurt again.

>Anyone here with experience of diabetic cats - any advice you can offer?

Our Hobo's experience is almost identical to Jasper's. Last summer
he was attacked by a semi-feral tom who spent his time terrorizing the
neighborhood. Hobo's back leg was wounded and took forever and a day
to heal. Seemed no amount of antibiotics, ointments, even an
E-collar, helped at all. It kept re-infecting but finally healed
over. Then in January, we noticed that Hobo had difficulty with his
back legs crumpling under him as he walked. Back to the vet for an
X-ray to check for a possible hairline fracture from the bite. Long
story shorter, there was no break but the vet (a new one) suggested
testing for diabetes. Weakness in the back legs is one sign of it as
is the long healing process. It was, indeed, diabetes - a full-blown
case of it. His glucose level was sky-high. How I wish it had been
caught earlier - and I truly hope that Jasper is NOT diabetic or that
it's been found early enough that diet alone will help.

Hobo's case has been a roller-coaster ride. It's been difficult
getting him stabilized. He'd lost a lot of weight, "crashed" twice,
has frequent glucose-level checks, has insulin injections twice a day,
and has a special Purina DM (diabetes management) food (that is
available only from a vet). Even so, his glucose level continues to
rise and his insulin dosage increased. It's a rough battle.

I truly don't mean to scare you or sound pessimistic. Hobo just
suffered with it too long before the disease was discovered. Probably
Jasper was just stressed out and will be all right. I got good advice
from folks here in RPCA; Zuzu (Megan) was a tremendous help, too,
especially since I knew zilch about diabetes.

Anyway, that's been our experience. Best of luck to you and Jasper.
Keep us updated.

Jeanne

JBHajos
August 15th 04, 12:06 PM
On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 06:27:17 +0100, Cathi
> wrote:

>Those of you who were posting here four years ago or so may remember
>that Jasper, our handsome black DSH male, has a small bald patch on one
>leg.

Yes, I've been with the Group for nearly seven years and remember
Jasper. Sorry to hear he's been hurt again.

>Anyone here with experience of diabetic cats - any advice you can offer?

Our Hobo's experience is almost identical to Jasper's. Last summer
he was attacked by a semi-feral tom who spent his time terrorizing the
neighborhood. Hobo's back leg was wounded and took forever and a day
to heal. Seemed no amount of antibiotics, ointments, even an
E-collar, helped at all. It kept re-infecting but finally healed
over. Then in January, we noticed that Hobo had difficulty with his
back legs crumpling under him as he walked. Back to the vet for an
X-ray to check for a possible hairline fracture from the bite. Long
story shorter, there was no break but the vet (a new one) suggested
testing for diabetes. Weakness in the back legs is one sign of it as
is the long healing process. It was, indeed, diabetes - a full-blown
case of it. His glucose level was sky-high. How I wish it had been
caught earlier - and I truly hope that Jasper is NOT diabetic or that
it's been found early enough that diet alone will help.

Hobo's case has been a roller-coaster ride. It's been difficult
getting him stabilized. He'd lost a lot of weight, "crashed" twice,
has frequent glucose-level checks, has insulin injections twice a day,
and has a special Purina DM (diabetes management) food (that is
available only from a vet). Even so, his glucose level continues to
rise and his insulin dosage increased. It's a rough battle.

I truly don't mean to scare you or sound pessimistic. Hobo just
suffered with it too long before the disease was discovered. Probably
Jasper was just stressed out and will be all right. I got good advice
from folks here in RPCA; Zuzu (Megan) was a tremendous help, too,
especially since I knew zilch about diabetes.

Anyway, that's been our experience. Best of luck to you and Jasper.
Keep us updated.

Jeanne

JBHajos
August 15th 04, 12:06 PM
On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 06:27:17 +0100, Cathi
> wrote:

>Those of you who were posting here four years ago or so may remember
>that Jasper, our handsome black DSH male, has a small bald patch on one
>leg.

Yes, I've been with the Group for nearly seven years and remember
Jasper. Sorry to hear he's been hurt again.

>Anyone here with experience of diabetic cats - any advice you can offer?

Our Hobo's experience is almost identical to Jasper's. Last summer
he was attacked by a semi-feral tom who spent his time terrorizing the
neighborhood. Hobo's back leg was wounded and took forever and a day
to heal. Seemed no amount of antibiotics, ointments, even an
E-collar, helped at all. It kept re-infecting but finally healed
over. Then in January, we noticed that Hobo had difficulty with his
back legs crumpling under him as he walked. Back to the vet for an
X-ray to check for a possible hairline fracture from the bite. Long
story shorter, there was no break but the vet (a new one) suggested
testing for diabetes. Weakness in the back legs is one sign of it as
is the long healing process. It was, indeed, diabetes - a full-blown
case of it. His glucose level was sky-high. How I wish it had been
caught earlier - and I truly hope that Jasper is NOT diabetic or that
it's been found early enough that diet alone will help.

Hobo's case has been a roller-coaster ride. It's been difficult
getting him stabilized. He'd lost a lot of weight, "crashed" twice,
has frequent glucose-level checks, has insulin injections twice a day,
and has a special Purina DM (diabetes management) food (that is
available only from a vet). Even so, his glucose level continues to
rise and his insulin dosage increased. It's a rough battle.

I truly don't mean to scare you or sound pessimistic. Hobo just
suffered with it too long before the disease was discovered. Probably
Jasper was just stressed out and will be all right. I got good advice
from folks here in RPCA; Zuzu (Megan) was a tremendous help, too,
especially since I knew zilch about diabetes.

Anyway, that's been our experience. Best of luck to you and Jasper.
Keep us updated.

Jeanne

Cathi
August 15th 04, 12:56 PM
In message >, JBHajos
> writes

(snip Hobo story for compactness)
>
Thanks. No sign of weakness in the legs so far. And he seemed to like
his antibiotic tablet, which is a bonus - the vet commented that they
are made to be palatable. He certainly seems healthy enough other than
a fetching red bandage on the affected leg.

At least this time we caught his wound early. With the first one, the
first we noticed was him limping very badly. Trying to look at his foot
was impossible; he swore and scratched - not like him at all. This
time, although he's using the leg with care, he is at least using it.

Carrie thinks this is wonderful. She gets "out" time in the garden
without the risk of being attacked by a bouncy black cat!
--
Cathi

Cathi
August 15th 04, 12:56 PM
In message >, JBHajos
> writes

(snip Hobo story for compactness)
>
Thanks. No sign of weakness in the legs so far. And he seemed to like
his antibiotic tablet, which is a bonus - the vet commented that they
are made to be palatable. He certainly seems healthy enough other than
a fetching red bandage on the affected leg.

At least this time we caught his wound early. With the first one, the
first we noticed was him limping very badly. Trying to look at his foot
was impossible; he swore and scratched - not like him at all. This
time, although he's using the leg with care, he is at least using it.

Carrie thinks this is wonderful. She gets "out" time in the garden
without the risk of being attacked by a bouncy black cat!
--
Cathi

Cathi
August 15th 04, 12:56 PM
In message >, JBHajos
> writes

(snip Hobo story for compactness)
>
Thanks. No sign of weakness in the legs so far. And he seemed to like
his antibiotic tablet, which is a bonus - the vet commented that they
are made to be palatable. He certainly seems healthy enough other than
a fetching red bandage on the affected leg.

At least this time we caught his wound early. With the first one, the
first we noticed was him limping very badly. Trying to look at his foot
was impossible; he swore and scratched - not like him at all. This
time, although he's using the leg with care, he is at least using it.

Carrie thinks this is wonderful. She gets "out" time in the garden
without the risk of being attacked by a bouncy black cat!
--
Cathi

Marina
August 15th 04, 02:24 PM
"Cathi" > wrote

>
> One thing of concern though .... in the tests the vet did, it would
> appear that Jazzie's glucose levels were high, indicating the
> possibility of diabetes. He's about 7 years old BTW. It could be that
> the levels were high owing to the stress of the fight/wound/etc but
> ..... we shall have to wait and see.

I don't have experience with diabetes in cats, but do have 34 years of
experience with diabetes in me. ;o) We are sending lots of purrs that
Jasper's wound heals soon and that the high glucose was, indeed, due to the
trauma and not a sign of diabetes.

--
Marina, Frank and Nikki
Email marina (dot) kurten (at) pp (dot) inet (dot) fi
Pics at http://uk.f1.pg.photos.yahoo.com/frankiennikki

Marina
August 15th 04, 02:24 PM
"Cathi" > wrote

>
> One thing of concern though .... in the tests the vet did, it would
> appear that Jazzie's glucose levels were high, indicating the
> possibility of diabetes. He's about 7 years old BTW. It could be that
> the levels were high owing to the stress of the fight/wound/etc but
> ..... we shall have to wait and see.

I don't have experience with diabetes in cats, but do have 34 years of
experience with diabetes in me. ;o) We are sending lots of purrs that
Jasper's wound heals soon and that the high glucose was, indeed, due to the
trauma and not a sign of diabetes.

--
Marina, Frank and Nikki
Email marina (dot) kurten (at) pp (dot) inet (dot) fi
Pics at http://uk.f1.pg.photos.yahoo.com/frankiennikki

Marina
August 15th 04, 02:24 PM
"Cathi" > wrote

>
> One thing of concern though .... in the tests the vet did, it would
> appear that Jazzie's glucose levels were high, indicating the
> possibility of diabetes. He's about 7 years old BTW. It could be that
> the levels were high owing to the stress of the fight/wound/etc but
> ..... we shall have to wait and see.

I don't have experience with diabetes in cats, but do have 34 years of
experience with diabetes in me. ;o) We are sending lots of purrs that
Jasper's wound heals soon and that the high glucose was, indeed, due to the
trauma and not a sign of diabetes.

--
Marina, Frank and Nikki
Email marina (dot) kurten (at) pp (dot) inet (dot) fi
Pics at http://uk.f1.pg.photos.yahoo.com/frankiennikki

~*Connie*~
August 15th 04, 04:49 PM
jasper could definitely have his sugars off cause of stress. But if he is
diabetic it is highly manageable. Not to worry. My own kitty has been
diabetic for a number of years, and we did actually have a hard time
regulating him. despite using PZI insulin, and DM food. We got him to an
herbalist, who prescribed herbs, and we had him regulated in no time.
"Cathi" > wrote in message
...
> Those of you who were posting here four years ago or so may remember
> that Jasper, our handsome black DSH male, has a small bald patch on one
> leg. He was involved in a fight; his leg was bitten, and one of the
> many punctures became infected with an abcess as the result. Luckily
> our fantastic vet was able to sort things out for him, and the bald spot
> is all there is to show. No limping or movement problems.
>
> Well, Jasper's been bitten again, on the same leg. This time we were
> able to see the wound, and he's been to the vet to have it cleaned up
> and bandaged. He's getting around with relative ease, and his
> appetite hasn't been diminished!
>
> One thing of concern though .... in the tests the vet did, it would
> appear that Jazzie's glucose levels were high, indicating the
> possibility of diabetes. He's about 7 years old BTW. It could be that
> the levels were high owing to the stress of the fight/wound/etc but
> ..... we shall have to wait and see.
>
> Anyone here with experience of diabetic cats - any advice you can offer?
> It may be something that can be controlled with diet, according to our
> vet; Jasper, whilst a solid cat, isn't fat, and is very active.
>
> TIA
>
>
> --
> Cathi

~*Connie*~
August 15th 04, 04:49 PM
jasper could definitely have his sugars off cause of stress. But if he is
diabetic it is highly manageable. Not to worry. My own kitty has been
diabetic for a number of years, and we did actually have a hard time
regulating him. despite using PZI insulin, and DM food. We got him to an
herbalist, who prescribed herbs, and we had him regulated in no time.
"Cathi" > wrote in message
...
> Those of you who were posting here four years ago or so may remember
> that Jasper, our handsome black DSH male, has a small bald patch on one
> leg. He was involved in a fight; his leg was bitten, and one of the
> many punctures became infected with an abcess as the result. Luckily
> our fantastic vet was able to sort things out for him, and the bald spot
> is all there is to show. No limping or movement problems.
>
> Well, Jasper's been bitten again, on the same leg. This time we were
> able to see the wound, and he's been to the vet to have it cleaned up
> and bandaged. He's getting around with relative ease, and his
> appetite hasn't been diminished!
>
> One thing of concern though .... in the tests the vet did, it would
> appear that Jazzie's glucose levels were high, indicating the
> possibility of diabetes. He's about 7 years old BTW. It could be that
> the levels were high owing to the stress of the fight/wound/etc but
> ..... we shall have to wait and see.
>
> Anyone here with experience of diabetic cats - any advice you can offer?
> It may be something that can be controlled with diet, according to our
> vet; Jasper, whilst a solid cat, isn't fat, and is very active.
>
> TIA
>
>
> --
> Cathi

~*Connie*~
August 15th 04, 04:49 PM
jasper could definitely have his sugars off cause of stress. But if he is
diabetic it is highly manageable. Not to worry. My own kitty has been
diabetic for a number of years, and we did actually have a hard time
regulating him. despite using PZI insulin, and DM food. We got him to an
herbalist, who prescribed herbs, and we had him regulated in no time.
"Cathi" > wrote in message
...
> Those of you who were posting here four years ago or so may remember
> that Jasper, our handsome black DSH male, has a small bald patch on one
> leg. He was involved in a fight; his leg was bitten, and one of the
> many punctures became infected with an abcess as the result. Luckily
> our fantastic vet was able to sort things out for him, and the bald spot
> is all there is to show. No limping or movement problems.
>
> Well, Jasper's been bitten again, on the same leg. This time we were
> able to see the wound, and he's been to the vet to have it cleaned up
> and bandaged. He's getting around with relative ease, and his
> appetite hasn't been diminished!
>
> One thing of concern though .... in the tests the vet did, it would
> appear that Jazzie's glucose levels were high, indicating the
> possibility of diabetes. He's about 7 years old BTW. It could be that
> the levels were high owing to the stress of the fight/wound/etc but
> ..... we shall have to wait and see.
>
> Anyone here with experience of diabetic cats - any advice you can offer?
> It may be something that can be controlled with diet, according to our
> vet; Jasper, whilst a solid cat, isn't fat, and is very active.
>
> TIA
>
>
> --
> Cathi

Cathi
August 15th 04, 06:31 PM
In message >, CATherine
> writes
> Diet dry food has less carbs than regular or senior.
That's useful to know. Carrie is on a "senior" diet - when Jasper
allows her to finish it off, that is. Maybe that's part of the problem
.....

Goldfish would be far less trouble!

--
Cathi

Cathi
August 15th 04, 06:31 PM
In message >, CATherine
> writes
> Diet dry food has less carbs than regular or senior.
That's useful to know. Carrie is on a "senior" diet - when Jasper
allows her to finish it off, that is. Maybe that's part of the problem
.....

Goldfish would be far less trouble!

--
Cathi

Cathi
August 15th 04, 06:31 PM
In message >, CATherine
> writes
> Diet dry food has less carbs than regular or senior.
That's useful to know. Carrie is on a "senior" diet - when Jasper
allows her to finish it off, that is. Maybe that's part of the problem
.....

Goldfish would be far less trouble!

--
Cathi

Larry
August 15th 04, 07:03 PM
Diabetes is a very treatable disease. However many people do want to put
up with the treatment. I presently have three diabetic cats that I adopted
when their caretakers no longer wanted them. My latest was not being
treated when I adopted him. He, Mario is now doing fine after about two
months of twice daily insulin shots and a dental to pull 5 teeth.
--
Larry - Owned by eight cats

Larry
August 15th 04, 07:03 PM
Diabetes is a very treatable disease. However many people do want to put
up with the treatment. I presently have three diabetic cats that I adopted
when their caretakers no longer wanted them. My latest was not being
treated when I adopted him. He, Mario is now doing fine after about two
months of twice daily insulin shots and a dental to pull 5 teeth.
--
Larry - Owned by eight cats

Larry
August 15th 04, 07:03 PM
Diabetes is a very treatable disease. However many people do want to put
up with the treatment. I presently have three diabetic cats that I adopted
when their caretakers no longer wanted them. My latest was not being
treated when I adopted him. He, Mario is now doing fine after about two
months of twice daily insulin shots and a dental to pull 5 teeth.
--
Larry - Owned by eight cats

JBHajos
August 15th 04, 07:58 PM
On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 18:03:40 GMT, "Larry" >
wrote:

>Diabetes is a very treatable disease. However many people do want to put
>up with the treatment. I presently have three diabetic cats that I adopted
>when their caretakers no longer wanted them.

Right - diabetes is treatable and manageable - but not curable. And
there are different kinds of experiences and histories with individual
cats - some respond well to a treatment while others don't. Since our
Hobo's has a yo-yo effect, the vet is considering putting him on a
different type of insulin. We'll see how that goes, hoping for a good
solution. Many kudos to you for adopting and caring for those
unfortunate kitties from whom love and commitment were withdrawn when
their care became "troublesome."

Jeanne



My latest was not being
>treated when I adopted him. He, Mario is now doing fine after about two
>months of twice daily insulin shots and a dental to pull 5 teeth.
>--
>Larry - Owned by eight cats
>
>

JBHajos
August 15th 04, 07:58 PM
On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 18:03:40 GMT, "Larry" >
wrote:

>Diabetes is a very treatable disease. However many people do want to put
>up with the treatment. I presently have three diabetic cats that I adopted
>when their caretakers no longer wanted them.

Right - diabetes is treatable and manageable - but not curable. And
there are different kinds of experiences and histories with individual
cats - some respond well to a treatment while others don't. Since our
Hobo's has a yo-yo effect, the vet is considering putting him on a
different type of insulin. We'll see how that goes, hoping for a good
solution. Many kudos to you for adopting and caring for those
unfortunate kitties from whom love and commitment were withdrawn when
their care became "troublesome."

Jeanne



My latest was not being
>treated when I adopted him. He, Mario is now doing fine after about two
>months of twice daily insulin shots and a dental to pull 5 teeth.
>--
>Larry - Owned by eight cats
>
>

JBHajos
August 15th 04, 07:58 PM
On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 18:03:40 GMT, "Larry" >
wrote:

>Diabetes is a very treatable disease. However many people do want to put
>up with the treatment. I presently have three diabetic cats that I adopted
>when their caretakers no longer wanted them.

Right - diabetes is treatable and manageable - but not curable. And
there are different kinds of experiences and histories with individual
cats - some respond well to a treatment while others don't. Since our
Hobo's has a yo-yo effect, the vet is considering putting him on a
different type of insulin. We'll see how that goes, hoping for a good
solution. Many kudos to you for adopting and caring for those
unfortunate kitties from whom love and commitment were withdrawn when
their care became "troublesome."

Jeanne



My latest was not being
>treated when I adopted him. He, Mario is now doing fine after about two
>months of twice daily insulin shots and a dental to pull 5 teeth.
>--
>Larry - Owned by eight cats
>
>

polonca12000
August 15th 04, 10:01 PM
Thank you so much for taking care of the diabetic kitties!
Best wishes and purrs,
--
Polonca & Soncek

"Larry" > wrote in message
link.net...
> Diabetes is a very treatable disease. However many people do want to put
> up with the treatment. I presently have three diabetic cats that I
adopted
> when their caretakers no longer wanted them. My latest was not being
> treated when I adopted him. He, Mario is now doing fine after about two
> months of twice daily insulin shots and a dental to pull 5 teeth.
> --
> Larry - Owned by eight cats
>
>

polonca12000
August 15th 04, 10:01 PM
Thank you so much for taking care of the diabetic kitties!
Best wishes and purrs,
--
Polonca & Soncek

"Larry" > wrote in message
link.net...
> Diabetes is a very treatable disease. However many people do want to put
> up with the treatment. I presently have three diabetic cats that I
adopted
> when their caretakers no longer wanted them. My latest was not being
> treated when I adopted him. He, Mario is now doing fine after about two
> months of twice daily insulin shots and a dental to pull 5 teeth.
> --
> Larry - Owned by eight cats
>
>

polonca12000
August 15th 04, 10:01 PM
Thank you so much for taking care of the diabetic kitties!
Best wishes and purrs,
--
Polonca & Soncek

"Larry" > wrote in message
link.net...
> Diabetes is a very treatable disease. However many people do want to put
> up with the treatment. I presently have three diabetic cats that I
adopted
> when their caretakers no longer wanted them. My latest was not being
> treated when I adopted him. He, Mario is now doing fine after about two
> months of twice daily insulin shots and a dental to pull 5 teeth.
> --
> Larry - Owned by eight cats
>
>

Howard Berkowitz
August 15th 04, 11:51 PM
In article >,
wrote:

> On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 18:03:40 GMT, "Larry" >
> wrote:
>
> >Diabetes is a very treatable disease. However many people do want to
> >put
> >up with the treatment. I presently have three diabetic cats that I
> >adopted
> >when their caretakers no longer wanted them.
>
> Right - diabetes is treatable and manageable - but not curable. And
> there are different kinds of experiences and histories with individual
> cats - some respond well to a treatment while others don't. Since our
> Hobo's has a yo-yo effect, the vet is considering putting him on a
> different type of insulin. We'll see how that goes, hoping for a good
> solution. Many kudos to you for adopting and caring for those
> unfortunate kitties from whom love and commitment were withdrawn when
> their care became "troublesome."
>

At least in humans, one of the challenges is that insulin is also an
appetite stimulant. With the exception of metformin, every class of
diabetic treatment drug in humans tends to cause weight gain because
they improve the transfer of sugar into cells. That's good in its way,
because it's the surplus of circulating sugar (and its metabolites) that
does the damage.

If there are filling but low-calorie foods, they will help. Does Jasper,
by any chance, like any fresh vegetables?

Howard Berkowitz
August 15th 04, 11:51 PM
In article >,
wrote:

> On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 18:03:40 GMT, "Larry" >
> wrote:
>
> >Diabetes is a very treatable disease. However many people do want to
> >put
> >up with the treatment. I presently have three diabetic cats that I
> >adopted
> >when their caretakers no longer wanted them.
>
> Right - diabetes is treatable and manageable - but not curable. And
> there are different kinds of experiences and histories with individual
> cats - some respond well to a treatment while others don't. Since our
> Hobo's has a yo-yo effect, the vet is considering putting him on a
> different type of insulin. We'll see how that goes, hoping for a good
> solution. Many kudos to you for adopting and caring for those
> unfortunate kitties from whom love and commitment were withdrawn when
> their care became "troublesome."
>

At least in humans, one of the challenges is that insulin is also an
appetite stimulant. With the exception of metformin, every class of
diabetic treatment drug in humans tends to cause weight gain because
they improve the transfer of sugar into cells. That's good in its way,
because it's the surplus of circulating sugar (and its metabolites) that
does the damage.

If there are filling but low-calorie foods, they will help. Does Jasper,
by any chance, like any fresh vegetables?

Howard Berkowitz
August 15th 04, 11:51 PM
In article >,
wrote:

> On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 18:03:40 GMT, "Larry" >
> wrote:
>
> >Diabetes is a very treatable disease. However many people do want to
> >put
> >up with the treatment. I presently have three diabetic cats that I
> >adopted
> >when their caretakers no longer wanted them.
>
> Right - diabetes is treatable and manageable - but not curable. And
> there are different kinds of experiences and histories with individual
> cats - some respond well to a treatment while others don't. Since our
> Hobo's has a yo-yo effect, the vet is considering putting him on a
> different type of insulin. We'll see how that goes, hoping for a good
> solution. Many kudos to you for adopting and caring for those
> unfortunate kitties from whom love and commitment were withdrawn when
> their care became "troublesome."
>

At least in humans, one of the challenges is that insulin is also an
appetite stimulant. With the exception of metformin, every class of
diabetic treatment drug in humans tends to cause weight gain because
they improve the transfer of sugar into cells. That's good in its way,
because it's the surplus of circulating sugar (and its metabolites) that
does the damage.

If there are filling but low-calorie foods, they will help. Does Jasper,
by any chance, like any fresh vegetables?

Singh
August 16th 04, 12:41 AM
Cathi wrote:
(snip)

One thing of concern though .... in the tests the vet did, it would
appear that Jazzie's glucose levels were high, indicating the possibility of
diabetes. He's about 7 years old BTW. It could be that the levels were
high owing to the stress of the fight/wound/etc but ..... we shall have to
wait and see.

For the last 4 years of his life Fritzie was diabetic, and he was 15 when he
tested positive for it.

We gave him insulin twice a day, and fed him prescription cat food from the
vet, either Hills or Purina. If he gets finicky like Fritzie did, talk to
your vet about adding fat-free, unsalted chicken or beef broth from the
health food section of the grocery store to the dry food and that'll flavor
up the prescription stuff.

It is easy as hell to shoot up a cat: you get him by the scruff, pinch it up
a bit so you make sort of a small flesh-tent, insert the needle quickly and
you're done. The key is to do it quickly, then your cat won't even flinch.
Your vet may even prescribe human-type glucose-regulating pills like Precose
or Glipizide.

Cats can go into remission with proper care and stay there for the remainer
of their lives, or slip back. Fritzie went into remission twice. Ask the vet
to show you the signs of hypoglycemia just in case. You'll spend the first
few months of his treatment getting tested once to twice a month depending
on initial results. He'll get a simple test called a glucosamine which you
get the results that day. The vet may want to do a more complex test called
fructosamine every two to three months, which shows the broader picture: the
diabetes in terms of glucose levels, as well as how other organs are hit by
it. Diabetes can hit the kidneys in later stages and the vet may want to put
your cat on potassium supplements, and have you do supplemental fluids every
other day or so. You do this just like giving the cat insulin, only the
needle's bigger and you may have to get help holding the IV bag. Or the cat.
Don't panic, please! Each case is individual. And if you caught it early in
your cat, good for you! Like cancer, early detection is half the battle won.
Diabetic cats can and do go on for a good many years after diagnosis.

We learned about Fritzie after I had oral surgery and my then-fiance was
staying overnight to make sure I didn't do anything stupid while on the
drugs. He noticed that Fritzie was in bad shape and took us to the emergency
vet, where we learned that Fritzie was dangerously diabetic and had less
than 50% chance of making it through the night. He was 15 then. He lived,
tough boy that he was, and stayed almost 4 more years. I still miss him.

God willing your boy's not diabetic, but if he is the good news is that you
found it early and can take proactive measures to give him an optimum
quality of living. Taking care of it isn't as difficult as you may think.
Best to you, and to your baby too!

Blessings,

Baha

Singh
August 16th 04, 12:41 AM
Cathi wrote:
(snip)

One thing of concern though .... in the tests the vet did, it would
appear that Jazzie's glucose levels were high, indicating the possibility of
diabetes. He's about 7 years old BTW. It could be that the levels were
high owing to the stress of the fight/wound/etc but ..... we shall have to
wait and see.

For the last 4 years of his life Fritzie was diabetic, and he was 15 when he
tested positive for it.

We gave him insulin twice a day, and fed him prescription cat food from the
vet, either Hills or Purina. If he gets finicky like Fritzie did, talk to
your vet about adding fat-free, unsalted chicken or beef broth from the
health food section of the grocery store to the dry food and that'll flavor
up the prescription stuff.

It is easy as hell to shoot up a cat: you get him by the scruff, pinch it up
a bit so you make sort of a small flesh-tent, insert the needle quickly and
you're done. The key is to do it quickly, then your cat won't even flinch.
Your vet may even prescribe human-type glucose-regulating pills like Precose
or Glipizide.

Cats can go into remission with proper care and stay there for the remainer
of their lives, or slip back. Fritzie went into remission twice. Ask the vet
to show you the signs of hypoglycemia just in case. You'll spend the first
few months of his treatment getting tested once to twice a month depending
on initial results. He'll get a simple test called a glucosamine which you
get the results that day. The vet may want to do a more complex test called
fructosamine every two to three months, which shows the broader picture: the
diabetes in terms of glucose levels, as well as how other organs are hit by
it. Diabetes can hit the kidneys in later stages and the vet may want to put
your cat on potassium supplements, and have you do supplemental fluids every
other day or so. You do this just like giving the cat insulin, only the
needle's bigger and you may have to get help holding the IV bag. Or the cat.
Don't panic, please! Each case is individual. And if you caught it early in
your cat, good for you! Like cancer, early detection is half the battle won.
Diabetic cats can and do go on for a good many years after diagnosis.

We learned about Fritzie after I had oral surgery and my then-fiance was
staying overnight to make sure I didn't do anything stupid while on the
drugs. He noticed that Fritzie was in bad shape and took us to the emergency
vet, where we learned that Fritzie was dangerously diabetic and had less
than 50% chance of making it through the night. He was 15 then. He lived,
tough boy that he was, and stayed almost 4 more years. I still miss him.

God willing your boy's not diabetic, but if he is the good news is that you
found it early and can take proactive measures to give him an optimum
quality of living. Taking care of it isn't as difficult as you may think.
Best to you, and to your baby too!

Blessings,

Baha

Singh
August 16th 04, 12:41 AM
Cathi wrote:
(snip)

One thing of concern though .... in the tests the vet did, it would
appear that Jazzie's glucose levels were high, indicating the possibility of
diabetes. He's about 7 years old BTW. It could be that the levels were
high owing to the stress of the fight/wound/etc but ..... we shall have to
wait and see.

For the last 4 years of his life Fritzie was diabetic, and he was 15 when he
tested positive for it.

We gave him insulin twice a day, and fed him prescription cat food from the
vet, either Hills or Purina. If he gets finicky like Fritzie did, talk to
your vet about adding fat-free, unsalted chicken or beef broth from the
health food section of the grocery store to the dry food and that'll flavor
up the prescription stuff.

It is easy as hell to shoot up a cat: you get him by the scruff, pinch it up
a bit so you make sort of a small flesh-tent, insert the needle quickly and
you're done. The key is to do it quickly, then your cat won't even flinch.
Your vet may even prescribe human-type glucose-regulating pills like Precose
or Glipizide.

Cats can go into remission with proper care and stay there for the remainer
of their lives, or slip back. Fritzie went into remission twice. Ask the vet
to show you the signs of hypoglycemia just in case. You'll spend the first
few months of his treatment getting tested once to twice a month depending
on initial results. He'll get a simple test called a glucosamine which you
get the results that day. The vet may want to do a more complex test called
fructosamine every two to three months, which shows the broader picture: the
diabetes in terms of glucose levels, as well as how other organs are hit by
it. Diabetes can hit the kidneys in later stages and the vet may want to put
your cat on potassium supplements, and have you do supplemental fluids every
other day or so. You do this just like giving the cat insulin, only the
needle's bigger and you may have to get help holding the IV bag. Or the cat.
Don't panic, please! Each case is individual. And if you caught it early in
your cat, good for you! Like cancer, early detection is half the battle won.
Diabetic cats can and do go on for a good many years after diagnosis.

We learned about Fritzie after I had oral surgery and my then-fiance was
staying overnight to make sure I didn't do anything stupid while on the
drugs. He noticed that Fritzie was in bad shape and took us to the emergency
vet, where we learned that Fritzie was dangerously diabetic and had less
than 50% chance of making it through the night. He was 15 then. He lived,
tough boy that he was, and stayed almost 4 more years. I still miss him.

God willing your boy's not diabetic, but if he is the good news is that you
found it early and can take proactive measures to give him an optimum
quality of living. Taking care of it isn't as difficult as you may think.
Best to you, and to your baby too!

Blessings,

Baha

Steve Touchstone
August 16th 04, 01:19 AM
On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 06:27:17 +0100, Cathi
> wrote:

<snip>
>Anyone here with experience of diabetic cats - any advice you can offer?
>It may be something that can be controlled with diet, according to our
>vet; Jasper, whilst a solid cat, isn't fat, and is very active.
Sorry no experience or helpful hints, but are sending purrs
--
Steve Touchstone,
faithful servant of Sammy, Little Bit and Rocky

[remove Junk for email]
Home Page: http://www.sirinet.net/~stouchst/index.html
Cat Pix: http://www.sirinet.net/~stouchst/animals.html

Steve Touchstone
August 16th 04, 01:19 AM
On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 06:27:17 +0100, Cathi
> wrote:

<snip>
>Anyone here with experience of diabetic cats - any advice you can offer?
>It may be something that can be controlled with diet, according to our
>vet; Jasper, whilst a solid cat, isn't fat, and is very active.
Sorry no experience or helpful hints, but are sending purrs
--
Steve Touchstone,
faithful servant of Sammy, Little Bit and Rocky

[remove Junk for email]
Home Page: http://www.sirinet.net/~stouchst/index.html
Cat Pix: http://www.sirinet.net/~stouchst/animals.html

Steve Touchstone
August 16th 04, 01:19 AM
On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 06:27:17 +0100, Cathi
> wrote:

<snip>
>Anyone here with experience of diabetic cats - any advice you can offer?
>It may be something that can be controlled with diet, according to our
>vet; Jasper, whilst a solid cat, isn't fat, and is very active.
Sorry no experience or helpful hints, but are sending purrs
--
Steve Touchstone,
faithful servant of Sammy, Little Bit and Rocky

[remove Junk for email]
Home Page: http://www.sirinet.net/~stouchst/index.html
Cat Pix: http://www.sirinet.net/~stouchst/animals.html

Cathi
August 16th 04, 07:18 AM
In message >, Howard
Berkowitz > writes
>
>At least in humans, one of the challenges is that insulin is also an
>appetite stimulant. With the exception of metformin, every class of
>diabetic treatment drug in humans tends to cause weight gain because
>they improve the transfer of sugar into cells. That's good in its way,
>because it's the surplus of circulating sugar (and its metabolites) that
>does the damage.
>
>If there are filling but low-calorie foods, they will help. Does Jasper,
>by any chance, like any fresh vegetables?

Have never tried! - are we taking fresh and raw, and if so, which veg?

We're still having no problems at all getting him to take his
antibiotics. I have no idea at all what does it, but he seems to view
them more as a kitty treat than a tablet. That's something of a weight
off my mind as we're going away next weekend, and I'd have to arrange
with his boarding cattery for pilling.

--
Cathi

Cathi
August 16th 04, 07:18 AM
In message >, Howard
Berkowitz > writes
>
>At least in humans, one of the challenges is that insulin is also an
>appetite stimulant. With the exception of metformin, every class of
>diabetic treatment drug in humans tends to cause weight gain because
>they improve the transfer of sugar into cells. That's good in its way,
>because it's the surplus of circulating sugar (and its metabolites) that
>does the damage.
>
>If there are filling but low-calorie foods, they will help. Does Jasper,
>by any chance, like any fresh vegetables?

Have never tried! - are we taking fresh and raw, and if so, which veg?

We're still having no problems at all getting him to take his
antibiotics. I have no idea at all what does it, but he seems to view
them more as a kitty treat than a tablet. That's something of a weight
off my mind as we're going away next weekend, and I'd have to arrange
with his boarding cattery for pilling.

--
Cathi

Cathi
August 16th 04, 07:18 AM
In message >, Howard
Berkowitz > writes
>
>At least in humans, one of the challenges is that insulin is also an
>appetite stimulant. With the exception of metformin, every class of
>diabetic treatment drug in humans tends to cause weight gain because
>they improve the transfer of sugar into cells. That's good in its way,
>because it's the surplus of circulating sugar (and its metabolites) that
>does the damage.
>
>If there are filling but low-calorie foods, they will help. Does Jasper,
>by any chance, like any fresh vegetables?

Have never tried! - are we taking fresh and raw, and if so, which veg?

We're still having no problems at all getting him to take his
antibiotics. I have no idea at all what does it, but he seems to view
them more as a kitty treat than a tablet. That's something of a weight
off my mind as we're going away next weekend, and I'd have to arrange
with his boarding cattery for pilling.

--
Cathi

Howard Berkowitz
August 17th 04, 03:19 AM
In article >, Cathi
> wrote:

> In message >, Howard
> Berkowitz > writes
> >
> >At least in humans, one of the challenges is that insulin is also an
> >appetite stimulant. With the exception of metformin, every class of
> >diabetic treatment drug in humans tends to cause weight gain because
> >they improve the transfer of sugar into cells. That's good in its way,
> >because it's the surplus of circulating sugar (and its metabolites) that
> >does the damage.
> >
> >If there are filling but low-calorie foods, they will help. Does Jasper,
> >by any chance, like any fresh vegetables?
>
> Have never tried! - are we taking fresh and raw, and if so, which veg?

It varies wildly. Although they would be higher in sugar, I've seen
several cats like melon, and some adored tomato-based spaghetti sauce.
Chatterley went through stages, such as being willing to kill for the
juice from canned lima beans.

Given cats will eat grass, maybe alfalfa or bean sprouts?

>
> We're still having no problems at all getting him to take his
> antibiotics. I have no idea at all what does it, but he seems to view
> them more as a kitty treat than a tablet. That's something of a weight
> off my mind as we're going away next weekend, and I'd have to arrange
> with his boarding cattery for pilling.

Clifford used to get a human pediatric version of amoxicillin, which had
a strawberries and cream flavor. It never failed...he'd struggle against
getting the liquid squirted into his mouth...then stop...lick his
lips...lick the dropper...and inquire *more*? While he was a most
intelligent cat, I never could get across the idea that it would be
easier and more pleasant for everyone if he'd just lick it up to begin
with.

Howard Berkowitz
August 17th 04, 03:19 AM
In article >, Cathi
> wrote:

> In message >, Howard
> Berkowitz > writes
> >
> >At least in humans, one of the challenges is that insulin is also an
> >appetite stimulant. With the exception of metformin, every class of
> >diabetic treatment drug in humans tends to cause weight gain because
> >they improve the transfer of sugar into cells. That's good in its way,
> >because it's the surplus of circulating sugar (and its metabolites) that
> >does the damage.
> >
> >If there are filling but low-calorie foods, they will help. Does Jasper,
> >by any chance, like any fresh vegetables?
>
> Have never tried! - are we taking fresh and raw, and if so, which veg?

It varies wildly. Although they would be higher in sugar, I've seen
several cats like melon, and some adored tomato-based spaghetti sauce.
Chatterley went through stages, such as being willing to kill for the
juice from canned lima beans.

Given cats will eat grass, maybe alfalfa or bean sprouts?

>
> We're still having no problems at all getting him to take his
> antibiotics. I have no idea at all what does it, but he seems to view
> them more as a kitty treat than a tablet. That's something of a weight
> off my mind as we're going away next weekend, and I'd have to arrange
> with his boarding cattery for pilling.

Clifford used to get a human pediatric version of amoxicillin, which had
a strawberries and cream flavor. It never failed...he'd struggle against
getting the liquid squirted into his mouth...then stop...lick his
lips...lick the dropper...and inquire *more*? While he was a most
intelligent cat, I never could get across the idea that it would be
easier and more pleasant for everyone if he'd just lick it up to begin
with.

Howard Berkowitz
August 17th 04, 03:19 AM
In article >, Cathi
> wrote:

> In message >, Howard
> Berkowitz > writes
> >
> >At least in humans, one of the challenges is that insulin is also an
> >appetite stimulant. With the exception of metformin, every class of
> >diabetic treatment drug in humans tends to cause weight gain because
> >they improve the transfer of sugar into cells. That's good in its way,
> >because it's the surplus of circulating sugar (and its metabolites) that
> >does the damage.
> >
> >If there are filling but low-calorie foods, they will help. Does Jasper,
> >by any chance, like any fresh vegetables?
>
> Have never tried! - are we taking fresh and raw, and if so, which veg?

It varies wildly. Although they would be higher in sugar, I've seen
several cats like melon, and some adored tomato-based spaghetti sauce.
Chatterley went through stages, such as being willing to kill for the
juice from canned lima beans.

Given cats will eat grass, maybe alfalfa or bean sprouts?

>
> We're still having no problems at all getting him to take his
> antibiotics. I have no idea at all what does it, but he seems to view
> them more as a kitty treat than a tablet. That's something of a weight
> off my mind as we're going away next weekend, and I'd have to arrange
> with his boarding cattery for pilling.

Clifford used to get a human pediatric version of amoxicillin, which had
a strawberries and cream flavor. It never failed...he'd struggle against
getting the liquid squirted into his mouth...then stop...lick his
lips...lick the dropper...and inquire *more*? While he was a most
intelligent cat, I never could get across the idea that it would be
easier and more pleasant for everyone if he'd just lick it up to begin
with.