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Rhonda
September 17th 05, 01:49 AM
I've never tried Feliway on our cats, but may suggest it for the scaredy
cat in Portland (he's still there for the time being, btw.) I was
thinking she might try one last shot. If she won't try it, he will
probably need something to help him wherever he goes.

How calming is it? Does it really work? The cat isn't peeing
inappropriately, but has been abandoned by his human and won't come out
of the closet.

I have read the web site, and their calming test was only done on
fifty-some cats, so wanted to get your experiences too.

Thanks,

Rhonda

Karen
September 17th 05, 02:05 AM
On 2005-09-16 19:49:55 -0500, Rhonda > said:

> I've never tried Feliway on our cats, but may suggest it for the
> scaredy cat in Portland (he's still there for the time being, btw.) I
> was thinking she might try one last shot. If she won't try it, he will
> probably need something to help him wherever he goes.
>
> How calming is it? Does it really work? The cat isn't peeing
> inappropriately, but has been abandoned by his human and won't come out
> of the closet.
>
> I have read the web site, and their calming test was only done on
> fifty-some cats, so wanted to get your experiences too.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Rhonda


It always seemed to reduce stress in our house. When Pearl would get
more hissy and anxious with Grant and Sugar, I would find the diffuser
almost empty. They did way better as long as the diffuser was not out.
I really do think it helps. So he is still having trouble? Poor kitty.

MaryL
September 17th 05, 02:07 AM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> I've never tried Feliway on our cats, but may suggest it for the scaredy
> cat in Portland (he's still there for the time being, btw.) I was thinking
> she might try one last shot. If she won't try it, he will probably need
> something to help him wherever he goes.
>
> How calming is it? Does it really work? The cat isn't peeing
> inappropriately, but has been abandoned by his human and won't come out of
> the closet.
>
> I have read the web site, and their calming test was only done on
> fifty-some cats, so wanted to get your experiences too.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Rhonda
>

Feliway is used for behavior modification and can be very useful in reducing
stress. It is available in plug-in diffusers (with refills available) and as
a spray. I used the plug-ins so it could be working all the time. I no
longer need it on a regular basis, but it was very helpful when I adopted
Duffy and wanted to introduce him to Holly (who had previously been very
aggressive toward other cats). Now I use it only when I think there could be
some stress, such as when I will be away for a few days (very rare for me)
and have a petsitter care for my cats. The spray is excellent for an
occasional use, such as spraying the carrier about 20 minutes before you
take your cat to the vet, but the plug-in diffuser is better for long-term
use because it releases premeasured doses. Refills can be purchased for the
dispenser. One bottle lasts a little more than a month.

Here some information from an Ohio State University study on this type of
product: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/11/001129074611.htm

MaryL

My cats --
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e

DevilsPGD
September 17th 05, 04:02 AM
In message <I%[email protected]> "MaryL"
-OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote:

>Feliway is used for behavior modification and can be very useful in reducing
>stress. It is available in plug-in diffusers (with refills available) and as
>a spray. I used the plug-ins so it could be working all the time. I no
>longer need it on a regular basis, but it was very helpful when I adopted
>Duffy and wanted to introduce him to Holly (who had previously been very
>aggressive toward other cats). Now I use it only when I think there could be
>some stress, such as when I will be away for a few days (very rare for me)
>and have a petsitter care for my cats. The spray is excellent for an
>occasional use, such as spraying the carrier about 20 minutes before you
>take your cat to the vet, but the plug-in diffuser is better for long-term
>use because it releases premeasured doses. Refills can be purchased for the
>dispenser. One bottle lasts a little more than a month.

Does anybody know of a good Canadian vendor?

--
The preceding post may have contained foul language,
and should not have been read by young children.

MaryL
September 17th 05, 05:00 AM
"DevilsPGD" > wrote in message
...
> In message <I%[email protected]> "MaryL"
> -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote:
>
>>Feliway is used for behavior modification and can be very useful in
>>reducing
>>stress. It is available in plug-in diffusers (with refills available) and
>>as
>>a spray. I used the plug-ins so it could be working all the time. I no
>>longer need it on a regular basis, but it was very helpful when I adopted
>>Duffy and wanted to introduce him to Holly (who had previously been very
>>aggressive toward other cats). Now I use it only when I think there could
>>be
>>some stress, such as when I will be away for a few days (very rare for me)
>>and have a petsitter care for my cats. The spray is excellent for an
>>occasional use, such as spraying the carrier about 20 minutes before you
>>take your cat to the vet, but the plug-in diffuser is better for long-term
>>use because it releases premeasured doses. Refills can be purchased for
>>the
>>dispenser. One bottle lasts a little more than a month.
>
> Does anybody know of a good Canadian vendor?
>

Do you have a PetSmart near you? They usually have Feliway. You could also
do a search in Google for "Feliway vendors in Canada" or something similar.

MaryL

Rhonda
September 17th 05, 05:45 AM
Yep, still having trouble, but she still has him. I finally talked to
her this week and he's not going to a shelter. She's keeping him until
we can sort things out. Cross your paws for a miracle, because I think
if he shows some progress very soon she might still try.

The old owner has said she will not come back for him -- excuse is it
would be too stressful for him. I still can't believe that.

I think I'm going to start sniffing Feliway...

Rhonda

Karen wrote:

>
> It always seemed to reduce stress in our house. When Pearl would get
> more hissy and anxious with Grant and Sugar, I would find the diffuser
> almost empty. They did way better as long as the diffuser was not out. I
> really do think it helps. So he is still having trouble? Poor kitty.
>

Rhonda
September 17th 05, 05:46 AM
Thanks for all the info, Mary. This may be worth a try.

Rhonda

MaryL wrote:

> I used the plug-ins so it could be working all the time. I no
> longer need it on a regular basis, but it was very helpful when I adopted
> Duffy and wanted to introduce him to Holly (who had previously been very
> aggressive toward other cats).

Cheryl
September 17th 05, 05:47 AM
On Fri 16 Sep 2005 08:49:55p, Rhonda wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
):

> I've never tried Feliway on our cats, but may suggest it for the
> scaredy cat in Portland (he's still there for the time being,
> btw.) I was thinking she might try one last shot. If she won't
> try it, he will probably need something to help him wherever he
> goes.
>
> How calming is it? Does it really work? The cat isn't peeing
> inappropriately, but has been abandoned by his human and won't
> come out of the closet.
>
> I have read the web site, and their calming test was only done
> on fifty-some cats, so wanted to get your experiences too.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Rhonda
>
>
I keep 2 diffusers at all times in the main living area. I tried it
when I had problems with aggression between 2 cats. I don't recall
noticing much of a difference when I started using it, but I did
notice a difference when they fully evaporated. So to check and see
if the diffusers really were calming them, I refilled them. Things
settled down. So, I say that they have a very subtle effect.

I use the spray for other reasons. Shamrock likes to rub his face
on everything and he knocks things over, rubs on my laptop,
lampshades, many other things. I've found that spraying the Feliway
in my hands and rubbing them on things I don't want him rubbing his
face on stops him. He'll just sniff and back away.

So the person who left him isn't willing to take him even if you
get him there? That's so sad and I hope things work out for that
poor baby.

--
Cheryl

Rhonda
September 17th 05, 05:55 AM
No, I think the big issue, although she says it is so he does not get
stressed out with a move to Utah, is that he peed on her furniture for
awhile after she moved apartments a year or so ago. He apparently was
stressed when everything was packed in boxes. She said he stopped peeing
once everything was unpacked and settled in, but she didn't want to
"lose any more furniture" this time. I know that's the main reason.

I could just kick myself for adopting him to her years ago, but she
loves her first cat and take her with her everywhere. I thought she
would be as devoted to this one.

Rhonda

Cheryl wrote:


> So the person who left him isn't willing to take him even if you
> get him there? That's so sad and I hope things work out for that
> poor baby.

September 17th 05, 06:40 AM
MaryL wrote:
> Feliway is used for behavior modification and can be very useful in reducing
> stress. It is available in plug-in diffusers (with refills available) and as
> a spray. I used the plug-ins so it could be working all the time. I no
> longer need it on a regular basis, but it was very helpful when I adopted
> Duffy and wanted to introduce him to Holly (who had previously been very
> aggressive toward other cats). Now I use it only when I think there could be
> some stress, such as when I will be away for a few days (very rare for me)
> and have a petsitter care for my cats. The spray is excellent for an
> occasional use, such as spraying the carrier about 20 minutes before you
> take your cat to the vet, but the plug-in diffuser is better for long-term
> use because it releases premeasured doses. Refills can be purchased for the
> dispenser. One bottle lasts a little more than a month.
>
> Here some information from an Ohio State University study on this type of
> product: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/11/001129074611.htm

Thanks, that was really helpful. I don't need it now but at least I
know how to scientifically deduce my cat is relaxing - eating, sitting,
and grooming, unlike when she awoke from a nightmare and launched
herself off my bare lap. This left me quite bloody and mighty annoyed.
Next time I won't play with her toes while she is sleeping :) (just a
coincidence I'm sure)

DevilsPGD
September 17th 05, 06:46 AM
In message <[email protected] com>
A.Melon > wrote:

>Rhonda wrote...
>
>>I think I'm going to start sniffing Feliway...
>
>I want to sniff your pussy, Honey
>

Wow, classy.

--
You're not as stupid as you look, or sound, or our best testing indicates.

Cheryl
September 17th 05, 06:48 AM
On Sat 17 Sep 2005 12:55:21a, Rhonda wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
):

> I could just kick myself for adopting him to her years ago, but
> she loves her first cat and take her with her everywhere. I
> thought she would be as devoted to this one.

You just never know. When it comes to rehoming an animal you can only
go on even the little bit you know. Sometimes it isn't enough.

He'll be ok honey. Maybe he needs to go somewhere with a young cat.
Maybe not a tiny kitten, but maybe a 6 month old. Someone he can beat
up, someone who'll look up to him even through the beatings, and try
and fail to become top cat. LOL Whoa, that happened here, but the
younger is becoming the top cat. :)

--
Cheryl

Karen
September 17th 05, 03:02 PM
On 2005-09-16 23:45:13 -0500, Rhonda > said:

> Yep, still having trouble, but she still has him. I finally talked to
> her this week and he's not going to a shelter. She's keeping him until
> we can sort things out. Cross your paws for a miracle, because I think
> if he shows some progress very soon she might still try.
>
> The old owner has said she will not come back for him -- excuse is it
> would be too stressful for him. I still can't believe that.
>
> I think I'm going to start sniffing Feliway...
>
> Rhonda
>
> Karen wrote:
>
>>
>> It always seemed to reduce stress in our house. When Pearl would get
>> more hissy and anxious with Grant and Sugar, I would find the diffuser
>> almost empty. They did way better as long as the diffuser was not out.
>> I really do think it helps. So he is still having trouble? Poor kitty.

I seriously would consider a large cage with amenties and draped. He
sounds soooo traumatized that a small covered space might be calming
and allow him to feel "safe" while he gets used to her. Just like you
would do with a feral cat.

Rhonda
September 18th 05, 07:52 PM
Thanks, Cheryl. Yes, I agree he would be happier with another cat,
especially since he has had a cat-friend his whole life.

I could never do cat adoptions at a shelter -- just too much at stake
with each decision.

Rhonda

Cheryl wrote:

>
> You just never know. When it comes to rehoming an animal you can only
> go on even the little bit you know. Sometimes it isn't enough.
>
> He'll be ok honey. Maybe he needs to go somewhere with a young cat.
> Maybe not a tiny kitten, but maybe a 6 month old. Someone he can beat
> up, someone who'll look up to him even through the beatings, and try
> and fail to become top cat. LOL Whoa, that happened here, but the
> younger is becoming the top cat. :)

Rhonda
September 18th 05, 07:54 PM
I've never used a draped cage. Anything special you have to do?

We thought the small bedroom would help, but he found a way to open the
closet door and hide in there.

Rhonda

Karen wrote:


>
> I seriously would consider a large cage with amenties and draped. He
> sounds soooo traumatized that a small covered space might be calming and
> allow him to feel "safe" while he gets used to her. Just like you would
> do with a feral cat.