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Rebecca Root
September 18th 05, 11:20 PM
Although I am fortunate to not have any cat allergies, I have close
friends who are very allergic, and I'd like to find ways to make it
more comfortable for them to visit in my home. Two things work in our
favor: first, my cats are very shy, so they hide upstairs when guests
are over, and second, I've recently got things under control enough to
guarantee a recently (but not too recently) well-cleaned house when I
have guests. A third thing I've just thought of: my cats are both short
haired and don't shed much.

Nevertheless, my friends come doped on Benadril and even then are
somewhat miserable before the evening is over. (They don't complain,
but the red eyes and congestion are unmistakeable)So I got wondering if
there is something more I could do. For example, is there any kind of
spray product that would temporarily neutralize allergens in the
environment? Or is there some kind of meter that would read levels, so
at least I could tell if things are getting better? As it is, we mostly
get together at their place, but I'd love to have them over more and
know that they were comfortable. Any tips?

5cats
September 19th 05, 01:20 AM
Rebecca Root wrote:

> Although I am fortunate to not have any cat allergies, I have close
> friends who are very allergic, and I'd like to find ways to make it
> more comfortable for them to visit in my home. Two things work in our
> favor: first, my cats are very shy, so they hide upstairs when guests
> are over, and second, I've recently got things under control enough to
> guarantee a recently (but not too recently) well-cleaned house when I
> have guests. A third thing I've just thought of: my cats are both short
> haired and don't shed much.
>
> Nevertheless, my friends come doped on Benadril and even then are
> somewhat miserable before the evening is over. (They don't complain,
> but the red eyes and congestion are unmistakeable)So I got wondering if
> there is something more I could do. For example, is there any kind of
> spray product that would temporarily neutralize allergens in the
> environment? Or is there some kind of meter that would read levels, so
> at least I could tell if things are getting better? As it is, we mostly
> get together at their place, but I'd love to have them over more and
> know that they were comfortable. Any tips?
>

A HEPA air filter should help, though they are kinda spendy ($100+) for
something you'll only use occasionaly.

mlbriggs
September 19th 05, 01:27 AM
On Sun, 18 Sep 2005 19:20:41 -0500, 5cats wrote:

> Rebecca Root wrote:
>
>> Although I am fortunate to not have any cat allergies, I have close
>> friends who are very allergic, and I'd like to find ways to make it more
>> comfortable for them to visit in my home. Two things work in our favor:
>> first, my cats are very shy, so they hide upstairs when guests are over,
>> and second, I've recently got things under control enough to guarantee a
>> recently (but not too recently) well-cleaned house when I have guests. A
>> third thing I've just thought of: my cats are both short haired and
>> don't shed much.
>>
>> Nevertheless, my friends come doped on Benadril and even then are
>> somewhat miserable before the evening is over. (They don't complain, but
>> the red eyes and congestion are unmistakeable)So I got wondering if
>> there is something more I could do. For example, is there any kind of
>> spray product that would temporarily neutralize allergens in the
>> environment? Or is there some kind of meter that would read levels, so
>> at least I could tell if things are getting better? As it is, we mostly
>> get together at their place, but I'd love to have them over more and
>> know that they were comfortable. Any tips?
>>
>>
> A HEPA air filter should help, though they are kinda spendy ($100+) for
> something you'll only use occasionaly.

I have electrostatic air cleaners on my furnace. I also have roomsized
aircleaners in all room. Used all the time helps control dust in the
house. MLB

Joe Canuck
September 19th 05, 01:31 AM
Rebecca Root wrote:

> Although I am fortunate to not have any cat allergies, I have close
> friends who are very allergic, and I'd like to find ways to make it more
> comfortable for them to visit in my home. Two things work in our favor:
> first, my cats are very shy, so they hide upstairs when guests are over,
> and second, I've recently got things under control enough to guarantee a
> recently (but not too recently) well-cleaned house when I have guests. A
> third thing I've just thought of: my cats are both short haired and
> don't shed much.
>
> Nevertheless, my friends come doped on Benadril and even then are
> somewhat miserable before the evening is over. (They don't complain, but
> the red eyes and congestion are unmistakeable)So I got wondering if
> there is something more I could do. For example, is there any kind of
> spray product that would temporarily neutralize allergens in the
> environment? Or is there some kind of meter that would read levels, so
> at least I could tell if things are getting better? As it is, we mostly
> get together at their place, but I'd love to have them over more and
> know that they were comfortable. Any tips?
>

HEPA air filters.
Vacuuming and cleaning on a regular basis, every coupla days.
Claritin.

Phil P.
September 19th 05, 01:37 AM
"Rebecca Root" > wrote in message
news:2005091816201416807%[email protected]
> Although I am fortunate to not have any cat allergies, I have close
> friends who are very allergic, and I'd like to find ways to make it
> more comfortable for them to visit in my home. Two things work in our
> favor: first, my cats are very shy, so they hide upstairs when guests
> are over, and second, I've recently got things under control enough to
> guarantee a recently (but not too recently) well-cleaned house when I
> have guests. A third thing I've just thought of: my cats are both short
> haired and don't shed much.


Its not the cat's fur that some people are allergic to, its the protein, Fel
d1 that's secreted from the cat's sebaceous and salivary glands. When Fel
d1 dries it becomes airborne and also attaches to almost every surface in
the home. That's why your friends become symptomatic even though your cats
are nowhere near them.


>
> Nevertheless, my friends come doped on Benadril and even then are
> somewhat miserable before the evening is over. (They don't complain,
> but the red eyes and congestion are unmistakeable)So I got wondering if
> there is something more I could do. For example, is there any kind of
> spray product that would temporarily neutralize allergens in the
> environment? Or is there some kind of meter that would read levels, so
> at least I could tell if things are getting better? As it is, we mostly
> get together at their place, but I'd love to have them over more and
> know that they were comfortable. Any tips?

I used to think wiping the cat down with Allerpet helped reduce the amount
of Fel d1 in the environment- but it really doesn't. Some cats secrete more
Fel d1 than others. So, if your cat happens by chance to be one of the cats
that secrete very little Fel d1, Allerpet would seem to work- although you'd
probably get the same results from wiping the cat down every day with
spring water without putting all those chemicals on your cats.

About the only things you can do are vacuum your home- including furniture-
extra-well when you know your allergic friends are coming over and run a
couple of high-volume HEPA air filters that clean the entire room air at
least 6 times an hour. You could also hand out N95 particulate surgical
masks at the door. ;-)

Good luck,

Phil

Topaz
September 19th 05, 01:41 AM
"5cats" > wrote in message
...
> Rebecca Root wrote:
>
> > Although I am fortunate to not have any cat allergies, I have close
> > friends who are very allergic, and I'd like to find ways to make it
> > more comfortable for them to visit in my home. Two things work in our
> > favor: first, my cats are very shy, so they hide upstairs when guests
> > are over, and second, I've recently got things under control enough to
> > guarantee a recently (but not too recently) well-cleaned house when I
> > have guests. A third thing I've just thought of: my cats are both short
> > haired and don't shed much.
> >
> > Nevertheless, my friends come doped on Benadril and even then are
> > somewhat miserable before the evening is over. (They don't complain,
> > but the red eyes and congestion are unmistakeable)So I got wondering if
> > there is something more I could do. For example, is there any kind of
> > spray product that would temporarily neutralize allergens in the
> > environment? Or is there some kind of meter that would read levels, so
> > at least I could tell if things are getting better? As it is, we mostly
> > get together at their place, but I'd love to have them over more and
> > know that they were comfortable. Any tips?
> >
>
> A HEPA air filter should help, though they are kinda spendy ($100+) for
> something you'll only use occasionaly.
>

Use occasionally? I use mine all the time. They are the only air filters
that
work on the molecular level. The filters NOT to use are the ones that
generate ozone as they actually damage the lungs--not something an allergic
person (or anyone) needs. (The "Ionic Breeze" is one of the latter.)

Ditto what Joe said about Claritin, it has proven to work much better
than Benedryl without the drowsiness.

Rebecca Root
September 19th 05, 04:31 AM
On 2005-09-18 18:41:31 -0600, "Topaz" > said:

>>
>> A HEPA air filter should help, though they are kinda spendy ($100+) for
>> something you'll only use occasionaly.
>>
>
> Use occasionally? I use mine all the time. They are the only air filters
> that
> work on the molecular level. The filters NOT to use are the ones that
> generate ozone as they actually damage the lungs--not something an allergic
> person (or anyone) needs. (The "Ionic Breeze" is one of the latter.)
>
> Ditto what Joe said about Claritin, it has proven to work much better
> than Benedryl without the drowsiness.

Thanks for all the tips, folks. A couple of follow-up questions:

- Are HEPA air filters a free-standing device or do you put them on a
furnace? My heat is baseboard hot water, not forced air, so I'd need a
separate, free standing device as there are no air ducts in the house.

- Is Claritin an over the counter thing? I could have it on hand, if so,

- Regarding Phil's comments about the allergen being in the saliva:
that makes me think that what I most need to add to my routine is
wiping down all the hard surfaces with a damp cloth. I guess I
knew the problem was in the saliva, but always worried most about the
fur that got licked and shed, so I focussed on getting rid of fur by
vacuuming. Since my cats walk on end tables, chair arms and just about
everything else, those area should probably receive cleaning just
before guests arrive.

Topaz
September 19th 05, 04:34 AM
"Rebecca Root" > wrote

> Thanks for all the tips, folks. A couple of follow-up questions:
>
> - Are HEPA air filters a free-standing device or do you put them on a
> furnace?

There may be some to use with furnaces but all the ones I have seen
are free standing, either desk or floor models. They work very well.
The cost of the unit--100+ for larger ones--is not the main thing--
the cost of the FILTERS is. A replacement filter can cost $40-50,
and you should replace most every 90 days. (That is the HEPA
part, there is also a foam filter that needs to be cleaned and/or
replaced that is much cheaper.)

?My heat is baseboard hot water, not forced air, so I'd need a
> separate, free standing device as there are no air ducts in the house.

Go to Lowes or Walmart and check out what they have. I can vouch
for these filters effectiveness. Also the "white noise" they make in the
bedroom makes falling asleep/shutting out the noises of the house
easier. They are great. Spend the $80-$100 on a big floor model
for your bedroom and living room, and you will be set.

>
> - Is Claritin an over the counter thing? I could have it on hand, if so,

It is. Get the generic loratidine and it will cost about 1/4 the price.
OTC 10 mg Claritin is $1 a pill, but Walmart and Kroger and
many drug chains have loratidine 10 mgs (same exact drug) for
about .25 a pill. I paid $7.00 for 30 at Walmart, as opposed to
the $30 for 30 Claritin would cost. The children's dose is 5 mgs.
It is a wonder drug. NO sleepiness, no drying out of nose and
throat, just great allergy relief.
>
> - Regarding Phil's comments about the allergen being in the saliva:
> that makes me think that what I most need to add to my routine is
> wiping down all the hard surfaces with a damp cloth. I guess I
> knew the problem was in the saliva, but always worried most about the
> fur that got licked and shed, so I focussed on getting rid of fur by
> vacuuming. Since my cats walk on end tables, chair arms and just about
> everything else, those area should probably receive cleaning just
> before guests arrive.
>
A HEPA in the living room and vacuuming should be just fine.

5cats
September 19th 05, 04:40 AM
Rebecca Root wrote:

> On 2005-09-18 18:41:31 -0600, "Topaz" > said:
>
>>>
>>> A HEPA air filter should help, though they are kinda spendy ($100+)
>>> for something you'll only use occasionaly.
>>>
>>
>> Use occasionally? I use mine all the time. They are the only air
>> filters that
>> work on the molecular level. The filters NOT to use are the ones that
>> generate ozone as they actually damage the lungs--not something an
>> allergic person (or anyone) needs. (The "Ionic Breeze" is one of the
>> latter.)
>>
>> Ditto what Joe said about Claritin, it has proven to work much better
>> than Benedryl without the drowsiness.
>
> Thanks for all the tips, folks. A couple of follow-up questions:
>
> - Are HEPA air filters a free-standing device or do you put them on a
> furnace? My heat is baseboard hot water, not forced air, so I'd need a
> separate, free standing device as there are no air ducts in the house.

It's a free-standing unit. Nearly everyplace that sells appliances should
carry them.


> - Is Claritin an over the counter thing? I could have it on hand, if
> so,
>

Yes, it's OTC.

> - Regarding Phil's comments about the allergen being in the saliva:
> that makes me think that what I most need to add to my routine is
> wiping down all the hard surfaces with a damp cloth. I guess I
> knew the problem was in the saliva, but always worried most about the
> fur that got licked and shed, so I focussed on getting rid of fur by
> vacuuming. Since my cats walk on end tables, chair arms and just about
> everything else, those area should probably receive cleaning just
> before guests arrive.

One more thought, there are high grade vacuum cleaner bags (HEPA, I
think) that don't allow any of the dust back into the air.

You can google on HEPA and find a ton of info, I've forgotten all the
specs on exactly what it means.

Phil P.
September 19th 05, 05:08 AM
"Rebecca Root" > wrote in message
news:2005091821315516807%[email protected]

> Thanks for all the tips, folks. A couple of follow-up questions:
>
> - Are HEPA air filters a free-standing device or do you put them on a
> furnace? My heat is baseboard hot water, not forced air, so I'd need a
> separate, free standing device as there are no air ducts in the house.

I was referring to free-standing units. Here's an Amazon link of the
different types and styles:

http://tinyurl.com/d8tgk

http://www.comforthouse.com/comfort/readglascasb.html

http://www.comforthouse.com/comfort/honquietcarh.html

You want a model that will clean all the room air at least 6x an hour. Or,
if they're too big, a couple of smaller units. The filters are usually
labeled for the size of the room they're designed for. If your vacuum
cleaner doesn't have a HEPA filter, run the filters at top speed while
you're vacuuming.

You might also want to think about getting a Dyson Vacuum cleaner. They all
have HEPA filters and the "Animal" model is designed for homes with pets. I
have the DC 14 "All Floors" which has the same power and features as the
Animal. The Animal costs about $120 but comes with a Mini Turbine head for
furniture- but the standard furniture attachment that comes with the DC 14
is easier to use. The DC 14 has a telescoping handle that's slides inside a
hose for reaching the ceiling and walls. I think Dyson is about the best
vacuum cleaner there is.

http://www.dyson.com/homepage.asp




>
> - Is Claritin an over the counter thing? I could have it on hand, if so,

OTC


>
> - Regarding Phil's comments about the allergen being in the saliva:
> that makes me think that what I most need to add to my routine is
> wiping down all the hard surfaces with a damp cloth. I guess I
> knew the problem was in the saliva, but always worried most about the
> fur that got licked and shed, so I focussed on getting rid of fur by
> vacuuming. Since my cats walk on end tables, chair arms and just about
> everything else, those area should probably receive cleaning just
> before guests arrive.

Although some Fel d1 is secreted in the saliva, much more is secreted by the
sebaceous glands. Wiping down the furniture with a damp rag and rinsing it
frequently is definitely a good idea.

hth,

Phil

-L.
September 19th 05, 06:08 AM
Rebecca Root wrote:
>
> - Are HEPA air filters a free-standing device or do you put them on a
> furnace? My heat is baseboard hot water, not forced air, so I'd need a
> separate, free standing device as there are no air ducts in the house.

HEPA just stands for High Efficiency Particulate Air (filter). What
that means is it filters out most particles other filters miss because
the "holes" in the filter are so small. They are the kind of filters
used in laminar air flow hoods in labortatories for keeping samples
sterile while working with them. HEPA filters come in all
configurations from 6X6 inches to 6X6 ft or larger. For home use,
there are those made suitable for use with some furnaces (check your
furnace manual), others are made to fit in free-standing devices such
as the Honeywell brand air purifiers. They are expensive. An
alternative is to buy higher-quality filters for your furnace through a
supply house that markets products for asthmatics. http://www.
allergybuyersclub.com carries a few different ones, for example.

>
> - Is Claritin an over the counter thing? I could have it on hand, if so,

Claritin is like any other drug - it works for some people and not for
others (my brother swears by it, it does diddly-squat for my DH, for
example). Another drug people seem to like is Singulair, but it is
Rx only. Like most drugs, finding one that helps is trial and error.


>
> - Regarding Phil's comments about the allergen being in the saliva:
> that makes me think that what I most need to add to my routine is
> wiping down all the hard surfaces with a damp cloth. I guess I
> knew the problem was in the saliva, but always worried most about the
> fur that got licked and shed, so I focussed on getting rid of fur by
> vacuuming.

My husband is allergic to the fur, itself. Not everyone has saliva
allergies, but most people do.

Grooming is another major key in keeping reactions to a minimum.
Brushing and wiping down the cats every-other day or so helps reduce
DH's reactivity. The cleaner you can be, the more it helps, regardless
of the source of the allergen.

-L.

Phil P.
September 19th 05, 09:14 AM
"Nomen Nescio" ]> wrote in message
...
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>
> From: "Phil P." >
>
> >You might also want to think about getting a Dyson Vacuum cleaner. They
all
> >have HEPA filters and the "Animal" model is designed for homes with pets.
I
> >have the DC 14 "All Floors" which has the same power and features as the
> >Animal.
>
> I'll second that.
> I got a Dyson DC 14 last fall. I vacuumed with our old,
> and somewhat ailing, bag vac and then again with the
> new DC 14. I had to empty the bin 4 times before I
> finished. The thing pulled about 3 lbs of dead skin and
> cat dander out of the furniture and carpet (at least that's
> what I'm guessing that it was). As well as handfulls of
> assorted fibers and cat hair, I put some of it on a slide
> and looked at it under a microscope and discovered
> a few interesting life forms.
> My wife walked in the house a few hours later and
> immediately said "You got our new vacuum, today".
> "Yea, How did you know?"
> "The air in here seems cleaner....not as thick".



That's because of the HEPA exhaust filter. The rooms always smell fresher
after vacuuming with the Dyson.



>
> >The Animal costs about $120 but comes with a Mini Turbine head for
> >furniture-
>
> Slight correction....I think Phil meant $120 _more_.


Yup. That's what I meant. The additional $120 is just for the mini turbo
furniture attachment that you can buy separately for the DC for about $60-
which is a waste, low-reach attachment, and a package of carpet cleaner. I
bought the low reach attachment- that I think should come with unit.
Actually I wanted the DC14 Low Reach but it was back-ordered.

>
> The Dysons aren't cheap, but they're well worth the money.
> Especially if there will be people, or pets, in the house with
> allergy problems.

Absolutely. The thing's indestructible. Even with a full canister it still
has the same suction- and its a breeze to empty.

We probably sound like a couple of housewives.LOL!


Btw, how's TC? Any new measurements?

Phil

chas
September 19th 05, 04:28 PM
I suggest your allergic friends have a dose of anti histimines before they
visit.

I'm very allergic and take them daily. They really do help.

chas

Phil P.
September 20th 05, 09:40 AM
"Nomen Nescio" ]> wrote in message
...
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>
> From: "Phil P." >

> >We probably sound like a couple of housewives.LOL!
>
> If we begin swapping cake recipes, I'll start getting concerned. :)


Yeah, then we'd have to post over in rpca. LOL



I can even use it in front of friends without
> feeling like they're visualizing me wearing a housedress
> and an apron.


Dyson even sounds better. Hoover sucks. (ba domp a domp)


>
> >Btw, how's TC? Any new measurements?
>
> He seems to be doing great. No sign of any cardiac related
> problems.

That's great!


Actually, I get a bit concerned that he has too much
> energy. TK likes to run around like a wildcat for 15 minutes at
> a time. Jumping my leg and then running off to get me to chase
> him. Vaulting the furniture, up and down the stairs, rolling around
> attacking my feet to get me to "rough him up" a bit. But after his
> psychokitty episodes, he's breathing hard (as you would expect)
> but there's no sign of shortness of breath. The vet at Tufts said
> that any heart problem will tend to self regulate his activity.


That's true in most but not all cases. Some HCM cats don't develop exercise
intolerance or dyspnea until later in the disease. So, you've got to keep
up the vigilance even though he's asymptomatic.


So
> based on that, I'd say things are functioning quite well. I do wish
> he'd slow it down a little, though.
> I put a stethoscope on him about once a week to see if I can
> hear the murmur returning. I haven't heard anything abnormal
> for months. I don't know enough to make any diagnosis from
> listening, but I think my ear is good enough to say "sounds OK"
> or "that's not right".
> Considering the fact that a few months ago I didn't think he would
> be around this long, I'm feeling quite encouraged.
> He's due for another echo next month. I'm hopeful that the numbers
> will look a little better, as the diminished (nearly nonexistent)
> murmur would indicate.
> But right now, he seems totally asymptomatic.


That's great! Is he still on diltiazem? Since you caught it early,
hopefully the diltiazem has reversed some or all of his myocardial
hypertrophy. Let me know the new echo numbers when you get them, ok?




> He's even losing a little weight. Slowly....but it is going down at
> a rate of about 10 - 15 grams a week. Our regular vet had suggested
> the Hills m/d twice a day. But he'd munch out and be nipping
> my ankles for more within an hour. Now I'm giving him 2 cans
> of FF, usually grilled chicken, and a small amount of the m/d.
> He nibbles at the FF throughout the day and generally leaves
> my ankles alone. I think he just gets nervous when there's no
> food in the dish.


I think the FF is reducing the efficacy of the m/d. That's why he's only
losing 2 oz/mo. You might be better off giving him a little extra m/d as
treats rather than FF. How much does he weigh and how much m/d are you
feeding him?




>
> Again, Thanks for all your help, advice, expertise, and encouragement.


You're welcome. I just wish I could have been more helpful.

Best of luck.

Phil

Phil P.
September 21st 05, 12:09 PM
"Nomen Nescio" ]> wrote in message
...
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>
> From: "Phil P." >
>
> >> If we begin swapping cake recipes, I'll start getting concerned. :)
> >
> >Yeah, then we'd have to post over in rpca. LOL
>
> Ooooooh Nooooo. Don't get me started talking about rpca.


I know whatcha mean. Before posting a message to rpca, I feel like I have
to wash my hands in holy water before typing the message. LOL!



>
> >> But right now, he seems totally asymptomatic.
> >
> >
> >That's great! Is he still on diltiazem?
>
> He's still getting the 30 mg of the diltiazem ER once a day.
> I had assumed that he would have to be on this for life.
> Do you know of any cases where cats have had a reversal
> of HCM and been taken off the diltiazem without it beginning
> to progress again?


Diltiazem doesn't 'cure' HCM. It reverses myocardial hypertrophy and left
atrial size in some- not all HCM cats. I think long-term diltiazem therapy
is necessary to keep hypertrophy in check. Diltiazem has so many other
benefits- such as reducing the risk of aortic thrombosis and just generally
improving the heart's overall performance that I wouldn't even think about
discontinuing therapy unless some rare adverse effect developed.


>
> >>Let me know the new echo numbers when you get them, ok?
>
> Thanks. I do appreciate it.
> And you should know me well enough, by now, to know that
> I'll be buggin' you to look at the new numbers whether you
> want to or not. :)


Alright alright! Stop twisting my arm- I can't take anymore - I'll look at
the numbers when you get them. ;->




>
> >I think the FF is reducing the efficacy of the m/d. That's why he's only
> >losing 2 oz/mo. You might be better off giving him a little extra m/d as
> >treats rather than FF. How much does he weigh and how much m/d are you
> >feeding him?
>
> You're probably right, but TK gets VERY stressed out when
> there's no food in his dish. If I give him half his daily ration
> of m/d (45 gms/day), he'll eat it all and them get upset the
> next time he checks the dish and it's empty. If I give him a
> can of FF, he'll eat a couple of bites and then walk away happy.
> As long as the next time he checks his dish, there's still
> food in it, he's content....even if he doesn't eat anything
> when he checks it.


After he eats half his daily ration, put some food in the bowl that he
doesn't like, and replace it with his regular food at feeding time. That's
also how you stop your cats from eating each others' food- find a food that
only each cat likes.




> He's a very odd cat.

Naaa, he just has a strong character- wants everything his way and doesn't
want anyone to give him any **** about it! You've got to read the Silent
Miaow. Its a manual for cats written by a cat and translated from the
feline by Paul Gallico. It proves that cats know exactly what they're doing
when they take over our lives. In fact the first chapter is titled "The
Takeover". Its true- I have a picture of the author while he was actually
typing the manual:
http://www.maxshouse.com/origin_domestication+biology/Silent_Miaow-01.jpg


Actually, I'm happy
> that he's starting to eat canned food.


Sure. Canned food if especially better for a male cat.


He wouldn't touch
> anything but dry for the first year he was here (and he gained
> 4 lbs during that time).
> Right now he's between 13 1/4 and 13 1/2 lbs. Our regular vet
> says he should be about 12 lbs. The cardiologist at Tufts says
> around 11 lbs. TK was about 14 1/4 - 14 1/2 last Spring, so we
> are making progress.
> His normal meals, now, are 2 cans of FF (1 every 12 hrs), and
> 10 - 20 gms of the m/d throughout the day as he demands.


If you mean 4 cans of FF + 20 gms a day - you're feeding him too much. An
overweight cat has a daily energy requirement of about 40 kcals/kg or about
18 kcals/lb. At 13.5# TK's DER is about 245 kcal. FF averages about 80
kcal/can- that's 320 kcal right there. 20 gms of m/d = another 80 kcals.




>
> >> Again, Thanks for all your help, advice, expertise, and encouragement.
> >
> >You're welcome. I just wish I could have been more helpful.
>
> Outside of waving a magic wand to cure his HCM, or maybe
> coming with us for his echo, I don't see how you could be
> more helpful. We REALLY appreciate all you've done to help
> us and TK.

I'm glad to help- but I always feel like I missed something.

Best of luck,

Phil

Phil P.
September 22nd 05, 11:03 PM
"Nomen Nescio" ]> wrote in message
...
> -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
>
> From: "Phil P." >
>
> >I know whatcha mean. Before posting a message to rpca, I feel like I
have
> >to wash my hands in holy water before typing the message. LOL!
>
> Aha! So that's how one avoids the eternal damnation of
> the rpca killfile.

Or worse- the barrage of recipes. I guess they rather wallow in their
ignorance than get their feathers ruffled a little.


>
> >After he eats half his daily ration, put some food in the bowl that he
> >doesn't like, and replace it with his regular food at feeding time.
That's
> >also how you stop your cats from eating each others' food- find a food
that
> >only each cat likes.
>
> I'm having one of those "Now why the hell didn't I
> think of that" moments, right now.


Yeah, just keep about a tablespoon in the dish. Cover and refrigerate the
can. One can should last 2 days.



>
> >If you mean 4 cans of FF + 20 gms a day - you're feeding him too much.
>
> Just 2 cans of the FF per day.


That's better. I misunderstood you.


>
> >An
> >overweight cat has a daily energy requirement of about 40 kcals/kg or
about
> >18 kcals/lb. At 13.5# TK's DER is about 245 kcal. FF averages about 80
> >kcal/can- that's 320 kcal right there. 20 gms of m/d = another 80 kcals.
>
> (2 cans @ 80 kcal/can) = 160 kcal
> +
> (10 - 20 gms m/d) = 40 - 80 kcal
>
> So it's about 200 - 240 kcal/day
> add in the occasional handout from dinner (piece of steak,
> shrimp, or tonight.....a taste of halibut) and I can see why
> his weight is dropping so slowly.
> I think we need to lose another 20 - 40 kcal in there, somewhere.


About 185 kcal a day should be just about right. 75% of his DER.


>
> >I'm glad to help- but I always feel like I missed something.
>
> I know what you mean.
> I think that's the downside of being someone who actually
> cares about things.

It can be a real PITA sometimes.


> Thanks again.


Forget about it.;-)

Phil