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meee
September 21st 05, 11:18 AM
Hi, this is me again, jasmine is started to look decidedly pregnant; before
anyone flames me for not desexing my cat, i've already been through this
with phil & others....if you still feel morally outraged be my guest. Anyway
the reality is, she's bin knocked up, her belly is growing, her teats are
visible, she's hanging around me meowing and looking at me as if it's all my
fault ( I know, I know, it is, but anyway). She's inspecting cupboards,
lying around a lot, and behaving in a very grumpy, I'm miserable and
everyone else is gonna know it kinda way. How do I know when she's going to
drop them? and how soon after she has had the kittens can we have her
desexed? I'm probably going to keep one of the kittens ( my hubby says no,
but i know when they're born *he'll* be picking which one!!!) I'm thinking
of keeping a boy and having him neutered too-boys are cheaper I believe.

John Doe
September 21st 05, 12:40 PM
"meee" <efamaaea bigpond.net.au> wrote:

> Hi, this is me again, jasmine is started to look decidedly
> pregnant; before anyone flames me for not desexing my cat,

You mean not having it spayed and letting it outside.


>
>
>
>
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> From: "meee" <efamaaea bigpond.net.au>
> Newsgroups: alt.cats,rec.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.anecdotes,rec .pets.cats.health+behav
> Subject: Pregnant jasmine
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Abe
September 21st 05, 01:18 PM
>> Hi, this is me again, jasmine is started to look decidedly
>> pregnant; before anyone flames me for not desexing my cat,
>You mean not having it spayed and letting it outside.
That was helpful-NOT. How about answering the question, which was how
to tell when the cat will be having her kittens? Or would you rather
just make idle and obvious comments that help no one?

whayface
September 21st 05, 01:59 PM
On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 10:18:34 GMT, "meee" > wrote:

>Hi, this is me again, jasmine is started to look decidedly pregnant; before
>anyone flames me for not desexing my cat, i've already been through this
>with phil & others....

Congrats on the future birth of you grand-furbabies.

As for "desexing" Jasmine - things hapen. As long as you find then a good home and the
babies are well taken care of.



http://members.aol.com/larrystark/

http://members.aol.com/larrystark/strays.htm

223rem
September 21st 05, 02:19 PM
John Doe wrote:
> "meee" <efamaaea bigpond.net.au> wrote:
>
>
>>Hi, this is me again, jasmine is started to look decidedly
>>pregnant; before anyone flames me for not desexing my cat,
>
>
> You mean not having it spayed and letting it outside.
>

Yes, castrate, declaw, and never allow them to enjoy
fresh air and sunshine.
Your cats must be very happy.

Wendy
September 21st 05, 02:40 PM
"meee" > wrote in message
...
> Hi, this is me again, jasmine is started to look decidedly pregnant;
> before
> anyone flames me for not desexing my cat, i've already been through this
> with phil & others....if you still feel morally outraged be my guest.
> Anyway
> the reality is, she's bin knocked up, her belly is growing, her teats are
> visible, she's hanging around me meowing and looking at me as if it's all
> my
> fault ( I know, I know, it is, but anyway). She's inspecting cupboards,
> lying around a lot, and behaving in a very grumpy, I'm miserable and
> everyone else is gonna know it kinda way. How do I know when she's going
> to
> drop them? and how soon after she has had the kittens can we have her
> desexed? I'm probably going to keep one of the kittens ( my hubby says no,
> but i know when they're born *he'll* be picking which one!!!) I'm thinking
> of keeping a boy and having him neutered too-boys are cheaper I believe.
>
>

If you have no idea when the cat got pregnant then a vet will have to
examine her to give you any kind of accurate idea when she will be due. I
hope you're keeping her inside until after she has the kittens and is
spayed. You really don't want her having the kittens outside somewhere.

You can have her spayed once the kittens are weaned. Here again the vet will
best be able to advise you.

If the cost difference between neutering a male and spaying a female is an
issue, are you sure you can afford to keep any of the kittens?

W

rpl
September 21st 05, 03:49 PM
223rem wrote:
> John Doe wrote:
>
>> "meee" <efamaaea bigpond.net.au> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Hi, this is me again, jasmine is started to look decidedly
>>> pregnant; before anyone flames me for not desexing my cat,
>>
>>
>>
>> You mean not having it spayed and letting it outside.
>>
>
> Yes, castrate, declaw, and never allow them to enjoy
> fresh air and sunshine.
> Your cats must be very happy.

Declawing is for the convenience of a poor owner; neutering is for the
good of society in general (has nothing to do with ownership).

Yes there's certainly a balance point where cats kept as pets plus feral
cats a community can support equals the amount of cats. If your
community has reached that and there's no cats in shelters,
congratulations and do tell.

Pat

mlbriggs
September 21st 05, 06:55 PM
On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 10:18:34 +0000, meee wrote:

> Hi, this is me again, jasmine is started to look decidedly pregnant;
> before anyone flames me for not desexing my cat, i've already been through
> this with phil & others....if you still feel morally outraged be my guest.
> Anyway the reality is, she's bin knocked up, her belly is growing, her
> teats are visible, she's hanging around me meowing and looking at me as if
> it's all my fault ( I know, I know, it is, but anyway). She's inspecting
> cupboards, lying around a lot, and behaving in a very grumpy, I'm
> miserable and everyone else is gonna know it kinda way. How do I know when
> she's going to drop them? and how soon after she has had the kittens can
> we have her desexed? I'm probably going to keep one of the kittens ( my
> hubby says no, but i know when they're born *he'll* be picking which
> one!!!) I'm thinking of keeping a boy and having him neutered too-boys are
> cheaper I believe.


IMHO you will probably have more enjoyment than you ever believed.
Prepare two or three boxes for hidey-holes and let her choose where she
wants to have the babies. You will have trouble parting with any of them.
Follow Ted's advice on subsequent spaying. Best of luck. MLB

MarAzul
September 23rd 05, 04:18 AM
"meee" > wrote in message
...
> Hi, this is me again, jasmine is started to look decidedly pregnant;
> before
> anyone flames me for not desexing my cat, i've already been through this
> with phil & others....if you still feel morally outraged be my guest.
> Anyway
> the reality is, she's bin knocked up, her belly is growing, her teats are
> visible, she's hanging around me meowing and looking at me as if it's all
> my
> fault ( I know, I know, it is, but anyway). She's inspecting cupboards,
> lying around a lot, and behaving in a very grumpy, I'm miserable and
> everyone else is gonna know it kinda way. How do I know when she's going
> to
> drop them? and how soon after she has had the kittens can we have her
> desexed? I'm probably going to keep one of the kittens ( my hubby says no,
> but i know when they're born *he'll* be picking which one!!!) I'm thinking
> of keeping a boy and having him neutered too-boys are cheaper I believe.
>
>


A cat's gestation period is approximatly 60 days. As one of the other
posters said, if you don't know when she concieved, you'll need to take her
to the vet and they can look her over. An ultrasound evaluation can be
reliably done at 21 days and an x-ray can be safely taken after 45 days.
Again, the vet will have to use their best judgement as to how far along she
is.

--
Mar
---------
VTIT

meee
September 23rd 05, 10:03 AM
mlbriggs > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 10:18:34 +0000, meee wrote:
>
> > Hi, this is me again, jasmine is started to look decidedly pregnant;
> > before anyone flames me for not desexing my cat, i've already been
through
> > this with phil & others....if you still feel morally outraged be my
guest.
> > Anyway the reality is, she's bin knocked up, her belly is growing, her
> > teats are visible, she's hanging around me meowing and looking at me as
if
> > it's all my fault ( I know, I know, it is, but anyway). She's inspecting
> > cupboards, lying around a lot, and behaving in a very grumpy, I'm
> > miserable and everyone else is gonna know it kinda way. How do I know
when
> > she's going to drop them? and how soon after she has had the kittens can
> > we have her desexed? I'm probably going to keep one of the kittens ( my
> > hubby says no, but i know when they're born *he'll* be picking which
> > one!!!) I'm thinking of keeping a boy and having him neutered too-boys
are
> > cheaper I believe.
>
>
> IMHO you will probably have more enjoyment than you ever believed.
> Prepare two or three boxes for hidey-holes and let her choose where she
> wants to have the babies. You will have trouble parting with any of them.
> Follow Ted's advice on subsequent spaying. Best of luck. MLB

As you said...I'm going to have a lot of fun!! This is our first litter of
kittens so I can't wait...I would like to (eventually) breed Siamese and
Bombays, so hopefully I will learn a bit, and convince hubby how much fun
it would be!!! i will have a lot of trouble letting them go, especially if
they're as adorable as she is. I was thinking of keeping one, but I think
i'll let them go, as I'v found out there's a siamese breeder 1 hour from
here...so I'm looking at their photos on the net and drooling. But I'm going
to have trouble with hubby I think....every time his sister had kittens,
we'd end up with one!!! Maybe he won't be so hard to convince on the
breeding scheme after all...

meee
September 23rd 05, 11:07 AM
Wendy > wrote in message
...
>
> "meee" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Hi, this is me again, jasmine is started to look decidedly pregnant;
> > before
> > anyone flames me for not desexing my cat, i've already been through this
> > with phil & others....if you still feel morally outraged be my guest.
> > Anyway
> > the reality is, she's bin knocked up, her belly is growing, her teats
are
> > visible, she's hanging around me meowing and looking at me as if it's
all
> > my
> > fault ( I know, I know, it is, but anyway). She's inspecting cupboards,
> > lying around a lot, and behaving in a very grumpy, I'm miserable and
> > everyone else is gonna know it kinda way. How do I know when she's going
> > to
> > drop them? and how soon after she has had the kittens can we have her
> > desexed? I'm probably going to keep one of the kittens ( my hubby says
no,
> > but i know when they're born *he'll* be picking which one!!!) I'm
thinking
> > of keeping a boy and having him neutered too-boys are cheaper I believe.
> >
> >
>
> If you have no idea when the cat got pregnant then a vet will have to
> examine her to give you any kind of accurate idea when she will be due. I
> hope you're keeping her inside until after she has the kittens and is
> spayed. You really don't want her having the kittens outside somewhere.
>
> You can have her spayed once the kittens are weaned. Here again the vet
will
> best be able to advise you.
>
> If the cost difference between neutering a male and spaying a female is an
> issue, are you sure you can afford to keep any of the kittens?
>
> W
>
>
I had a financial problem desexing Jas because shortly after she walked into
our lives we moved house from the country to the city, to access education
and jobs not available in the country, so we don't have financial
difficulties as much. Now both my husband and I can get jobs, as I can for
the first time access childcare for my kiddies, and our finances will
stretch once more to proper vet care. Unfortunately our finance problem
coincided with Jasmine's arrival. Vets in the city are also cheaper than
country vets- supply & demand. Don't worry, I wouldn't consider getting an
animal unless I could care for it. Jas was not a 'planned baby', but welcome
nonetheless. Thanks for your concern, and I hope my answer satisfied you. I
am considering not keeping any kittens...though I'll have to hope me & hubby
can resist the 'cute' impulse. It's ahrd to say, because sometimes, you just
bond with an animal, and there's not much you can do. If all goes as planned
I'll find good homes for them.

Wendy
September 23rd 05, 02:23 PM
"meee" > wrote in message
...
>
> Wendy > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "meee" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> > Hi, this is me again, jasmine is started to look decidedly pregnant;
>> > before
>> > anyone flames me for not desexing my cat, i've already been through
>> > this
>> > with phil & others....if you still feel morally outraged be my guest.
>> > Anyway
>> > the reality is, she's bin knocked up, her belly is growing, her teats
> are
>> > visible, she's hanging around me meowing and looking at me as if it's
> all
>> > my
>> > fault ( I know, I know, it is, but anyway). She's inspecting cupboards,
>> > lying around a lot, and behaving in a very grumpy, I'm miserable and
>> > everyone else is gonna know it kinda way. How do I know when she's
>> > going
>> > to
>> > drop them? and how soon after she has had the kittens can we have her
>> > desexed? I'm probably going to keep one of the kittens ( my hubby says
> no,
>> > but i know when they're born *he'll* be picking which one!!!) I'm
> thinking
>> > of keeping a boy and having him neutered too-boys are cheaper I
>> > believe.
>> >
>> >
>>
>> If you have no idea when the cat got pregnant then a vet will have to
>> examine her to give you any kind of accurate idea when she will be due. I
>> hope you're keeping her inside until after she has the kittens and is
>> spayed. You really don't want her having the kittens outside somewhere.
>>
>> You can have her spayed once the kittens are weaned. Here again the vet
> will
>> best be able to advise you.
>>
>> If the cost difference between neutering a male and spaying a female is
>> an
>> issue, are you sure you can afford to keep any of the kittens?
>>
>> W
>>
>>
> I had a financial problem desexing Jas because shortly after she walked
> into
> our lives we moved house from the country to the city, to access education
> and jobs not available in the country, so we don't have financial
> difficulties as much. Now both my husband and I can get jobs, as I can for
> the first time access childcare for my kiddies, and our finances will
> stretch once more to proper vet care. Unfortunately our finance problem
> coincided with Jasmine's arrival. Vets in the city are also cheaper than
> country vets- supply & demand. Don't worry, I wouldn't consider getting an
> animal unless I could care for it. Jas was not a 'planned baby', but
> welcome
> nonetheless. Thanks for your concern, and I hope my answer satisfied you.
> I
> am considering not keeping any kittens...though I'll have to hope me &
> hubby
> can resist the 'cute' impulse. It's ahrd to say, because sometimes, you
> just
> bond with an animal, and there's not much you can do. If all goes as
> planned
> I'll find good homes for them.
>
>

If you are really into little kittens you could always volunteer with a
local rescue group to foster pregnant moms and kittens.

Topaz
September 23rd 05, 06:55 PM
"Wendy" > wrote in message
...
>
> "meee" > wrote in message
> ...


> If you are really into little kittens you could always volunteer with a
> local rescue group to foster pregnant moms and kittens.
>

What a great idea! That way "meee" would not be adding cats to a world
already overpopulated with cats to the point that hundreds of thousands
of cats and kittens are executed in this country alone every week!

You are so smart.

Calvin Rice
September 24th 05, 02:25 AM
meee wrote:
> As you said...I'm going to have a lot of fun!! This is our first litter of
> kittens so I can't wait.. ...

There's nothing more fun than kittens, in my opinion, but you should
be prepared for a lot of work. A big commitment is needed to care
for even one kitten, and a bigger one for a litter. It's vitally
important to be extremely careful in every move you make, and
look at everything in the house as a possible kitten hazard. They
are especially prone, for example, to falling off of things that they
climb onto, and they can be suddenly underfoot when you could have
sworn they were still in another room.

Kittens are easy to train for a litter box, but they also like to make
a
bathroom out of loose rags or cloth things like laundry in a corner or
a sheet on the floor. They're easy to clean up after, but some work
definitely will be required after they start to move around on their
own,
until they are setled into a hygenic routine. They will be messy
eaters when you first start weaning them too, and they don't always
avoid the water dish when they're chasing each other around.

But they're definitely worth all this and more..

-cr

meee
September 24th 05, 05:46 AM
Wendy > wrote in message
...
>
> "meee" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > Wendy > wrote in message
> > ...
> >>
> >> "meee" > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >> > Hi, this is me again, jasmine is started to look decidedly pregnant;
> >> > before
> >> > anyone flames me for not desexing my cat, i've already been through
> >> > this
> >> > with phil & others....if you still feel morally outraged be my guest.
> >> > Anyway
> >> > the reality is, she's bin knocked up, her belly is growing, her teats
> > are
> >> > visible, she's hanging around me meowing and looking at me as if it's
> > all
> >> > my
> >> > fault ( I know, I know, it is, but anyway). She's inspecting
cupboards,
> >> > lying around a lot, and behaving in a very grumpy, I'm miserable and
> >> > everyone else is gonna know it kinda way. How do I know when she's
> >> > going
> >> > to
> >> > drop them? and how soon after she has had the kittens can we have her
> >> > desexed? I'm probably going to keep one of the kittens ( my hubby
says
> > no,
> >> > but i know when they're born *he'll* be picking which one!!!) I'm
> > thinking
> >> > of keeping a boy and having him neutered too-boys are cheaper I
> >> > believe.
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >> If you have no idea when the cat got pregnant then a vet will have to
> >> examine her to give you any kind of accurate idea when she will be due.
I
> >> hope you're keeping her inside until after she has the kittens and is
> >> spayed. You really don't want her having the kittens outside somewhere.
> >>
> >> You can have her spayed once the kittens are weaned. Here again the vet
> > will
> >> best be able to advise you.
> >>
> >> If the cost difference between neutering a male and spaying a female is
> >> an
> >> issue, are you sure you can afford to keep any of the kittens?
> >>
> >> W
> >>
> >>
> > I had a financial problem desexing Jas because shortly after she walked
> > into
> > our lives we moved house from the country to the city, to access
education
> > and jobs not available in the country, so we don't have financial
> > difficulties as much. Now both my husband and I can get jobs, as I can
for
> > the first time access childcare for my kiddies, and our finances will
> > stretch once more to proper vet care. Unfortunately our finance problem
> > coincided with Jasmine's arrival. Vets in the city are also cheaper than
> > country vets- supply & demand. Don't worry, I wouldn't consider getting
an
> > animal unless I could care for it. Jas was not a 'planned baby', but
> > welcome
> > nonetheless. Thanks for your concern, and I hope my answer satisfied
you.
> > I
> > am considering not keeping any kittens...though I'll have to hope me &
> > hubby
> > can resist the 'cute' impulse. It's ahrd to say, because sometimes, you
> > just
> > bond with an animal, and there's not much you can do. If all goes as
> > planned
> > I'll find good homes for them.
> >
> >
>
> If you are really into little kittens you could always volunteer with a
> local rescue group to foster pregnant moms and kittens.
>
>
>
That is a good idea wendy- we have two shelters up here, the young animal
protection society and the rspca. i will see how we go with this first
litter, as i have toddlers, they are very good, but i want to make sure
first. I have fostered a couple of kittens i rescued, but they were too far
gone by the time i got them, and i didn't have access to proper medication
and help, so unfortunately they didn't make it. it was so sad, they were
beautiful little babies.

meee
September 24th 05, 06:34 AM
Calvin Rice > wrote in message
oups.com...
> meee wrote:
> > As you said...I'm going to have a lot of fun!! This is our first litter
of
> > kittens so I can't wait.. ...
>
> There's nothing more fun than kittens, in my opinion, but you should
> be prepared for a lot of work. A big commitment is needed to care
> for even one kitten, and a bigger one for a litter. It's vitally
> important to be extremely careful in every move you make, and
> look at everything in the house as a possible kitten hazard. They
> are especially prone, for example, to falling off of things that they
> climb onto, and they can be suddenly underfoot when you could have
> sworn they were still in another room.
>
> Kittens are easy to train for a litter box, but they also like to make
> a
> bathroom out of loose rags or cloth things like laundry in a corner or
> a sheet on the floor. They're easy to clean up after, but some work
> definitely will be required after they start to move around on their
> own,
> until they are setled into a hygenic routine. They will be messy
> eaters when you first start weaning them too, and they don't always
> avoid the water dish when they're chasing each other around.
>
> But they're definitely worth all this and more..
>
> -cr
>
I am thinking about getting a travel cot for the babies...we had one when
our dogs were puppies, and it was great for keeping them safe, and easy to
take outside and hose off. We have a spare room in which I can put them to
keep them away from my kiddies, and an enclosed area outside where they can
have 'outside time' away from the dogs & kids. I am wondering at what age
should they be weaned..is four or five weeks early?

Wendy
September 24th 05, 11:43 AM
"meee" > wrote in message
...
>
> Calvin Rice > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>> meee wrote:
>> > As you said...I'm going to have a lot of fun!! This is our first litter
> of
>> > kittens so I can't wait.. ...
>>
>> There's nothing more fun than kittens, in my opinion, but you should
>> be prepared for a lot of work. A big commitment is needed to care
>> for even one kitten, and a bigger one for a litter. It's vitally
>> important to be extremely careful in every move you make, and
>> look at everything in the house as a possible kitten hazard. They
>> are especially prone, for example, to falling off of things that they
>> climb onto, and they can be suddenly underfoot when you could have
>> sworn they were still in another room.
>>
>> Kittens are easy to train for a litter box, but they also like to make
>> a
>> bathroom out of loose rags or cloth things like laundry in a corner or
>> a sheet on the floor. They're easy to clean up after, but some work
>> definitely will be required after they start to move around on their
>> own,
>> until they are setled into a hygenic routine. They will be messy
>> eaters when you first start weaning them too, and they don't always
>> avoid the water dish when they're chasing each other around.
>>
>> But they're definitely worth all this and more..
>>
>> -cr
>>
> I am thinking about getting a travel cot for the babies...we had one when
> our dogs were puppies, and it was great for keeping them safe, and easy to
> take outside and hose off. We have a spare room in which I can put them to
> keep them away from my kiddies, and an enclosed area outside where they
> can
> have 'outside time' away from the dogs & kids. I am wondering at what age
> should they be weaned..is four or five weeks early?
>
>

You can start offering soft food at around that age. Also have a litter box
available for them around 4 weeks as well. That way Mom can show the little
ones what to do with it.

Speaking of food, it would be a good idea to put mom cat on kitten food now
and keep her on it until she weans the kittens.

W

September 24th 05, 02:51 PM
Wendy wrote:
> >
>
> If you are really into little kittens you could always volunteer with a
> local rescue group to foster pregnant moms and kittens.

That's the best solution for someone who wants to tend to baby kittens
(and who doesn't). It's a win-win situation. Far cheaper than breeding,
and you're not contributing to overpopulation. The rescue orgs. always
pick up the veterinarian tabs, and help you place the kittens. You get
all the kitten fun without the lifetime responsibility, or the pressure
of selling, or giving away kittens and having to make sure the new
owners spay/neuter.
Downside is, you get attached to the mother cat and kittens, and
invariably end up adopting. But you'd do that with breeder stock &
kittens too.

Sherry

meee
September 25th 05, 01:00 PM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Wendy wrote:
> > >
> >
> > If you are really into little kittens you could always volunteer with a
> > local rescue group to foster pregnant moms and kittens.
>
> That's the best solution for someone who wants to tend to baby kittens
> (and who doesn't). It's a win-win situation. Far cheaper than breeding,
> and you're not contributing to overpopulation. The rescue orgs. always
> pick up the veterinarian tabs, and help you place the kittens. You get
> all the kitten fun without the lifetime responsibility, or the pressure
> of selling, or giving away kittens and having to make sure the new
> owners spay/neuter.
> Downside is, you get attached to the mother cat and kittens, and
> invariably end up adopting. But you'd do that with breeder stock &
> kittens too.
>
> Sherry
>
I'm researching rescue centres in my area, so far i've found one but the
site has no info on volunteering, so i'll have to email them. Just an update
on jasmine, she's getting very big & very tetchy. She spends most of her
time following me around meowing, jumping on my lap then off again, clawing
me, 'play' clawing me, clawing the dogs, eating lots, inspecting cupboards,
and sleeping when sh'e not doing any of these things. So I'm keeping a very
close eye on her.

Helen Miles
September 27th 05, 04:32 PM
"meee" > wrote in message


> As you said...I'm going to have a lot of fun!! This is our first litter of
> kittens so I can't wait...I would like to (eventually) breed Siamese and
> Bombays, so hopefully I will learn a bit, and convince hubby how much fun
> it would be!!!///

Breeding kittens is not a FUN activity to amuse yourself and your
maternal instincts. It is responsibility for lives. I understand that
Jasmine was an accident, but as for breeding Siamese and Bombays...

Rather than add to the population of millions of unwanted euthanised
pets who are murdered every year through indescriminate breeding, how
about you go to a kill shelter at the end of the day so that you can
look at all the lives which are lost because their only crime was to be
born?

Helen M


--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

meee
September 29th 05, 01:17 PM
I can understand your point of view. However most breeders don't breed cats
then release them unmonitored to the general public, but breed them
specifically to improve the breed they admire. cats are sold to other
breeders, enthusiasts and cat showers. The majority of these people that I
have met are responsible with their own cats and responsible in the way they
breed and monitor their kitten's owners. I am not wanting to breed cats
solely for my own interests, but because I like these cats, there aren't
many breeders of them in my state, and I feel that it is a good thing to
promote responsible ownership and breeding of cats. As people pay more for
the animal, and the cat is registered, desexed and vaccinated people are
more likely to take the responsibilty more seriously and care for their cat.
I am definitely for rescuing cats, my present and past cats have been
rescued strays- we don't have many shelters in rural and even city
australia, just ferals who decimate our native animals. However I also feel
that there is a role to be played by breeders of pedigree cats. If you wish
to attack me, are you also protesting to the many breeders in America?? If I
may say so, the majority of stray, feral and shelter cats in Australia are
offspring of the cats brought to Australia by original settlers, along with
many other pests such as foxes and rabbits. They are very very rarely
pedigree animals. I understand you are making sure I am making a responsible
choice, but believ me I am not going into this decision lightly, with a
misguided maternal instinct, but for many reasons.
There are many intelligent species in the Universe. They are all owned by
cats.

Anonymous

One cat just leads to another. -Ernest Hemingway

Helen Miles > wrote in message
news:[email protected] .mailgate.org...
> "meee" > wrote in message
>
>
> > As you said...I'm going to have a lot of fun!! This is our first litter
of
> > kittens so I can't wait...I would like to (eventually) breed Siamese and
> > Bombays, so hopefully I will learn a bit, and convince hubby how much
fun
> > it would be!!!///
>
> Breeding kittens is not a FUN activity to amuse yourself and your
> maternal instincts. It is responsibility for lives. I understand that
> Jasmine was an accident, but as for breeding Siamese and Bombays...
>
> Rather than add to the population of millions of unwanted euthanised
> pets who are murdered every year through indescriminate breeding, how
> about you go to a kill shelter at the end of the day so that you can
> look at all the lives which are lost because their only crime was to be
> born?
>
> Helen M
>
>
> --
> Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

Helen Miles
September 29th 05, 01:41 PM
"meee" > wrote in message


<snipped a very well reasoned argument for breeding>

> I understand you are making sure I am making a responsible
> choice, but believ me I am not going into this decision lightly, with a
> misguided maternal instinct, but for many reasons.///

I guess that we'll have to agree to disagree on this one. :o)

You present some very well reasoned arguments for promoting breeding,
however as someone who is heavily involved in rescue I see the other end
of indescriminate and unethical pure-bred breeders. I do have a problem
with breeding cats as there are too many homeless ones, pedigree and
otherwise (just look at the specialist breed rescues for starters) to (I
personally believe) justify it.

I'll tell my guys to keep their paws crossed for a safe pregnancy for
Jasmine.

Helen M


--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

meee
September 30th 05, 11:25 AM
Thankyou :) I understand your point of view...my sister just finished vet
tech, and as a young and very enthusiastic animal rights activist she
informs me of all the stats and gets morally outraged by a lot of things...I
think we will have to agree to disagree, however what you have said does
make me think seriously about breeding. As you work in US I would be
interested to know how you control your population, the main problems you
have regarding cats not owned by responsible people, for instance
specifically do you have a feral problem in the majority, or more neglected
cats taking to the bush because owners aren't looking after them. The reason
I am asking is because although I would love to breed, I am considering it
still, and have been thinking of volunteering at a shelter but there aren't
many here. In australia our main problem is a large and growing feral
population. Because of the lack of predators, ready availability of food and
temperate weather in australia, we have a feral population in the bush that
is countless generations old. These cats are almost impossible to
rehabilitate, as they grow to a very large size, are very good hunters, and
have generations between domestication and them. Unfortunately the only
option for these cats is culling, as they are rapidly destroying our native
population of animals, and we have already lost several species of possum,
bandicoot, lizard, bird and native mice to these animals. Most cat owners in
rural australia care for their cats quite well, cats are an integral part of
country life as mice (european) reach plague proportions in a very short
space of time, and if you live on a farm they come in from the fields in
their thousands. My record for traps is 1 per minute. So most people have
well cared for and very fat cats!! The main problem is people allowing their
cats out at night, when they breed, procreate and bring home dead wildlife.
The kittens are often part feral and very hard to train, so are killed or
dumped. the rspca here is running regular ads to encourage people to keep
their cats in at night, but as the cost of desexing is high, especially in
rural areas, for many people in drought stricken areas they just don't get
it done. How does this compare to America? I am interested to know, as
someone recently explained the position of the cat in the uk but I am
unaware of your cat issues in the us thanks for reading my v. long post!!

--
There are many intelligent species in the Universe. They are all owned by
cats.

Anonymous

One cat just leads to another. -Ernest Hemingway

Helen Miles > wrote in message
news:[email protected] .mailgate.org...
> "meee" > wrote in message
>
>
> <snipped a very well reasoned argument for breeding>
>
> > I understand you are making sure I am making a responsible
> > choice, but believ me I am not going into this decision lightly, with a
> > misguided maternal instinct, but for many reasons.///
>
> I guess that we'll have to agree to disagree on this one. :o)
>
> You present some very well reasoned arguments for promoting breeding,
> however as someone who is heavily involved in rescue I see the other end
> of indescriminate and unethical pure-bred breeders. I do have a problem
> with breeding cats as there are too many homeless ones, pedigree and
> otherwise (just look at the specialist breed rescues for starters) to (I
> personally believe) justify it.
>
> I'll tell my guys to keep their paws crossed for a safe pregnancy for
> Jasmine.
>
> Helen M
>
>
> --
> Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

Helen Miles
September 30th 05, 03:51 PM
"meee" > wrote in message


As you work in US I would be
> interested to know how you control your population, the main problems you
> have regarding cats not owned by responsible people, for instance
> specifically do you have a feral problem in the majority, or more neglected
> cats taking to the bush because owners aren't looking after them.#

I'm actually based in the UK. We try to control our feral populations by
TNR - Trap neuter return, and pull the kittens out of the colonies for
taming and rehoming.

We also have a very active Cats Protection charity which promotes all
things feline, including TNR and rehoming.

There are a number of USA-ers here who work with cat rescue...maybe they
could pitch in with comments to?

Helen M


--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

-L.
September 30th 05, 04:33 PM
meee wrote:
> Thankyou :) I understand your point of view...my sister just finished vet
> tech, and as a young and very enthusiastic animal rights activist she
> informs me of all the stats and gets morally outraged by a lot of things...I
> think we will have to agree to disagree, however what you have said does
> make me think seriously about breeding. As you work in US I would be
> interested to know how you control your population, the main problems you
> have regarding cats not owned by responsible people, for instance
> specifically do you have a feral problem in the majority, or more neglected
> cats taking to the bush because owners aren't looking after them. The reason
> I am asking is because although I would love to breed, I am considering it
> still, and have been thinking of volunteering at a shelter but there aren't
> many here.

If you can volunter at one, do. It will change your life.

As for feral colonies - it varies depending on who - if anyone - is
caring for the colony. One of the main problems in the US is pet
owners merely abandoning their animals - dumping them to live on the
streets.

Personally, I have in the past TTVNR'd trapped cats - those which come
up positive for feLV and/OR FIV are either placed in shelters dealing
specifically with those animals or euthanized - I don't release
positive cats. If I believe they are an owned cat, I turn them over to
the Humane Society. The others are released, except for kittens. But
by and large my trapped cats have been adults owned by people. I TTVNR
them.

-L.

September 30th 05, 04:38 PM
-L. wrote:


> Personally, I have in the past TTVNR'd trapped cats - those which come
> up positive for feLV and/OR FIV are either placed in shelters dealing
> specifically with those animals or euthanized - I don't release
> positive cats. If I believe they are an owned cat, I turn them over to
> the Humane Society. The others are released, except for kittens. But
> by and large my trapped cats have been adults owned by people. I TTVNR
> them.
>

Can I help with these cats?
I have a large sack, a couple of bricks and I live near a river!

> -L.

meee
October 4th 05, 03:18 AM
The trap-neuter-release program does sound very interesting- I'm not sure if
it's done here though. I think most feral cats in the city are picked up by
people or shelters and re-homed. The main problem here seems to be in the
bush, as we have acres and acres of uninhabited land, with feral cats and
dogs breeding to ridiculous levels. Is there any comparison here in the US?
My cat is the only one in our street- everyone else has dogs, and I try and
keep her in, but as an ex- feral she's very good at getting out.