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Ajanta
September 29th 05, 08:39 AM
With no experience in pets, I started feeding a stray/homeless cat.
Initially, I later learned, she was fed by a nighbor, but felt
harrassed by his cat and children. So she would eat there but climb one
floor up to my porch to relax. It is quieter, sunnier, higher up here.
That's how we met. She was always friendly, dignified, independent.
Never made a mess, never begged, and always wanted to leave after a few
hours. I never knew and still don't all the places she goes to.

When my neighbor left for Europe, it fell upon me to take over feeding.
That was a minor adjustment for her and she easily learned it.

Now, it sounds stupid, but here is my problem: She is not my pet, I
don't know all the places she roams, she may well have other sources of
food even if they are not stable, and I cannot tell when she is really
hungry and when she has already eaten enough elsewhere.

As I said she does not let me know she is hungry but comes and hangs
around. If I don't offer her food, she won't beg. But, perhaps because
she may have spent many hungry days, she finds it hard to resist the
food that is offered. (On rare occasions, when she is neither hungry
nor likes the food served, she'd eat only a little and most of it is
wasted, but that is the smaller problem.) The bigger and more frequent
problem is that she already ate something, tends to overeat and get
sick. This happens about once a week.

So, dear experts on cat behavior, please help me figure this out. How
can I get a hint whether she is hungry or full?

I have tried asking around if anyone feeds her (no one I asked). I have
tried putting a can in front of her and watch her reaction, but I have
no clue until I open the can and watch the results. (Sorry to be gross,
but I can tell from her vomit that mostly it isn't hairball but some
food in addition to what I gave.)

Thanks!

whayface
September 29th 05, 01:54 PM
On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 07:39:29 GMT, Ajanta > wrote:

>With no experience in pets, I started feeding a stray/homeless cat.
>Initially, I later learned, she was fed by a nighbor, but felt
>harrassed by his cat and children. So she would eat there but climb one
>floor up to my porch to relax. It is quieter, sunnier, higher up here.
>That's how we met. She was always friendly, dignified, independent.
>Never made a mess, never begged, and always wanted to leave after a few
>hours. I never knew and still don't all the places she goes to.
>
>When my neighbor left for Europe, it fell upon me to take over feeding.
>That was a minor adjustment for her and she easily learned it.
>
>Now, it sounds stupid, but here is my problem: She is not my pet, I
>don't know all the places she roams, she may well have other sources of
>food even if they are not stable, and I cannot tell when she is really
>hungry and when she has already eaten enough elsewhere.
>
>As I said she does not let me know she is hungry but comes and hangs
>around. If I don't offer her food, she won't beg. But, perhaps because
>she may have spent many hungry days, she finds it hard to resist the
>food that is offered. (On rare occasions, when she is neither hungry
>nor likes the food served, she'd eat only a little and most of it is
>wasted, but that is the smaller problem.) The bigger and more frequent
>problem is that she already ate something, tends to overeat and get
>sick. This happens about once a week.
>
>So, dear experts on cat behavior, please help me figure this out. How
>can I get a hint whether she is hungry or full?
>
>I have tried asking around if anyone feeds her (no one I asked). I have
>tried putting a can in front of her and watch her reaction, but I have
>no clue until I open the can and watch the results. (Sorry to be gross,
>but I can tell from her vomit that mostly it isn't hairball but some
>food in addition to what I gave.)
>
>Thanks!


I would say to leave a bowl of dry food out where she can get at it and eat whenever it is
hungry along with some water and ocassionaly give it some canned.




http://members.aol.com/larrystark/

http://members.aol.com/larrystark/strays.htm

Jason James
September 29th 05, 06:46 PM
"Ajanta" > wrote in message
...
> With no experience in pets, I started feeding a stray/homeless cat.
> Initially, I later learned, she was fed by a nighbor,

Yeah, they will have multiple feeding points,..it's part of their survival
response.



but felt
> harrassed by his cat and children. So she would eat there but climb one
> floor up to my porch to relax. It is quieter, sunnier, higher up here.
> That's how we met. She was always friendly, dignified, independent.
> Never made a mess, never begged, and always wanted to leave after a few
> hours. I never knew and still don't all the places she goes to.

They usually all do that. They are conditioned to live outside. Don't feel
as tho she is rejecting you. She's just doing her rounds. Eventually, she
will spend more and more time with you, as she feels she's wanted and
there's food there every time.



> When my neighbor left for Europe, it fell upon me to take over feeding.
> That was a minor adjustment for her and she easily learned it.
>
> Now, it sounds stupid, but here is my problem: She is not my pet, I
> don't know all the places she roams, she may well have other sources of
> food even if they are not stable, and I cannot tell when she is really
> hungry and when she has already eaten enough elsewhere.

As far as I know, cats don't eat unless they are hungary. They may just take
a nibble,..but no more than that if they're full.


> As I said she does not let me know she is hungry but comes and hangs
> around. If I don't offer her food, she won't beg. But, perhaps because
> she may have spent many hungry days, she finds it hard to resist the
> food that is offered. (On rare occasions, when she is neither hungry
> nor likes the food served, she'd eat only a little and most of it is
> wasted, but that is the smaller problem.) The bigger and more frequent
> problem is that she already ate something, tends to overeat and get
> sick. This happens about once a week.
>
> So, dear experts on cat behavior, please help me figure this out. How
> can I get a hint whether she is hungry or full?

My experience is, that all cats have a routine when they want to tell you
they want some food. Perhaps she gives you more attention or hangs around
the cupboard or kitchen where the food is prepared/ tins opened?


> I have tried asking around if anyone feeds her (no one I asked). I have
> tried putting a can in front of her and watch her reaction, but I have
> no clue until I open the can and watch the results. (Sorry to be gross,
> but I can tell from her vomit that mostly it isn't hairball but some
> food in addition to what I gave.)

The vomiting maybe just a response to a different food, or she has just
ingested some grass, or she maybe feeling a little off. Cats eat grass to
make themselves vomit,...but I get the impression, some do it (eat grass) as
a reflex, even when they aren't feeling sick.

> Thanks!

Jason

Brian Link
September 29th 05, 07:56 PM
On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 12:54:53 GMT, whayface
> wrote:

>On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 07:39:29 GMT, Ajanta > wrote:
>
>>With no experience in pets, I started feeding a stray/homeless cat.
>>Initially, I later learned, she was fed by a nighbor, but felt
>>harrassed by his cat and children. So she would eat there but climb one
>>floor up to my porch to relax. It is quieter, sunnier, higher up here.
>>That's how we met. She was always friendly, dignified, independent.
>>Never made a mess, never begged, and always wanted to leave after a few
>>hours. I never knew and still don't all the places she goes to.
>>
>>When my neighbor left for Europe, it fell upon me to take over feeding.
>>That was a minor adjustment for her and she easily learned it.
>>
>>Now, it sounds stupid, but here is my problem: She is not my pet, I
>>don't know all the places she roams, she may well have other sources of
>>food even if they are not stable, and I cannot tell when she is really
>>hungry and when she has already eaten enough elsewhere.
>>
>>As I said she does not let me know she is hungry but comes and hangs
>>around. If I don't offer her food, she won't beg. But, perhaps because
>>she may have spent many hungry days, she finds it hard to resist the
>>food that is offered. (On rare occasions, when she is neither hungry
>>nor likes the food served, she'd eat only a little and most of it is
>>wasted, but that is the smaller problem.) The bigger and more frequent
>>problem is that she already ate something, tends to overeat and get
>>sick. This happens about once a week.
>>
>>So, dear experts on cat behavior, please help me figure this out. How
>>can I get a hint whether she is hungry or full?
>>
>>I have tried asking around if anyone feeds her (no one I asked). I have
>>tried putting a can in front of her and watch her reaction, but I have
>>no clue until I open the can and watch the results. (Sorry to be gross,
>>but I can tell from her vomit that mostly it isn't hairball but some
>>food in addition to what I gave.)
>>
>>Thanks!
>
>
>I would say to leave a bowl of dry food out where she can get at it and eat whenever it is
>hungry along with some water and ocassionaly give it some canned.
>
>
>
>
>http://members.aol.com/larrystark/
>
>http://members.aol.com/larrystark/strays.htm
>
>

One thing I've noticed is that the squirrels love the dry catfood I
put out.. =(

BLink

Ajanta
September 29th 05, 08:01 PM
Jason James > wrote:

Thanks Jason. Internet is a wonderful thing, still capable of amazing
me that I can post a question in Chicgao and get a response from
Australia...

: My experience is, that all cats have a routine when they want to tell you
: they want some food. Perhaps she gives you more attention or hangs
: around the cupboard or kitchen where the food is prepared/ tins opened?

Certainly, if I walk to the cupboard she follows, if I show a can she'd
try to paw it, if I open the can she perks up. But she does it all the
time, not more when she is hungry and less when she should not be. At
least I have not been able to differentiate.

Maybe the problem is I have always fed her promptly when she arrived,
so she knows food is coming and doesn't have to tell me anything? I can
try to play cool and see what happens. Of course, you hate to play such
games with a little animal.

: The vomiting maybe just a response to a different food, or she has just
: ingested some grass, or she maybe feeling a little off.

She does eat "different" foods, but the vomiting comes only every 7-8
days.

As I said I had no experience with pets. When I started with this cat,
I read a little and the consensus was canned food is better than dry
for their health. So I started buying canned, whatever was on sale.
This way I have fed her many different brands and many varieties within
a brand. She is pretty good about eating what I offer except a few
types she clearly doesn't like and I avoid those.

I get 5.5 oz cans and one suffices for two meals. I am not very good at
reheating the refrigerated portion, because she is always more
enthusiastic about the first 1/2 of the can than the second. This is
regardless of brands and type.

: Cats eat grass to make themselves vomit...

Well, she does have access to a lot of grass! Does this mean an
indoor-only cat vomits less?

whitershadeofpale
September 29th 05, 09:02 PM
Jason James wrote:
> "Ajanta" > wrote in message
> ...
> > With no experience in pets, I started feeding a stray/homeless cat.
> > Initially, I later learned, she was fed by a nighbor,
>
> Yeah, they will have multiple feeding points,..it's part of their survival
> response.


This would explain my own behavior

Thanks JJ

Observer
September 30th 05, 12:18 AM
"Ajanta" > wrote in message
...
> With no experience in pets, I started feeding a stray/homeless cat.
> Initially, I later learned, she was fed by a nighbor, but felt
> harrassed by his cat and children. So she would eat there but climb one
> floor up to my porch to relax. It is quieter, sunnier, higher up here.
> That's how we met. She was always friendly, dignified, independent.
> Never made a mess, never begged, and always wanted to leave after a few
> hours. I never knew and still don't all the places she goes to.
>
> When my neighbor left for Europe, it fell upon me to take over feeding.
> That was a minor adjustment for her and she easily learned it.
>
> Now, it sounds stupid, but here is my problem: She is not my pet, I
> don't know all the places she roams, she may well have other sources of
> food even if they are not stable, and I cannot tell when she is really
> hungry and when she has already eaten enough elsewhere.
>
> As I said she does not let me know she is hungry but comes and hangs
> around. If I don't offer her food, she won't beg. But, perhaps because
> she may have spent many hungry days, she finds it hard to resist the
> food that is offered. (On rare occasions, when she is neither hungry
> nor likes the food served, she'd eat only a little and most of it is
> wasted, but that is the smaller problem.) The bigger and more frequent
> problem is that she already ate something, tends to overeat and get
> sick. This happens about once a week.
>
> So, dear experts on cat behavior, please help me figure this out. How
> can I get a hint whether she is hungry or full?
>
> I have tried asking around if anyone feeds her (no one I asked). I have
> tried putting a can in front of her and watch her reaction, but I have
> no clue until I open the can and watch the results. (Sorry to be gross,
> but I can tell from her vomit that mostly it isn't hairball but some
> food in addition to what I gave.)
>
> Thanks!

I am an expert on feral and or palpable strays. The responses you got were
terrific, and all were true to my own experience. My concern is whether she
is spayed or not--a question that will soon be answered if she is
accompanied by roaming toms who pick up the mating scent.

If she is palpable and you notice an influx of male activity, for goodness
sake scoop her up and spend the necessary funds to get her fixed. If that
is not in your budget, look for municipal or charitable orgs that will do it
cheap (and safely).

Otherwise your next posting to this group will be a query about how to
attend to a litter of kittens <g>.

--The Observer

Ajanta
September 30th 05, 12:52 AM
Observer <[email protected]> wrote:

: If she is palpable and you notice an influx of male activity, for goodness
: sake scoop her up and spend the necessary funds to get her fixed. If that
: is not in your budget, look for municipal or charitable orgs that will do it
: cheap (and safely).

Thanks. Actually, I just posted that question in another thread:

: Subject: Caring for a stray (3): Any charitable vets/clinics in greater
: Chicago area?
:
: "Still continuing about the stray/homeless cat I feed...
: I don't know if she has been spayed, gotten any shots ever, what her
: general health condition is, etc.
:
: "It would give me great peace of mind if there are any charitable vets
: or clinics in greater Chicago area, who could examine her and provide
: whatever they deem necessary.
:
: "I have never had pets, and don't know the scene. We would be grateful
: for any reference. I don't mind driving 1-2 hours for good quality
: service."

No replies so far. I would like her to be examined, get speayed if
needed, and get any required shots.

mlbriggs
September 30th 05, 01:05 AM
On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 07:39:29 +0000, Ajanta wrote:

> With no experience in pets, I started feeding a stray/homeless cat.
> Initially, I later learned, she was fed by a nighbor, but felt harrassed
> by his cat and children. So she would eat there but climb one floor up to
> my porch to relax. It is quieter, sunnier, higher up here. That's how we
> met. She was always friendly, dignified, independent. Never made a mess,
> never begged, and always wanted to leave after a few hours. I never knew
> and still don't all the places she goes to.
>
> When my neighbor left for Europe, it fell upon me to take over feeding.
> That was a minor adjustment for her and she easily learned it.
>
> Now, it sounds stupid, but here is my problem: She is not my pet, I don't
> know all the places she roams, she may well have other sources of food
> even if they are not stable, and I cannot tell when she is really hungry
> and when she has already eaten enough elsewhere.
>
> As I said she does not let me know she is hungry but comes and hangs
> around. If I don't offer her food, she won't beg. But, perhaps because she
> may have spent many hungry days, she finds it hard to resist the food that
> is offered. (On rare occasions, when she is neither hungry nor likes the
> food served, she'd eat only a little and most of it is wasted, but that is
> the smaller problem.) The bigger and more frequent problem is that she
> already ate something, tends to overeat and get sick. This happens about
> once a week.
>
> So, dear experts on cat behavior, please help me figure this out. How can
> I get a hint whether she is hungry or full?
>
> I have tried asking around if anyone feeds her (no one I asked). I have
> tried putting a can in front of her and watch her reaction, but I have no
> clue until I open the can and watch the results. (Sorry to be gross, but I
> can tell from her vomit that mostly it isn't hairball but some food in
> addition to what I gave.)
>
> Thanks!


Have you tried inviting her to come in? MLB

whayface
September 30th 05, 01:45 AM
On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 13:56:23 -0500, Brian Link > wrote:

>>>With no experience in pets, I started feeding a stray/homeless cat.
>>>Initially, I later learned, she was fed by a nighbor, but felt
>>>harrassed by his cat and children. So she would eat there but climb one
>>>floor up to my porch to relax. It is quieter, sunnier, higher up here.
>>>That's how we met. She was always friendly, dignified, independent.
>>>Never made a mess, never begged, and always wanted to leave after a few
>>>hours. I never knew and still don't all the places she goes to.
>>>
>>>When my neighbor left for Europe, it fell upon me to take over feeding.
>>>That was a minor adjustment for her and she easily learned it.
>>>
>>>Now, it sounds stupid, but here is my problem: She is not my pet, I
>>>don't know all the places she roams, she may well have other sources of
>>>food even if they are not stable, and I cannot tell when she is really
>>>hungry and when she has already eaten enough elsewhere.
>>>
>>>As I said she does not let me know she is hungry but comes and hangs
>>>around. If I don't offer her food, she won't beg. But, perhaps because
>>>she may have spent many hungry days, she finds it hard to resist the
>>>food that is offered. (On rare occasions, when she is neither hungry
>>>nor likes the food served, she'd eat only a little and most of it is
>>>wasted, but that is the smaller problem.) The bigger and more frequent
>>>problem is that she already ate something, tends to overeat and get
>>>sick. This happens about once a week.
>>>
>>>So, dear experts on cat behavior, please help me figure this out. How
>>>can I get a hint whether she is hungry or full?
>>>
>>>I have tried asking around if anyone feeds her (no one I asked). I have
>>>tried putting a can in front of her and watch her reaction, but I have
>>>no clue until I open the can and watch the results. (Sorry to be gross,
>>>but I can tell from her vomit that mostly it isn't hairball but some
>>>food in addition to what I gave.)
>>>
>>>Thanks!
>>
>>
>>I would say to leave a bowl of dry food out where she can get at it and eat whenever it is
>>hungry along with some water and ocassionaly give it some canned.
>>
>>
>
>One thing I've noticed is that the squirrels love the dry catfood I
>put out.. =(
>
>BLink

Here when I put the dry food out the birds find it and have a field day or picnic,
especially during the winter, no matter where I put it. Even under porch with a hole just
big enough for cats.



http://members.aol.com/larrystark/

http://members.aol.com/larrystark/strays.htm

Ajanta
September 30th 05, 01:47 AM
mlbriggs > wrote:

: Have you tried inviting her to come in? MLB

She come in pretty regularly, and at times watches TV, but all said and
done she was attracted to my apartment because of quiet sunny porch
(not food, as I didn't feed her for months). She tends to visit in the
afternoon, when there is full sun in the porch, and that's where we
both spend most of our time together.

I don't know what she would do as it gets colder. Obviously, lacking
her fur coating, at least *I* won't be in the porch a whole lot.

Jason James
September 30th 05, 05:34 AM
"Ajanta" > wrote in message
...
> Jason James > wrote:
>
> Thanks Jason. Internet is a wonderful thing, still capable of amazing
> me that I can post a question in Chicgao and get a response from
> Australia...
>
> : My experience is, that all cats have a routine when they want to tell
you
> : they want some food. Perhaps she gives you more attention or hangs
> : around the cupboard or kitchen where the food is prepared/ tins opened?
>
> Certainly, if I walk to the cupboard she follows,

Yep,..that is a strong sign. Our House cat does that when she's hungery.
Mind you, if there are cat-biscuits leftover from the day before, she'll
reject those in favour of fresh ones,..a bit like us :-)


if I show a can she'd
> try to paw it, if I open the can she perks up. But she does it all the
> time, not more when she is hungry and less when she should not be. At
> least I have not been able to differentiate.

Sounds like she developed a pattern of feeding where she asks for food even
if she's eaten a couple of hours before. We also programmed our cat that
way, without wishing to. Bringing out food or making it available once or
twice a day only is a better way.


> Maybe the problem is I have always fed her promptly when she arrived,
> so she knows food is coming and doesn't have to tell me anything? I can
> try to play cool and see what happens. Of course, you hate to play such
> games with a little animal.

It's a bit tough, but it provides order,..where otherwise there's chaos :-)


> : The vomiting maybe just a response to a different food, or she has just
> : ingested some grass, or she maybe feeling a little off.
>
> She does eat "different" foods, but the vomiting comes only every 7-8
> days.
>
> As I said I had no experience with pets. When I started with this cat,
> I read a little and the consensus was canned food is better than dry
> for their health. So I started buying canned, whatever was on sale.
> This way I have fed her many different brands and many varieties within
> a brand. She is pretty good about eating what I offer except a few
> types she clearly doesn't like and I avoid those.

Yeah,..that's what we did. They seem to like lots of gravy,.especially
canned salmon and vegetables with fish-gravy,..they love it! I;ve yet to see
either of ours eat the peas that come in some cans. Sheesh what are they
thinking,..cats dont eat peas..

> I get 5.5 oz cans and one suffices for two meals. I am not very good at
> reheating the refrigerated portion, because she is always more
> enthusiastic about the first 1/2 of the can than the second. This is
> regardless of brands and type.

Yep,..same thing here, we waste a bit, which I dont like doing,..but I think
its not just you and I that have this prob with our furry friends.


> : Cats eat grass to make themselves vomit...
>
> Well, she does have access to a lot of grass! Does this mean an
> indoor-only cat vomits less?

Yes. They seem to eat it any time they get out after being inside (the house
cats we've had I mean).

best o luck

Jason

Lesley
September 30th 05, 10:55 AM
! I;ve yet to see
> either of ours eat the peas that come in some cans. Sheesh what are they
> thinking,..cats dont eat peas..
>
Ummm...Sarrasine eats the peas and the carrots. Then again this is not
an achievement as she devours pretty much anything in her bowl

Isis(RB) adored a variety of "Sheba" that contained mushrooms and she
picked the mushrooms out and ate them first. She was also very fond of
cod and carrot catfood

A while ago some new catfood came onto the market and one variety was
Pilchard in tomato sauce so we tried that and to our sheer disbelief
Fugazi (RB- Isis' sister) wolfed the lot down and licked the bowl until
she could see her face it in. The same brand (can't remember what it's
called now- isn't around anymore) produced a Xmas special with turkey
and cranberries and that was also a big hit with them

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

whayface
September 30th 05, 01:33 PM
On Fri, 30 Sep 2005 04:34:18 GMT, "Jason James" > wrote:

>
>Yep,..that is a strong sign. Our House cat does that when she's hungery.
>Mind you, if there are cat-biscuits leftover from the day before, she'll
>reject those in favour of fresh ones,..a bit like us :-)

Mine will wake me each morning for fresh food even if there is still food there from the
nigth before and then they eat the fresh like they have not been fed for a week but my ex
has one that prefers food after it has stood for a day and will bypass the fresh for the
old. Go figure!!



http://members.aol.com/larrystark/

http://members.aol.com/larrystark/strays.htm

Jason James
September 30th 05, 08:34 PM
"Lesley" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> ! I;ve yet to see
> > either of ours eat the peas that come in some cans. Sheesh what are they
> > thinking,..cats dont eat peas..
> >
> Ummm...Sarrasine eats the peas and the carrots. Then again this is not
> an achievement as she devours pretty much anything in her bowl
>
> Isis(RB) adored a variety of "Sheba" that contained mushrooms and she
> picked the mushrooms out and ate them first. She was also very fond of
> cod and carrot catfood
>
> A while ago some new catfood came onto the market and one variety was
> Pilchard in tomato sauce so we tried that and to our sheer disbelief
> Fugazi (RB- Isis' sister) wolfed the lot down and licked the bowl until
> she could see her face it in. The same brand (can't remember what it's
> called now- isn't around anymore) produced a Xmas special with turkey
> and cranberries and that was also a big hit with them
>
> Lesley
>
> Slave of the Fabulous Furballs


Fair enough,..I guess just because cats are predatorial, doesn't mean they
just eat only meat.

Jason

Jason James
September 30th 05, 08:40 PM
"whayface" > wrote in message
...
> On Fri, 30 Sep 2005 04:34:18 GMT, "Jason James"
> wrote:
>
> >
> >Yep,..that is a strong sign. Our House cat does that when she's hungery.
> >Mind you, if there are cat-biscuits leftover from the day before, she'll
> >reject those in favour of fresh ones,..a bit like us :-)
>
> Mine will wake me each morning for fresh food even if there is still food
there from the
> nigth before and then they eat the fresh like they have not been fed for a
week but my ex
> has one that prefers food after it has stood for a day and will bypass the
fresh for the
> old. Go figure!!

He wakes you up! Isn't that typical of a cat :-)

Yeah,..our ex-stray will do that (wait for some food to be out for a while).
I'm at the point of buying smaller cans, so there's no leftovers which end
up being rejected.

Jason

Kiran
October 1st 05, 01:48 PM
Jason James > wrote:

: I'm at the point of buying smaller cans, so there's no leftovers
: which end up being rejected.

The only bummer is they cost almost the same as larger cans...

Jason James
October 2nd 05, 01:58 AM
"Kiran" > wrote in message
...
> Jason James > wrote:
>
> : I'm at the point of buying smaller cans, so there's no leftovers
> : which end up being rejected.
>
> The only bummer is they cost almost the same as larger cans...

Indeed,..they don't make it easy.

Jason

Jo Firey
October 2nd 05, 02:43 AM
"Kiran" > wrote in message
...
> Jason James > wrote:
>
> : I'm at the point of buying smaller cans, so there's no leftovers
> : which end up being rejected.
>
> The only bummer is they cost almost the same as larger cans...

Well, at least with the smaller cans, you get the same single feeding for
the price and they take up less space and not as much stinky leftover. I'm
just glad the little cans don't cost more.

Jo

Christina Websell
October 5th 05, 07:37 PM
"Ajanta" > wrote in message
...
> With no experience in pets, I started feeding a stray/homeless cat.
> Initially, I later learned, she was fed by a nighbor, but felt
> harrassed by his cat and children. So she would eat there but climb one
> floor up to my porch to relax. It is quieter, sunnier, higher up here.
> That's how we met. She was always friendly, dignified, independent.
> Never made a mess, never begged, and always wanted to leave after a few
> hours. I never knew and still don't all the places she goes to.
>
> When my neighbor left for Europe, it fell upon me to take over feeding.
> That was a minor adjustment for her and she easily learned it.
>
> Now, it sounds stupid, but here is my problem: She is not my pet, I
> don't know all the places she roams, she may well have other sources of
> food even if they are not stable, and I cannot tell when she is really
> hungry and when she has already eaten enough elsewhere.
>
> As I said she does not let me know she is hungry but comes and hangs
> around. If I don't offer her food, she won't beg. But, perhaps because
> she may have spent many hungry days, she finds it hard to resist the
> food that is offered. (On rare occasions, when she is neither hungry
> nor likes the food served, she'd eat only a little and most of it is
> wasted, but that is the smaller problem.) The bigger and more frequent
> problem is that she already ate something, tends to overeat and get
> sick. This happens about once a week.
>
> So, dear experts on cat behavior, please help me figure this out. How
> can I get a hint whether she is hungry or full?
>
> I have tried asking around if anyone feeds her (no one I asked). I have
> tried putting a can in front of her and watch her reaction, but I have
> no clue until I open the can and watch the results. (Sorry to be gross,
> but I can tell from her vomit that mostly it isn't hairball but some
> food in addition to what I gave.)
>
> Thanks!

I had a similar problem with Kitty Fc when she was living in my garden. Did
she belong anywhere, and who was feeding her if anyone?
It turned out that she was begging here and there from neighbours and
getting table scraps. Once I was certain she was homeless and fed her twice
a day without fail she stopped going around filching where she could because
she became confident of twice daily meals.

Tweed
...and now she is queen of the house..

Shadow Walker
October 17th 05, 09:20 PM
Well is her weight good? Is she skinny, athletic, fat? All these are
indicators if she is eating well. You also might want to see if she needs
hairball remedy. Even if you do not see hairballs they are still there.
You could also putt a safety collar on her and place a sale type tag that
reads: If you are this cats owner please call, and leave your phone number.
If not one calls assume she is homeless and leave food out all the time, if
you want her to stay around. You might end up meeting allot of people and
making friends.
Gina


"Christina Websell" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Ajanta" > wrote in message
> ...
>> With no experience in pets, I started feeding a stray/homeless cat.
>> Initially, I later learned, she was fed by a nighbor, but felt
>> harrassed by his cat and children. So she would eat there but climb one
>> floor up to my porch to relax. It is quieter, sunnier, higher up here.
>> That's how we met. She was always friendly, dignified, independent.
>> Never made a mess, never begged, and always wanted to leave after a few
>> hours. I never knew and still don't all the places she goes to.
>>
>> When my neighbor left for Europe, it fell upon me to take over feeding.
>> That was a minor adjustment for her and she easily learned it.
>>
>> Now, it sounds stupid, but here is my problem: She is not my pet, I
>> don't know all the places she roams, she may well have other sources of
>> food even if they are not stable, and I cannot tell when she is really
>> hungry and when she has already eaten enough elsewhere.
>>
>> As I said she does not let me know she is hungry but comes and hangs
>> around. If I don't offer her food, she won't beg. But, perhaps because
>> she may have spent many hungry days, she finds it hard to resist the
>> food that is offered. (On rare occasions, when she is neither hungry
>> nor likes the food served, she'd eat only a little and most of it is
>> wasted, but that is the smaller problem.) The bigger and more frequent
>> problem is that she already ate something, tends to overeat and get
>> sick. This happens about once a week.
>>
>> So, dear experts on cat behavior, please help me figure this out. How
>> can I get a hint whether she is hungry or full?
>>
>> I have tried asking around if anyone feeds her (no one I asked). I have
>> tried putting a can in front of her and watch her reaction, but I have
>> no clue until I open the can and watch the results. (Sorry to be gross,
>> but I can tell from her vomit that mostly it isn't hairball but some
>> food in addition to what I gave.)
>>
>> Thanks!
>
> I had a similar problem with Kitty Fc when she was living in my garden.
> Did she belong anywhere, and who was feeding her if anyone?
> It turned out that she was begging here and there from neighbours and
> getting table scraps. Once I was certain she was homeless and fed her
> twice a day without fail she stopped going around filching where she could
> because she became confident of twice daily meals.
>
> Tweed
> ..and now she is queen of the house..
>
>
>
>
>
>

Fat Freddy
October 17th 05, 11:32 PM
> As I said she does not let me know she is hungry ...

If you give her food and she eats it, she was hungry.
If she doesn't eat it, she wasn't hungry.

Ajanta
October 18th 05, 06:40 AM
Shadow Walker > wrote:

: Well is her weight good? Is she skinny, athletic, fat? All these are
: indicators if she is eating well.

I didn't mean how to tell if she is generally well fed, but if she was
actually hungry or had already eaten that specific day! The reason is,
if I guess wrong and open a can, it goes waste.

She tends to visit my porch regularly whether she is hungry or not, she
takes interest in the cupboard and cans whether she is going to eat or
not after I open one, so I haven't been able to use such behavior to
guess if she is actually hungry.

Ajanta
October 18th 05, 06:48 AM
Fat Freddy > wrote:

: If you give her food and she eats it, she was hungry.
: If she doesn't eat it, she wasn't hungry.

I know but if I knew she is not hungry and doens't plan to eat, then my
food won't go waste. This way, I put out the food, and if she leaves
with only a nibble or two or even without eating, then that food is
practically wasted. I have tried saving such portions but she resists
eating them later even when she is hungry.

Upscale
October 18th 05, 07:05 AM
"Ajanta" > wrote in message news:181020050048536913%
>
> I know but if I knew she is not hungry and doens't plan to eat, then my
> food won't go waste. This way, I put out the food, and if she leaves
> with only a nibble or two or even without eating, then that food is
> practically wasted. I have tried saving such portions but she resists
> eating them later even when she is hungry.

Pick up some cat treats with a resealable pouch. If she really goes for a
few of those, then she's probably hungry and you can try opening a can. You
can also get plastic lids for cans too on the off chance she isn't really
hungry. After all, you're only talking about .50 cents or so to find out.

mlbriggs
October 18th 05, 03:38 PM
On Tue, 18 Oct 2005 05:40:51 +0000, Ajanta wrote:

> Shadow Walker > wrote:
>
> : Well is her weight good? Is she skinny, athletic, fat? All these are
> : indicators if she is eating well.
>
> I didn't mean how to tell if she is generally well fed, but if she was
> actually hungry or had already eaten that specific day! The reason is, if
> I guess wrong and open a can, it goes waste.
>
> She tends to visit my porch regularly whether she is hungry or not, she
> takes interest in the cupboard and cans whether she is going to eat or not
> after I open one, so I haven't been able to use such behavior to guess if
> she is actually hungry.


Find out if there are any books on "Mental Telepathy" -- then study/

Ajanta
October 18th 05, 06:51 PM
Upscale > wrote:

: You can also get plastic lids for cans too on the off chance
: she isn't really hungry.

I have those. Even with a lid I am uncomfortable about leaving
food out for up to 24 hours it may take her to return, but if
I refrigerate and later rewarm she would refuse it anyway.

: After all, you're only talking about .50 cents or so to find out.

Yes, the expense is not a big deal, it has been more like simply
a desire to figure her behavior. Also maybe the feeling that food
should not be wasted.

Fate may have solved that problem for me in an unexpected
way: I just started feeding a second stray. She is not so regular yet
but will probably become so very soon. Then, any opened can is
unlikely to remain uneaten for long.