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View Full Version : Caring for a stray (2): Winter preparation


Ajanta
September 29th 05, 08:59 AM
Continuing about the stray/homeless cat I feed.

I live in Midwest and we will have temperatures down to 20's and wind
chills into single digits. I don't know what she did last winter.
Actually I don't know if she would even need my help this winter. But I
want to have some help for her on my porch should it be needed.

I would be most grateful to hear ideas from those of you who have
created warm corners to ferals.

I have been reading around and lurked in the ng's as well and this is
what I have so far:

Two styrofoam coolers, one inside other, a hole cut out for entry/exit,
a layer of blankets with the microwavable heating "frisbee" (forget the
name) under them. Do I need extra insulation between the walls? I can
even cover the entrance with hanging strips of plastic the way they
have in some grocery store freezers.

I have no building skills but this I can manage. It would also be
affordable enough and if she doesn't use it, well, I'll have no
regrets.

I have outlets available but am afraid of using electrical devices, of
causing a horrible harm with good intentions. However, if you have
experience with something that is absolutely catproof (in your
experience, not manufacturer's claim), I can consider it.

All comments and suggestions appreciated.

Jane
September 29th 05, 01:00 PM
>All comments and suggestions appreciated.

What they mostly need is a place to get out of the wind. Animals will
curl up and generate their own heat. They're wearing fur coats, after
all. You can set up such a place and put an old blanket in it
for softness if you like, but there's no need for electric heating
anything, really. Unless it gets really bitter cold (like in the
minus double-digits), they'll be fine.

Jane

whayface
September 29th 05, 01:50 PM
On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 12:00:16 -0000, (Jane) wrote:

>
>What they mostly need is a place to get out of the wind. Animals will
>curl up and generate their own heat. They're wearing fur coats, after
>all. You can set up such a place and put an old blanket in it
>for softness if you like, but there's no need for electric heating
>anything, really. Unless it gets really bitter cold (like in the
>minus double-digits), they'll be fine.
>
>Jane
>


I just took a couple old quilts / comforters that I got from the thrift store and put them
under a nieghbors porch (With his OK) which is closed in on bottom but there are a couple
holes big enough for cats to get under. I worked the comforters through the holes then
used a long pole to push them to the back against the base of house away from the holes.
I also started putting dry food there to get them used to it before it gets too cold. It
is not the greatest but it gets them out of the Michigan (USA) winter weather.

I do not live in that area but make a trip just about daily to care for the cats in the
area and the area is not the greatest. The nieghbor had his car broken into twice, they
stole some plastic chairs off another porch, ETC so putting any kind of house out is kind
of out of the question. It would probably be gone the first night.




http://members.aol.com/larrystark/

http://members.aol.com/larrystark/strays.htm

alt4
September 29th 05, 06:47 PM
One other thing to prepare for winter mix kitten chow with adult food. The
kitten food has many more nutrients and protein in it. We have one who is
still a kitten, but lol he wants what the adults are eating, ehh by now it's
okay and he isn't an outdoor cat.

--
"Other than telling us how to live, think,
marry, pray, vote, invest, educate our
children and now, die, I think the
Republicans have done a fine job of
getting government out of our personal
lives."
"whayface" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 12:00:16 -0000, (Jane) wrote:
>
>>
>>What they mostly need is a place to get out of the wind. Animals will
>>curl up and generate their own heat. They're wearing fur coats, after
>>all. You can set up such a place and put an old blanket in it
>>for softness if you like, but there's no need for electric heating
>>anything, really. Unless it gets really bitter cold (like in the
>>minus double-digits), they'll be fine.
>>
>>Jane
>>
>
>
> I just took a couple old quilts / comforters that I got from the thrift
> store and put them
> under a nieghbors porch (With his OK) which is closed in on bottom but
> there are a couple
> holes big enough for cats to get under. I worked the comforters through
> the holes then
> used a long pole to push them to the back against the base of house away
> from the holes.
> I also started putting dry food there to get them used to it before it
> gets too cold. It
> is not the greatest but it gets them out of the Michigan (USA) winter
> weather.
>
> I do not live in that area but make a trip just about daily to care for
> the cats in the
> area and the area is not the greatest. The nieghbor had his car broken
> into twice, they
> stole some plastic chairs off another porch, ETC so putting any kind of
> house out is kind
> of out of the question. It would probably be gone the first night.
>
>
>
>
> http://members.aol.com/larrystark/
>
> http://members.aol.com/larrystark/strays.htm
>
>
>

Ajanta
September 29th 05, 07:17 PM
Jane > wrote:

: What they mostly need is a place to get out of the wind. Animals will
: curl up and generate their own heat. They're wearing fur coats, after
: all. You can set up such a place and put an old blanket in it
: for softness if you like, but there's no need for electric heating
: anything, really. Unless it gets really bitter cold (like in the
: minus double-digits), they'll be fine.

If only protection from wind is needed and not extra insulation, then I
need not double up the styrofoam containers and one will be as good?
(I am thinking about cheap coolers sold in stores. I'll cut a hole for
entry/exit and point it towards the house wall.)

Ajanta
September 29th 05, 07:21 PM
: Two styrofoam coolers, one inside other, a hole cut out for entry/exit,
: a layer of blankets with the microwavable heating "frisbee" (forget the
: name) under them. Do I need extra insulation between the walls? I can
: even cover the entrance with hanging strips of plastic the way they
: have in some grocery store freezers.

Does anybody know if styrofoam is sufficiently wind- and water-proof
against harsh high velocity drafts or do I need to line it with
plastic?

Gail
September 29th 05, 08:19 PM
I would line it with plastic.
Gail
"Ajanta" > wrote in message
...
>: Two styrofoam coolers, one inside other, a hole cut out for entry/exit,
> : a layer of blankets with the microwavable heating "frisbee" (forget the
> : name) under them. Do I need extra insulation between the walls? I can
> : even cover the entrance with hanging strips of plastic the way they
> : have in some grocery store freezers.
>
> Does anybody know if styrofoam is sufficiently wind- and water-proof
> against harsh high velocity drafts or do I need to line it with
> plastic?

No More Retail
September 29th 05, 09:49 PM
Weird reply here what is winter I live in Florida

whayface
September 30th 05, 01:39 AM
If you place 2 together inside each other you could put a sheet of plastic between the 2
and that way it would stay in place.



http://members.aol.com/larrystark/

http://members.aol.com/larrystark/strays.htm




>I would line it with plastic.
>Gail

>>: Two styrofoam coolers, one inside other, a hole cut out for entry/exit,
>> : a layer of blankets with the microwavable heating "frisbee" (forget the
>> : name) under them. Do I need extra insulation between the walls? I can
>> : even cover the entrance with hanging strips of plastic the way they
>> : have in some grocery store freezers.
>>
>> Does anybody know if styrofoam is sufficiently wind- and water-proof
>> against harsh high velocity drafts or do I need to line it with
>> plastic?
>

ShirleyB
September 30th 05, 01:40 AM
Just one note on this. Styrafoam is extremely light. The wind might play havoc
with it. If the cat is inside it would probably be okay. But a high wind coming
up without the cat inside might blow it around/away.

Just my two cents!

ShirleyB, Rexie's Mom
<To Reply by email: remove 'nick'>

Pictures of His Majesty, Rex are at:
http://community.webshots.com/album/255873683SwWQZJ



Ajanta related the following on 9/29/2005 11:21 AM:
> : Two styrofoam coolers, one inside other, a hole cut out for entry/exit,
> : a layer of blankets with the microwavable heating "frisbee" (forget the
> : name) under them. Do I need extra insulation between the walls? I can
> : even cover the entrance with hanging strips of plastic the way they
> : have in some grocery store freezers.
>
> Does anybody know if styrofoam is sufficiently wind- and water-proof
> against harsh high velocity drafts or do I need to line it with
> plastic?

Ajanta
September 30th 05, 07:27 AM
whayface > wrote:

: If you place 2 together inside each other you could put a sheet of plastic
: between the 2 and that way it would stay in place.

If I put two, I can add some heavy stuff between them to make the whole
thing somewhat heavy.

-L.
September 30th 05, 07:36 AM
Ajanta wrote:
> whayface > wrote:
>
> : If you place 2 together inside each other you could put a sheet of plastic
> : between the 2 and that way it would stay in place.
>
> If I put two, I can add some heavy stuff between them to make the whole
> thing somewhat heavy.

You can fill the space between them with sand (relatively inexpensive)
and then duct-tape the openings so it doesn't come out. That will be a
natural insulation.

-L.

John F. Eldredge
October 1st 05, 03:02 PM
On Thu, 29 Sep 2005 07:59:54 GMT, Ajanta > wrote:

>Continuing about the stray/homeless cat I feed.
>
>I live in Midwest and we will have temperatures down to 20's and wind
>chills into single digits. I don't know what she did last winter.
>Actually I don't know if she would even need my help this winter. But I
>want to have some help for her on my porch should it be needed.
>
>I would be most grateful to hear ideas from those of you who have
>created warm corners to ferals.
>
>I have been reading around and lurked in the ng's as well and this is
>what I have so far:
>
>Two styrofoam coolers, one inside other, a hole cut out for entry/exit,
>a layer of blankets with the microwavable heating "frisbee" (forget the
>name) under them. Do I need extra insulation between the walls? I can
>even cover the entrance with hanging strips of plastic the way they
>have in some grocery store freezers.
>
>I have no building skills but this I can manage. It would also be
>affordable enough and if she doesn't use it, well, I'll have no
>regrets.
>
>I have outlets available but am afraid of using electrical devices, of
>causing a horrible harm with good intentions. However, if you have
>experience with something that is absolutely catproof (in your
>experience, not manufacturer's claim), I can consider it.
>
>All comments and suggestions appreciated.

Don't forget to weight the shelter down with a few bricks or stones on
top, so that it won't blow over while unoccupied. Kitty might be less
likely to use the shelter if the wind keeps moving it around.

--
John F. Eldredge --
PGP key available from http://pgp.mit.edu
"Reserve your right to think, for even to think wrongly is better
than not to think at all." -- Hypatia of Alexandria