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View Full Version : Re: Thermacare Wrap on Kami


Charlie Wilkes
October 4th 05, 05:40 AM
On 4 Oct 2005 01:35:09 GMT, "Brandy**Alexandre"
> wrote:

>I was using a thermacare wrap for my neck because my car was totalled
>with me in it a week ago, and when it started to fizzle out, I plopped
>it over Kami's shoulders. She seemed to really like it. I know she
>loves the heating pad to sleep on in the windert (with lots of padding
>in between) so I was wondering if anyone ever used the self-heating
>thermacare things on arthritic kitties.
>
>Comments?

I'm concerned about your injuries from the car accident. What
happened, anyway? Do you really need the wrap or did your lawyer tell
you to use it?

Cats are notorious for seeking heat where they can find it. I have
one of these 800-watt reflective infrared heaters -- very nice and
economical. Tweaker camps in front of it.

I have an exposed partition with the back of the refrigerator on one
side and a nook between the partition and my desk on the other. I
have set up a quilt adjacent to where the refrigerator vents its heat.
That is Tweaker's favorite spot when the heat lamp isn't on.

I would not hesitate to apply a thermacare pad to a cat as long as it
doesn't get too hot.

Charlie

Rhonda
October 4th 05, 06:31 AM
We've used "Snuggle Safe", which is a plastic frizbee-looking thing with
the gel inside. It's made for pets -- it's hard and they cannot puncture
it. We'd put it in the microwave every 10 hrs or so for our elderly CRF
kitty, and wrap it in a towel and put it in her bed. She loved it.

Rhonda

Brandy Alexandre wrote:

> I was using a thermacare wrap for my neck because my car was totalled
> with me in it a week ago, and when it started to fizzle out, I plopped
> it over Kami's shoulders. She seemed to really like it. I know she
> loves the heating pad to sleep on in the windert (with lots of padding
> in between) so I was wondering if anyone ever used the self-heating
> thermacare things on arthritic kitties.
>
> Comments?
>
>

October 4th 05, 06:34 PM
Nomen Nescio wrote:
> A) To get a drivers license you had to:
> 1) Be able to discuss with an examiner how the
> car actually worked (brakes, transmission, engine, etc)
> 2) Know how to read a map.
> 3) Be able to do a maximum performance stop.
> 4) Drive at the speed limit within 5% on a winding
> road.
> 5) Know how much less power your engine puts
> out in Denver than at Venice Beach.
> 6) Be able to recover from an "out of control" skid
> that was induced by an examiner who just fishtailed
> around a parking lot for a minute while your eyes were
> closed.
> 7) Be able to smoothly interact with all other traffic
> on the road.
> 8) Know where the dipstick is and how to check the
> oil level.
> 9) Know what your gas mileage was at a given speed.
> 10) Know the maximim speed that you can take a given
> radius turn at .
>
> AND ALSO:
> B) Had to prove you could still do that every 2 years.
> C) Had to have a doctor certify (every 2 years)
> that you were still physically capable of driving.
>
> And (assuming that the person that hit you was 100%
> at fault) they had their license automatically suspended
> for 1 - 5 years and had to prove they weren't negligent,
> in an appeal, to even have a chance of getting it
> reinstated.
>
> I would guess that would take at least 75% of the
> current drivers off the road and put them on a bus
> where they belong.
>
> And it would probably cost you less than $100 a year
> to fully insure your new car.

True. But we all have to spend thousands to get educated.