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bookbug2005
October 7th 05, 11:12 PM
Hi All,

I have a one year old neutered male cat who is totally offended by
closed doors. Due to our odd sleep schedules, we often nap in the
afternoon. When one of us lays down, we close the door because the
cat, Charley, is likely to come in and play around or talk. He's
really quite chatty. Although he has the whole run of the house and
others may still be up to keep him company, he must go to the napper's
door and meow, stick his paw under the door and rattle it, or leap for
the door knob trying to open it. This behavior usually gets him
stashed in another bedroom, and I usually go and lay down with him to
quiet him. Lately, even that hasn't helped. He pitches a hissy fit
that lasts around 15 minutes before finally resigning himself to the
inevitable. Of course, the latter wouldn't be necessary if he'd just
leave the napper's door alone.

Any ideas? Insight? All thoughts appreciated.
Thanks! Michelle

Gail
October 7th 05, 11:13 PM
I have two cats like this, also. They are indignant when someone closes them
out of a room. They are both spoiled rotten!!
Gail
"bookbug2005" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Hi All,
>
> I have a one year old neutered male cat who is totally offended by
> closed doors. Due to our odd sleep schedules, we often nap in the
> afternoon. When one of us lays down, we close the door because the
> cat, Charley, is likely to come in and play around or talk. He's
> really quite chatty. Although he has the whole run of the house and
> others may still be up to keep him company, he must go to the napper's
> door and meow, stick his paw under the door and rattle it, or leap for
> the door knob trying to open it. This behavior usually gets him
> stashed in another bedroom, and I usually go and lay down with him to
> quiet him. Lately, even that hasn't helped. He pitches a hissy fit
> that lasts around 15 minutes before finally resigning himself to the
> inevitable. Of course, the latter wouldn't be necessary if he'd just
> leave the napper's door alone.
>
> Any ideas? Insight? All thoughts appreciated.
> Thanks! Michelle
>

Space
October 7th 05, 11:16 PM
same here - i think with my cats it is a case of "the grass is always
greener", or a duvet is softer behind the closed door


"Gail" > wrote in message
ink.net...
> I have two cats like this, also. They are indignant when someone closes
them
> out of a room. They are both spoiled rotten!!
> Gail
> "bookbug2005" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> > Hi All,
> >
> > I have a one year old neutered male cat who is totally offended by
> > closed doors. Due to our odd sleep schedules, we often nap in the
> > afternoon. When one of us lays down, we close the door because the
> > cat, Charley, is likely to come in and play around or talk. He's
> > really quite chatty. Although he has the whole run of the house and
> > others may still be up to keep him company, he must go to the napper's
> > door and meow, stick his paw under the door and rattle it, or leap for
> > the door knob trying to open it. This behavior usually gets him
> > stashed in another bedroom, and I usually go and lay down with him to
> > quiet him. Lately, even that hasn't helped. He pitches a hissy fit
> > that lasts around 15 minutes before finally resigning himself to the
> > inevitable. Of course, the latter wouldn't be necessary if he'd just
> > leave the napper's door alone.
> >
> > Any ideas? Insight? All thoughts appreciated.
> > Thanks! Michelle
> >
>
>

Joe Canuck
October 7th 05, 11:24 PM
bookbug2005 wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> I have a one year old neutered male cat who is totally offended by
> closed doors. Due to our odd sleep schedules, we often nap in the
> afternoon. When one of us lays down, we close the door because the
> cat, Charley, is likely to come in and play around or talk. He's
> really quite chatty. Although he has the whole run of the house and
> others may still be up to keep him company, he must go to the napper's
> door and meow, stick his paw under the door and rattle it, or leap for
> the door knob trying to open it. This behavior usually gets him
> stashed in another bedroom, and I usually go and lay down with him to
> quiet him. Lately, even that hasn't helped. He pitches a hissy fit
> that lasts around 15 minutes before finally resigning himself to the
> inevitable. Of course, the latter wouldn't be necessary if he'd just
> leave the napper's door alone.
>
> Any ideas? Insight? All thoughts appreciated.
> Thanks! Michelle
>

Yes, I have one almost the same except for throwing the hissy fit. And
it is not just doors that humans are behind... it is ANY closed door.

The condition is incurable. :)

5cats
October 7th 05, 11:40 PM
bookbug2005 wrote:

> Hi All,
>
> I have a one year old neutered male cat who is totally offended by
> closed doors. Due to our odd sleep schedules, we often nap in the
> afternoon. When one of us lays down, we close the door because the
> cat, Charley, is likely to come in and play around or talk. He's
> really quite chatty. Although he has the whole run of the house and
> others may still be up to keep him company, he must go to the napper's
> door and meow, stick his paw under the door and rattle it, or leap for
> the door knob trying to open it. This behavior usually gets him
> stashed in another bedroom, and I usually go and lay down with him to
> quiet him. Lately, even that hasn't helped. He pitches a hissy fit
> that lasts around 15 minutes before finally resigning himself to the
> inevitable. Of course, the latter wouldn't be necessary if he'd just
> leave the napper's door alone.
>
> Any ideas? Insight? All thoughts appreciated.
> Thanks! Michelle

I have a spoiled brat named Charlie too. He's usually willing to lay
quietly on my stomach or on my feet if I nap during the day.

Maybe you could distract your Charley with food or catnip right before
you go to sleep? It might keep him occupied for a few minutes at least.

Barb
October 8th 05, 01:34 AM
Doors should not be closed in the home of a cat. Charley wants to come in
and he may talk for a while when you want to take a nap but his real plan is
to lie beside you or on you and take a nap, too.

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.

jmc
October 8th 05, 09:19 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Joe Canuck exclaimed (07-Oct-05 11:24 PM):
> bookbug2005 wrote:
>
>> Hi All,
>>
>> I have a one year old neutered male cat who is totally offended by
>> closed doors. Due to our odd sleep schedules, we often nap in the
>> afternoon. When one of us lays down, we close the door because the
>> cat, Charley, is likely to come in and play around or talk. He's
>> really quite chatty. Although he has the whole run of the house and
>> others may still be up to keep him company, he must go to the napper's
>> door and meow, stick his paw under the door and rattle it, or leap for
>> the door knob trying to open it. This behavior usually gets him
>> stashed in another bedroom, and I usually go and lay down with him to
>> quiet him. Lately, even that hasn't helped. He pitches a hissy fit
>> that lasts around 15 minutes before finally resigning himself to the
>> inevitable. Of course, the latter wouldn't be necessary if he'd just
>> leave the napper's door alone.
>>
>> Any ideas? Insight? All thoughts appreciated.
>> Thanks! Michelle
>>
>
> Yes, I have one almost the same except for throwing the hissy fit. And
> it is not just doors that humans are behind... it is ANY closed door.
>
> The condition is incurable. :)
>

Yea, mine's like that too. If you let her in to the room with the
closed door, and close the door behind her, usually she'll be
immediately wanting out :)

Fortunately she's a very quiet kitty, so doesn't throw hissy fits. I
remember a long time ago, she got locked in a closet somehow... I woke
in the night not knowing why... finally I realized I was hearing a very
polite, questioning little meow, like "hello? Is there anyone out
there? Can you let me out, please?"

If you react in any way to the hissy fit, it's reinforcing the behavior.
I'd lock him in a room with food, water, litter, far enough away that
the napper can nap, then completely ignore him till he quiets down. If
when let out, he goes immediately to the door to harrass the napper, he
goes right back into isolation. Do this consistently every time, he
should learn. Sometimes he'll need reinforcement.

jmc

Spot
October 8th 05, 02:52 PM
I have a calico who loves to sleep with you. It doesn't matter who it is or
what time it is she loves to cuddle up at the back of your legs and go to
sleep. It's just much easier to let the door open a crack so she can come in
and crawl up in bed than it is to listen to her fuss at the door.

The other two don't bother you at all in bed until it's night time and then
they slip in to sleep with us.

Celeste




"bookbug2005" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Hi All,
>
> I have a one year old neutered male cat who is totally offended by
> closed doors. Due to our odd sleep schedules, we often nap in the
> afternoon. When one of us lays down, we close the door because the
> cat, Charley, is likely to come in and play around or talk. He's
> really quite chatty. Although he has the whole run of the house and
> others may still be up to keep him company, he must go to the napper's
> door and meow, stick his paw under the door and rattle it, or leap for
> the door knob trying to open it. This behavior usually gets him
> stashed in another bedroom, and I usually go and lay down with him to
> quiet him. Lately, even that hasn't helped. He pitches a hissy fit
> that lasts around 15 minutes before finally resigning himself to the
> inevitable. Of course, the latter wouldn't be necessary if he'd just
> leave the napper's door alone.
>
> Any ideas? Insight? All thoughts appreciated.
> Thanks! Michelle
>

IBen Getiner
October 9th 05, 10:03 AM
bookbug2005 wrote:
> Hi All,
>
> I have a one year old neutered male cat who is totally offended by
> closed doors. Due to our odd sleep schedules, we often nap in the
> afternoon. When one of us lays down, we close the door because the
> cat, Charley, is likely to come in and play around or talk. He's
> really quite chatty. Although he has the whole run of the house and
> others may still be up to keep him company, he must go to the napper's
> door and meow, stick his paw under the door and rattle it, or leap for
> the door knob trying to open it. This behavior usually gets him
> stashed in another bedroom, and I usually go and lay down with him to
> quiet him. Lately, even that hasn't helped. He pitches a hissy fit
> that lasts around 15 minutes before finally resigning himself to the
> inevitable. Of course, the latter wouldn't be necessary if he'd just
> leave the napper's door alone.
>
> Any ideas? Insight? All thoughts appreciated.
> Thanks! Michelle

I know exactly where you're at, Mike... My advice is to put Charley in
his own room when you lay down. That's what we do. Chester knows it,
too. When he sees me go into the bath and he knows the wife is in the
bed, then he actually waits patiently at the entrance to hiz room for
me to come and say good nite to him. I have him on a schedule! No lie.
He actually waits for me to tell him to go to his room. He really tries
very hard to please me. But that's another story. One that you should
learn.
Put Charles in his own room. Deck it out with everything he might need.
Put the fan on when it's hot.. Lot's of food and water. Make sure the
window's open for his pleasure. But SEGREGATE his noise busy little azz
from YOU. He'z a simple animal, and you're trying to rest, for Christ's
sake!



IBen

bookbug2005
October 9th 05, 08:01 PM
At least I know that I'm not alone concerning Charley's fetish about
closed doors. :-) I suspect that our lack of a clear cut schedule
exacerbates the issue, as IBen pointed out. And lots of times, he is
segregated in a room with all of his needs met, except for his desire
to be out and about. However, I may try the catnip. And we are trying
very hard to ignore him when he throws a fit--but gee, he can be
persistent. I would be absolutely THRILLED if Charley would simply lay
down and take a nap with me. Nothing better than a cuddly kitty. But
Charley is just awfully busy.

Thanks for the commiserating and the ideas!
Michelle