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yogibug via CatKB.com
October 10th 05, 02:39 PM
My boyfriend's cat has started to poop outside its litterbox. The cat is
male, three almost four years old, and is neutered. It was just at the vet
about two weeks ago and he's healthy, so that isn't an issue. But his
roommate brought over a dog this weekend, which caused the cat to pretty much
be holed up in one room since he seemed a little put off buy this intruder.
The problem is now that the dog is gone, and the cat is still pooping in the
hallway. He also has not urinated at all in the past day or so. How can we
get the cat to stop going outside the litterbox? We have asked his roommate
to not bring the dog back.

5cats
October 10th 05, 04:03 PM
yogibug via CatKB.com wrote:

> My boyfriend's cat has started to poop outside its litterbox. The cat
> is male, three almost four years old, and is neutered. It was just at
> the vet about two weeks ago and he's healthy, so that isn't an issue.
> But his roommate brought over a dog this weekend, which caused the cat
> to pretty much be holed up in one room since he seemed a little put
> off buy this intruder. The problem is now that the dog is gone, and
> the cat is still pooping in the hallway. He also has not urinated at
> all in the past day or so. How can we get the cat to stop going
> outside the litterbox? We have asked his roommate to not bring the
> dog back.
>

Not urinating at all for over 24 hours is a not a good thing. Is it
possible that he's used some remote corner of the house where you haven't
detected pee yet? Urinary tract blockages can come on suddenly and the
cat really should be taken to a vet immediately.

Gail
October 10th 05, 04:06 PM
Place the cat in a room of his own for awhile with bed, water, food, and the
litter box (away from the food and water). He may need this to get back on
track. If he does not urinate soon, get him to a vet.
Gail
"yogibug via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> My boyfriend's cat has started to poop outside its litterbox. The cat is
> male, three almost four years old, and is neutered. It was just at the
> vet
> about two weeks ago and he's healthy, so that isn't an issue. But his
> roommate brought over a dog this weekend, which caused the cat to pretty
> much
> be holed up in one room since he seemed a little put off buy this
> intruder.
> The problem is now that the dog is gone, and the cat is still pooping in
> the
> hallway. He also has not urinated at all in the past day or so. How can
> we
> get the cat to stop going outside the litterbox? We have asked his
> roommate
> to not bring the dog back.

Wendy
October 10th 05, 05:10 PM
"yogibug via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> My boyfriend's cat has started to poop outside its litterbox. The cat is
> male, three almost four years old, and is neutered. It was just at the
> vet
> about two weeks ago and he's healthy, so that isn't an issue. But his
> roommate brought over a dog this weekend, which caused the cat to pretty
> much
> be holed up in one room since he seemed a little put off buy this
> intruder.
> The problem is now that the dog is gone, and the cat is still pooping in
> the
> hallway. He also has not urinated at all in the past day or so. How can
> we
> get the cat to stop going outside the litterbox? We have asked his
> roommate
> to not bring the dog back.

A lot of people think if their pet just saw the vet that there can't be any
urinary tract problem. I've never had my vet run a urine test as a matter of
course during the annual exam. Without that I don't know how a vet could
detect oncoming urinary tract problems if the animal was asymptomatic at the
time of the visit.

Not to say that that is the problem in this case but stress can trigger
health problems. I would be very concerned if the cat truly hasn't peed in
the last day or so. Blockages can come on very quickly in male cats and are
deadly if not taken care of promptly.

W

Topaz
October 10th 05, 06:04 PM
"Gail" > wrote in message
nk.net...
> Place the cat in a room of his own for awhile with bed, water, food, and
the
> litter box (away from the food and water). He may need this to get back on
> track. If he does not urinate soon, get him to a vet.

I second this. I have used confinement in situations like this with
success.

Also, it is a great idea to keep the dog away as it makes sense
that kittty might be marking if that is the only thing that has
changed around the house.

Phil P.
October 10th 05, 11:00 PM
"Wendy" > wrote in message
...
>
> "yogibug via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > My boyfriend's cat has started to poop outside its litterbox. The cat
is
> > male, three almost four years old, and is neutered. It was just at the
> > vet
> > about two weeks ago and he's healthy, so that isn't an issue. But his
> > roommate brought over a dog this weekend, which caused the cat to pretty
> > much
> > be holed up in one room since he seemed a little put off buy this
> > intruder.
> > The problem is now that the dog is gone, and the cat is still pooping in
> > the
> > hallway. He also has not urinated at all in the past day or so. How
can
> > we
> > get the cat to stop going outside the litterbox? We have asked his
> > roommate
> > to not bring the dog back.
>
> A lot of people think if their pet just saw the vet that there can't be
any
> urinary tract problem. I've never had my vet run a urine test as a matter
of
> course during the annual exam. Without that I don't know how a vet could
> detect oncoming urinary tract problems if the animal was asymptomatic at
the
> time of the visit.

That's true. Some vets include a USG and a dipstick for pH, blood, etc. as
part of the exam if he's also doing bloodwork, but seldom will a vet do a
microscopic exam of the urine for crystals. Just because the cat has acidic
urine at the time he's examined doesn't rule out the possibility of
crystals-- especially in cats that haven't urinated for awhile and might
have a urinary tract obstruction. Cats with a UTO often have no appetite and
don't eat because the backed up urine makes them feel sick. Not eating
acidifies the urine because bicarbonate isn't released as it is after
eating.

The bottom line is just because a cat was in perfect health two weeks ago or
even yesterday doesn't mean he can't have a problem now.



>
> Not to say that that is the problem in this case but stress can trigger
> health problems. I would be very concerned if the cat truly hasn't peed in
> the last day or so. Blockages can come on very quickly in male cats and
are
> deadly if not taken care of promptly.

Absolutely! A urinary tract obstruction can cause severe damage to the
urinary bladder and also produces a pathophysiologic state equivalent to
oliguric acute renal failure that can cause death if not treated
*immediately*.


Phil

John Doe
October 29th 05, 07:45 AM
"Phil P." > wrote:

....
> The bottom line is just because a cat was in perfect health two
> weeks ago or even yesterday doesn't mean he can't have a problem
> now.

So true, and so meaningless.

whitershadeofpale
October 29th 05, 08:05 AM
yogibug via CatKB.com wrote:
> My boyfriend's cat has started to poop outside its litterbox. The cat is
> male, three almost four years old, and is neutered. It was just at the vet
> about two weeks ago and he's healthy, so that isn't an issue. But his
> roommate brought over a dog this weekend, which caused the cat to pretty much
> be holed up in one room since he seemed a little put off buy this intruder.
> The problem is now that the dog is gone, and the cat is still pooping in the
> hallway. He also has not urinated at all in the past day or so. How can we
> get the cat to stop going outside the litterbox? We have asked his roommate
> to not bring the dog back.

hab ya tried moving the litterbox closer to the scene of the crimes

sounds like the cat is not sure if the dog is in the other room or not.

kitty is probably still smelling the dog, when he smells the dog, he
gets flashbacks.

Smell is extremely useful in remembering

cybercat
October 29th 05, 11:56 AM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
> "Phil P." > wrote:
>
> ...
> > The bottom line is just because a cat was in perfect health two
> > weeks ago or even yesterday doesn't mean he can't have a problem
> > now.
>
> So true, and so meaningless.

Huh? How can a statement that gets a sick cat to the vet
when he needs it be "meaningless?" What have you said today that was more
"meaningful" than that? What are you here for, J.D.?