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Chuck
October 18th 05, 08:14 PM
Does anyone have any knowledge about
mini cats?

I have a few abandoned cats that have
taken refuge in by backyard -- yes, I
feed them (cheap dry food).

A rather small female had a litter about 5-
6 mo. ago and 2 of them seem to be mini.

Both are female, one is a gray tabby, the
other is a light gray tabby with a white chest,
mouth area, and feet. Both are cute as a
button, sweet natured, and look normal in
every way (not dwarves) but stand only 6-7"
or so at the shoulder.

Any input?

Chuck

rpl
October 18th 05, 08:28 PM
Chuck wrote:
> Does anyone have any knowledge about
> mini cats?
>
> I have a few abandoned cats that have
> taken refuge in by backyard -- yes, I
> feed them (cheap dry food).
>
> A rather small female had a litter about 5-
> 6 mo. ago and 2 of them seem to be mini.
>
> Both are female, one is a gray tabby, the
> other is a light gray tabby with a white chest,
> mouth area, and feet. Both are cute as a
> button, sweet natured, and look normal in
> every way (not dwarves) but stand only 6-7"
> or so at the shoulder.

I don't think there's such a thing as a "mini" breed (or line) of
domestic cats. Some torties seem to be small but they're usually
shorthairs anyways so it can be hard to tell.

6-7" at the shoulder doesn't sound small for 6 mo. old... are the others
males ? 5-6 mo. is when their hormones kick in and they can bulk up
considerably.

Chuck
October 18th 05, 08:55 PM
rpl > wrote in message
...
> Chuck wrote:
> > Does anyone have any knowledge about
> > mini cats?
> >
> > I have a few abandoned cats that have
> > taken refuge in by backyard -- yes, I
> > feed them (cheap dry food).
> >
> > A rather small female had a litter about 5-
> > 6 mo. ago and 2 of them seem to be mini.
> >
> > Both are female, one is a gray tabby, the
> > other is a light gray tabby with a white chest,
> > mouth area, and feet. Both are cute as a
> > button, sweet natured, and look normal in
> > every way (not dwarves) but stand only 6-7"
> > or so at the shoulder.
>
> I don't think there's such a thing as a "mini" breed (or line) of
> domestic cats. Some torties seem to be small but they're usually
> shorthairs anyways so it can be hard to tell.
>
> 6-7" at the shoulder doesn't sound small for 6 mo. old... are the others
> males ? 5-6 mo. is when their hormones kick in and they can bulk up
> considerably.

The other cats in the litter seem more normal
in size (about 1 - 1 in. taller). One is a black
female, the other a black male.

I have a 2 yr old male tabby (neutered, from the
mom of the small female I referred to) that
stands 9" at the shoulder and is noticeably
smaller than any of the other cats I have (the
largest stands 12" at the shoulder).

The reason I ask, there is another mini male
(1 yr old and un-neutered) that stands 9". He
is pure gray, and his mom is the original mom
(a small-ish gray Persian-looking female). I was
wondering if it's possible to get a breed of mini
cats from these, or should I just find homes for
them and forget it?

Chuck

PawsForThought
October 18th 05, 09:57 PM
Chuck wrote:
> The reason I ask, there is another mini male
> (1 yr old and un-neutered) that stands 9". He
> is pure gray, and his mom is the original mom
> (a small-ish gray Persian-looking female). I was
> wondering if it's possible to get a breed of mini
> cats from these, or should I just find homes for
> them and forget it?

I would strongly urge you to have this cats fixed and then place them
in good homes. There is a so-called breed of cat, the name escapes me
now, that have been bred because of their short legs. To me, it seems
cruel to make a deformity or abnormality a "breed". The cats you have
just sound small.

Lauren

No More Retail
October 18th 05, 10:18 PM
It almost sounds like the cat has the problem stunted growth a form of
dwarfism caused by malnutrion if they are strays very good possibility. And
the idea of breeding the animals chuck is not very appealing. Take the cats
to a low cost spay and neuter center get their shots and everything and find
them a good and loving home. If you have trouble finding a center post the
general area that your are in. I can find one in the US usually with no
problem.

And the breed of mini cats are called tea cup cats and from what I
understand they do not have a normal life span and are extremely fragile to
it surroundings environment

Chuck
October 18th 05, 10:56 PM
No More Retail > wrote in message
om...
> It almost sounds like the cat has the problem stunted growth a form of
> dwarfism caused by malnutrion if they are strays very good possibility. And
> the idea of breeding the animals chuck is not very appealing. Take the cats
> to a low cost spay and neuter center get their shots and everything and find
> them a good and loving home. If you have trouble finding a center post the
> general area that your are in. I can find one in the US usually with no
> problem.
>
> And the breed of mini cats are called tea cup cats and from what I
> understand they do not have a normal life span and are extremely fragile to
> it surroundings environment
>

From what I've read already, dwarfism is
distinctive of short legs, with a normal body
size. This is not the case.

Malnutrition is not, in any way, a possibility.

I have read some stuff that would indicate
healthy, normal minicats seem to come from
small, Persian females-- as was pretty much
the case here. In this case, the genetic pool
seems to be quite diversified (the problem
with tea-cup cats is apparently their limited
gene pool).

They're just soooo cute! I thought they may
be breedable (not in a cage, though)!

Chuck

Chuck
October 18th 05, 11:00 PM
PawsForThought > wrote in message
oups.com...

Chuck wrote:
> The reason I ask, there is another mini male
> (1 yr old and un-neutered) that stands 9". He
> is pure gray, and his mom is the original mom
> (a small-ish gray Persian-looking female). I was
> wondering if it's possible to get a breed of mini
> cats from these, or should I just find homes for
> them and forget it?

I would strongly urge you to have this cats fixed and then place them
in good homes. There is a so-called breed of cat, the name escapes me
now, that have been bred because of their short legs. To me, it seems
cruel to make a deformity or abnormality a "breed". The cats you have
just sound small.

Lauren

---

Yes, quite small, normal looking, and really
cute!

I agree that breeding deformities is not a
good thing.

Chuck

Shadow Walker
October 19th 05, 12:55 AM
If these cats your feeding have not been to a vet and wormed then
malnutrition is a possibility. They can be suffering malnutrition just
enough to not get the nutrition they need to grow. that's why most wild born
cats are small. Take wild kittens away from their mother vet them, worm them
and they will get bigger than mom and dad. The next generation will be even
more normal domestic size. I have had to capture, tame, raise and remove
wild cats. They are usually smaller than your average house cat but don't
look like they are suffering from malnutrition until you see their gums,
compare weight and size, and look closely at their coats. Worms, internal
parasites, fleas, earmites the list goes on and on, how could they possibly
not have some kind of malnutrition going on?

I would suggest getting the females spayed very soon before they have more
kittens. They are the age for that and if they do get pregnant then they
really will not grow more. Children having children syndrome.

Gina

"Chuck" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Does anyone have any knowledge about
> mini cats?
>
> I have a few abandoned cats that have
> taken refuge in by backyard -- yes, I
> feed them (cheap dry food).
>
> A rather small female had a litter about 5-
> 6 mo. ago and 2 of them seem to be mini.
>
> Both are female, one is a gray tabby, the
> other is a light gray tabby with a white chest,
> mouth area, and feet. Both are cute as a
> button, sweet natured, and look normal in
> every way (not dwarves) but stand only 6-7"
> or so at the shoulder.
>
> Any input?
>
> Chuck
>
>

Chuck
October 19th 05, 08:11 PM
Shadow Walker > wrote in message
...
> If these cats your feeding have not been to a vet and wormed then
> malnutrition is a possibility. They can be suffering malnutrition just
> enough to not get the nutrition they need to grow. that's why most wild born
> cats are small. Take wild kittens away from their mother vet them, worm them
> and they will get bigger than mom and dad. The next generation will be even
> more normal domestic size. I have had to capture, tame, raise and remove
> wild cats. They are usually smaller than your average house cat but don't
> look like they are suffering from malnutrition until you see their gums,
> compare weight and size, and look closely at their coats. Worms, internal
> parasites, fleas, earmites the list goes on and on, how could they possibly
> not have some kind of malnutrition going on?
>
> I would suggest getting the females spayed very soon before they have more
> kittens. They are the age for that and if they do get pregnant then they
> really will not grow more. Children having children syndrome.
>
> Gina

Uh huh... and I was born yesterday, and haven't
had any experience with cats, both feral and
domestic for the last 50 or so years... that I
cannot recognize symptoms or anything else ITR--
only the big superior Ego's here have all the right
answers-- as was the case in the "oh no, the sky
is falling" replies when I asked if anyone had any
experience with bone growths (IRT my cat Maxi).

Than one cost me $125 for nothing-- as it turned
out, my deductions were correct in the first place.
Apparently my common-sense gut feelings seems
more applicable than the pejorative "oh no... bad
bad" judgments that seem to be so prevalent here.

In any event, I came here foolishly thinking I could
engage in a discussion IRT minicats-- a potentially
interesting subject-- not to get chided for imagined
misdeeds, or get unsolicited diagnosis on cat's
never seen by self appointed know-it-alls.

Silly me!

~C
Enjoy your flames...

No More Retail
October 19th 05, 09:00 PM
Well if you gut feeling was so right WHY did you do it well simple
answer you did not for sure if you were right. You did not waste $125 you
spent $125 to have peace of mind about a loved one. Money well spent and
worth the pain.

Silly us you described several problems got feed back about all of them.
Silly us for giving a care no matter what I still care and willing to help

Than you ask about another problem and get feed back and get prissy
about it. This is the usernet you will get opinions from all sorts. A cat
can be eating, look healthy and have a severe problem of malnutrition.
Unless you are a trained and certified vet not matter how much experience
you have YOU can not make a diagnoses. A cat may look healthy but how are
the cats gums, is the cat having correct stool movements, is the cats
belly tender, is the cat running a fever, is the cats' coat rough, does the
cat have a intense thirst, is the cat vomiting, is the cat wheezing or
unexplained choking, is the cat having fainting spells. You can not answer
those questions the cats according to you live in your back yard and a an
outside cat can have heartworms real easy it is spread by mosquitoes. Real
easy to prevent it simple once a month medication

And I have over 40 years with cats plus 20 years as a volunteer in shelters
and I know that if it ain't obvious have a pro check it out.

I believe I offered to find you a low cost vet if you let me know what
general area you lived in I can find out where no cost or low cost vet
service is or isn't. I can post home remedies for alot of aliments for
cats. I don't need to know what address just general area such as the
county and state

Dwarfism covers several aspect other than just stubby legs. the cat might
be smaller due to being a stray its mother might have been inbreeding for a
long time, the cat could have some nutrition problem. As for the other post
that benign cyst could have been cancer, a tumor a pocket of infection
there is so much stuff out there unless you are a trained vet all you can do
is guess. You got people opinions and experiences out here you made the
decision to do it but you lacked to tell us if you called the vet and asked
what it could be or not. And I will bet if you did the vet said come in it
could be a problem. Just my 50 cents

alt4
October 19th 05, 10:41 PM
Flames? Why, they accomplish nothing. I know what going without arthritis
medicine is like, I've had a torn rotator cuff that wasn't diagnosed for
months and arthritis medicine? They gave me Ibuprofen and said suck it up.
But let that go. I was wondering where you were because every so often a
deep grey male, not very tall comes by. I think he may be the same one you
mean if you're in Ohio.

--
"Other than telling us how to live, think,
marry, pray, vote, invest, educate our
children and now, die, I think the
Republicans have done a fine job of
getting government out of our personal
lives."
"Chuck" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Shadow Walker > wrote in message
> ...
>> If these cats your feeding have not been to a vet and wormed then
>> malnutrition is a possibility. They can be suffering malnutrition just
>> enough to not get the nutrition they need to grow. that's why most wild
>> born
>> cats are small. Take wild kittens away from their mother vet them, worm
>> them
>> and they will get bigger than mom and dad. The next generation will be
>> even
>> more normal domestic size. I have had to capture, tame, raise and remove
>> wild cats. They are usually smaller than your average house cat but don't
>> look like they are suffering from malnutrition until you see their gums,
>> compare weight and size, and look closely at their coats. Worms, internal
>> parasites, fleas, earmites the list goes on and on, how could they
>> possibly
>> not have some kind of malnutrition going on?
>>
>> I would suggest getting the females spayed very soon before they have
>> more
>> kittens. They are the age for that and if they do get pregnant then they
>> really will not grow more. Children having children syndrome.
>>
>> Gina
>
> Uh huh... and I was born yesterday, and haven't
> had any experience with cats, both feral and
> domestic for the last 50 or so years... that I
> cannot recognize symptoms or anything else ITR--
> only the big superior Ego's here have all the right
> answers-- as was the case in the "oh no, the sky
> is falling" replies when I asked if anyone had any
> experience with bone growths (IRT my cat Maxi).
>
> Than one cost me $125 for nothing-- as it turned
> out, my deductions were correct in the first place.
> Apparently my common-sense gut feelings seems
> more applicable than the pejorative "oh no... bad
> bad" judgments that seem to be so prevalent here.
>
> In any event, I came here foolishly thinking I could
> engage in a discussion IRT minicats-- a potentially
> interesting subject-- not to get chided for imagined
> misdeeds, or get unsolicited diagnosis on cat's
> never seen by self appointed know-it-alls.
>
> Silly me!
>
> ~C
> Enjoy your flames...
>
>
>

Chuck
October 20th 05, 12:36 AM
alt4 > wrote in message
...
> Flames? Why, they accomplish nothing. I know what going without arthritis
> medicine is like, I've had a torn rotator cuff that wasn't diagnosed for
> months and arthritis medicine? They gave me Ibuprofen and said suck it up.
> But let that go. I was wondering where you were because every so often a
> deep grey male, not very tall comes by. I think he may be the same one you
> mean if you're in Ohio.
>

Hi alt4,

Actually I'm out west...

Y'know I had a case of Ibuprofen poisoning
(I've had chronic spinal arthritus for about
15 years, but didn't retire until a few years
ago) before the cox inhibitors came along.
Now they tell me I'll get a heart attack from
those...

It seems one can't win for losing, eh?

~C


> --
> "Other than telling us how to live, think,
> marry, pray, vote, invest, educate our
> children and now, die, I think the
> Republicans have done a fine job of
> getting government out of our personal
> lives."
> "Chuck" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > Shadow Walker > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> If these cats your feeding have not been to a vet and wormed then
> >> malnutrition is a possibility. They can be suffering malnutrition just
> >> enough to not get the nutrition they need to grow. that's why most wild
> >> born
> >> cats are small. Take wild kittens away from their mother vet them, worm
> >> them
> >> and they will get bigger than mom and dad. The next generation will be
> >> even
> >> more normal domestic size. I have had to capture, tame, raise and remove
> >> wild cats. They are usually smaller than your average house cat but don't
> >> look like they are suffering from malnutrition until you see their gums,
> >> compare weight and size, and look closely at their coats. Worms, internal
> >> parasites, fleas, earmites the list goes on and on, how could they
> >> possibly
> >> not have some kind of malnutrition going on?
> >>
> >> I would suggest getting the females spayed very soon before they have
> >> more
> >> kittens. They are the age for that and if they do get pregnant then they
> >> really will not grow more. Children having children syndrome.
> >>
> >> Gina
> >
> > Uh huh... and I was born yesterday, and haven't
> > had any experience with cats, both feral and
> > domestic for the last 50 or so years... that I
> > cannot recognize symptoms or anything else ITR--
> > only the big superior Ego's here have all the right
> > answers-- as was the case in the "oh no, the sky
> > is falling" replies when I asked if anyone had any
> > experience with bone growths (IRT my cat Maxi).
> >
> > Than one cost me $125 for nothing-- as it turned
> > out, my deductions were correct in the first place.
> > Apparently my common-sense gut feelings seems
> > more applicable than the pejorative "oh no... bad
> > bad" judgments that seem to be so prevalent here.
> >
> > In any event, I came here foolishly thinking I could
> > engage in a discussion IRT minicats-- a potentially
> > interesting subject-- not to get chided for imagined
> > misdeeds, or get unsolicited diagnosis on cat's
> > never seen by self appointed know-it-alls.
> >
> > Silly me!
> >
> > ~C
> > Enjoy your flames...
> >
> >
> >
>
>

Chuck
October 20th 05, 01:41 AM
No More Retail > wrote in message
om...
> Well if you gut feeling was so right WHY did you do it well simple
> answer you did not for sure if you were right. You did not waste $125 you
> spent $125 to have peace of mind about a loved one. Money well spent and
> worth the pain.
>
> Silly us you described several problems got feed back about all of them.
> Silly us for giving a care no matter what I still care and willing to help
>
> Than you ask about another problem and get feed back and get prissy
> about it. This is the usernet you will get opinions from all sorts. A cat
> can be eating, look healthy and have a severe problem of malnutrition.
> Unless you are a trained and certified vet not matter how much experience
> you have YOU can not make a diagnoses. A cat may look healthy but how are
> the cats gums, is the cat having correct stool movements, is the cats
> belly tender, is the cat running a fever, is the cats' coat rough, does the
> cat have a intense thirst, is the cat vomiting, is the cat wheezing or
> unexplained choking, is the cat having fainting spells. You can not answer
> those questions the cats according to you live in your back yard and a an
> outside cat can have heartworms real easy it is spread by mosquitoes. Real
> easy to prevent it simple once a month medication
>
> And I have over 40 years with cats plus 20 years as a volunteer in shelters
> and I know that if it ain't obvious have a pro check it out.

"cats gums, is the cat having correct stool movements, is the cats
belly tender, is the cat running a fever, is the cats' coat rough, does the
cat have a intense thirst, is the cat vomiting, is the cat wheezing or
unexplained choking, is the cat having fainting spells"

Those are all observables-- your 40 years
should have taught you that. Perhaps you
mistakenly believe I treat the "outsiders" like
hobos, or the like. Not so-- I pay as much
attention, and give them as much love and
care (including neutering and shots if I can
catch them) as I do the "insiders" ... and yes,
I do find homes for them if I can-- having
them killed is never an option.

I held-off neutering the little ones, as I was
(still am) curious about breeding-- no help
here, though!

The problem is, I have money concerns now,
that were not there before my wife's breast
cancer, which has been a financial drain--
especially since I'm retired and she was still
working-- but due to lymphoma as a result
of surgery (lymph node removal) she can no
longer do so... and health insurance is a joke!

>
> I believe I offered to find you a low cost vet if you let me know what
> general area you lived in I can find out where no cost or low cost vet
> service is or isn't. I can post home remedies for alot of aliments for
> cats. I don't need to know what address just general area such as the
> county and state
>
> Dwarfism covers several aspect other than just stubby legs. the cat might
> be smaller due to being a stray its mother might have been inbreeding for a
> long time, the cat could have some nutrition problem. As for the other post
> that benign cyst could have been cancer, a tumor a pocket of infection
> there is so much stuff out there unless you are a trained vet all you can do
> is guess.

The nice thing about the net, is one can
research just about anything. It did not
take long to learn about such things as
Fibrosarcoma, Extraskelital
osteosarcoma, Squamous cell carcinoma,
Feline parosteal and osteophytes, et al,
plus see the x-rays and PET scans, then
read all about their differing symptoms,
characteristics, and physiologies.

From that, I had a good Idea it was likely
benign. From the posts, I thought I had
missed something. My vet had confirmed I
had not.

The point of my post being: I did not ask for
advice, just other folks experiences in that
regard-- that which I did not get.

In any event, I did not see a post where
you offered to find a low cost vet -- just a lot
of scary stuff like "something beyond belief
wrong..."

Perhaps you're just being a little ****y as a
result of my pointing out the deficiencies in
your HTML post...

~C

Lesley
October 20th 05, 01:51 PM
There is a so-called breed of cat, the name escapes me
> now, that have been bred because of their short legs.

I think they're called "Munchkins" and they have a normal body but
shortened limbs ie they are like the form of Dwarfism in Humans called
Androplasic dwarfism

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

Democrats SUCK
October 20th 05, 11:43 PM
**** YOU DEMOCREEPS

John Kerry = Loser

Tony P.
October 21st 05, 02:56 AM
In article >, says...
> **** YOU DEMOCREEPS
>
> John Kerry = Loser

Oh yes, lets see. $50 billion in cuts to safety net programs. $70
billion in tax cuts for the people who need it least.

Sure, Republicans are good for us. Of course if they hadn't been
hijacked by the nutcases of the religious right I might be a little less
sarcastic.

Democrats SUCK
October 21st 05, 03:10 AM
"Tony P." > wrote in message
. ..
> In article >, says...



>> **** YOU DEMOCREEPS
>>
>> John Kerry = Loser
>

Shadow Walker
October 21st 05, 02:48 PM
I am not flaming you, just stating the facts. Nothing I posted was to be
insulting to your experiences and or beliefs. As for growths on any animal,
cat or human if you want to know if it's good or bad it should be checked
out just in case. That's not an opinion that's a scientific truth. As for
ego I don't have one of those I can not afford one.
Gina

"Chuck" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Shadow Walker > wrote in message
> ...
>> If these cats your feeding have not been to a vet and wormed then
>> malnutrition is a possibility. They can be suffering malnutrition just
>> enough to not get the nutrition they need to grow. that's why most wild
>> born
>> cats are small. Take wild kittens away from their mother vet them, worm
>> them
>> and they will get bigger than mom and dad. The next generation will be
>> even
>> more normal domestic size. I have had to capture, tame, raise and remove
>> wild cats. They are usually smaller than your average house cat but don't
>> look like they are suffering from malnutrition until you see their gums,
>> compare weight and size, and look closely at their coats. Worms, internal
>> parasites, fleas, earmites the list goes on and on, how could they
>> possibly
>> not have some kind of malnutrition going on?
>>
>> I would suggest getting the females spayed very soon before they have
>> more
>> kittens. They are the age for that and if they do get pregnant then they
>> really will not grow more. Children having children syndrome.
>>
>> Gina
>
> Uh huh... and I was born yesterday, and haven't
> had any experience with cats, both feral and
> domestic for the last 50 or so years... that I
> cannot recognize symptoms or anything else ITR--
> only the big superior Ego's here have all the right
> answers-- as was the case in the "oh no, the sky
> is falling" replies when I asked if anyone had any
> experience with bone growths (IRT my cat Maxi).
>
> Than one cost me $125 for nothing-- as it turned
> out, my deductions were correct in the first place.
> Apparently my common-sense gut feelings seems
> more applicable than the pejorative "oh no... bad
> bad" judgments that seem to be so prevalent here.
>
> In any event, I came here foolishly thinking I could
> engage in a discussion IRT minicats-- a potentially
> interesting subject-- not to get chided for imagined
> misdeeds, or get unsolicited diagnosis on cat's
> never seen by self appointed know-it-alls.
>
> Silly me!
>
> ~C
> Enjoy your flames...
>
>
>

whitershadeofpale
October 21st 05, 04:27 PM
This is just a quick theory on your mini cats.

See how the women in the southern states are taller, thicker, more
robust? It is because of the humidity. A simple scientific fact.
Especially around Baton Rouge. (The Natives that is)

Sooo...Im thinking...these cats have been dwarfed by constant
dehydration...and seeing the nuts don't fall too far from the
tree...woo haha (don't say it)...but uh...

sure..just soak them in water, they will grow to the right size a
couple of days or so...

:)


Chuck wrote:
> Does anyone have any knowledge about
> mini cats?
>
> I have a few abandoned cats that have
> taken refuge in by backyard -- yes, I
> feed them (cheap dry food).
>
> A rather small female had a litter about 5-
> 6 mo. ago and 2 of them seem to be mini.
>
> Both are female, one is a gray tabby, the
> other is a light gray tabby with a white chest,
> mouth area, and feet. Both are cute as a
> button, sweet natured, and look normal in
> every way (not dwarves) but stand only 6-7"
> or so at the shoulder.
>
> Any input?
>
> Chuck

rpl
October 21st 05, 04:40 PM
whitershadeofpale wrote:
> This is just a quick theory on your mini cats.
>
> See how the women in the southern states are taller, thicker, more
> robust? It is because of the humidity. A simple scientific fact.
> Especially around Baton Rouge. (The Natives that is)
>
> Sooo...Im thinking...these cats have been dwarfed by constant
> dehydration...and seeing the nuts don't fall too far from the
> tree...woo haha (don't say it)...but uh...
>
> sure..just soak them in water, they will grow to the right size a
> couple of days or so...


but don't do it after midnight.





>
> :)
>
>
> Chuck wrote:
>> Does anyone have any knowledge about
>> mini cats?
>>
>> I have a few abandoned cats that have
>> taken refuge in by backyard -- yes, I
>> feed them (cheap dry food).
>>
>> A rather small female had a litter about 5-
>> 6 mo. ago and 2 of them seem to be mini.
>>
>> Both are female, one is a gray tabby, the
>> other is a light gray tabby with a white chest,
>> mouth area, and feet. Both are cute as a
>> button, sweet natured, and look normal in
>> every way (not dwarves) but stand only 6-7"
>> or so at the shoulder.
>>
>> Any input?
>>
>> Chuck
>

Chuck
October 21st 05, 10:53 PM
Gina dear,

I was not asserting that you flamed me. I
was simply expecting flames to occur, since
that seems to be the normal response to an
honest opinion on Usenet.

Again, my point was: I was looking for other's
experiences IRT bone lumps, not opinions or
unsolicited diagnosis-- especially, given that I
had researched bone lumps prior to posting.

Since I failed to make that clear, the fault is
partly mine, and I accept whatever degree of
responsibility is due.

IRT mini-cats, my expectations were the
same, and I also did some research there
as well, though the conclusions were more
varied.

I did take some offense to the inference
that I did not take care of animals responsibly--
feral or otherwise-- or I was unable to
recognize ill or undernourished cats. Perhaps
I was a bit hasty in my conclusions. To that, I
apologize as I know your intentions were good.

Have a nice one...

~C

BTW, little Hoagie was brought inside when he
was 3 mo. old. He was small, but we gave it no
thought. The vet said he was healthy and well
nourished (just weaned). In fact now, he may be
a bit 'plump', but he looks like a kitten next to big
Butchie... (whom he adores)... :)

Shadow Walker > wrote in message
...
> I am not flaming you, just stating the facts. Nothing I posted was to be
> insulting to your experiences and or beliefs. As for growths on any animal,
> cat or human if you want to know if it's good or bad it should be checked
> out just in case. That's not an opinion that's a scientific truth. As for
> ego I don't have one of those I can not afford one.
> Gina
>
> "Chuck" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > Shadow Walker > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> If these cats your feeding have not been to a vet and wormed then
> >> malnutrition is a possibility. They can be suffering malnutrition just
> >> enough to not get the nutrition they need to grow. that's why most wild
> >> born
> >> cats are small. Take wild kittens away from their mother vet them, worm
> >> them
> >> and they will get bigger than mom and dad. The next generation will be
> >> even
> >> more normal domestic size. I have had to capture, tame, raise and remove
> >> wild cats. They are usually smaller than your average house cat but don't
> >> look like they are suffering from malnutrition until you see their gums,
> >> compare weight and size, and look closely at their coats. Worms, internal
> >> parasites, fleas, earmites the list goes on and on, how could they
> >> possibly
> >> not have some kind of malnutrition going on?
> >>
> >> I would suggest getting the females spayed very soon before they have
> >> more
> >> kittens. They are the age for that and if they do get pregnant then they
> >> really will not grow more. Children having children syndrome.
> >>
> >> Gina
> >
> > Uh huh... and I was born yesterday, and haven't
> > had any experience with cats, both feral and
> > domestic for the last 50 or so years... that I
> > cannot recognize symptoms or anything else ITR--
> > only the big superior Ego's here have all the right
> > answers-- as was the case in the "oh no, the sky
> > is falling" replies when I asked if anyone had any
> > experience with bone growths (IRT my cat Maxi).
> >
> > Than one cost me $125 for nothing-- as it turned
> > out, my deductions were correct in the first place.
> > Apparently my common-sense gut feelings seems
> > more applicable than the pejorative "oh no... bad
> > bad" judgments that seem to be so prevalent here.
> >
> > In any event, I came here foolishly thinking I could
> > engage in a discussion IRT minicats-- a potentially
> > interesting subject-- not to get chided for imagined
> > misdeeds, or get unsolicited diagnosis on cat's
> > never seen by self appointed know-it-alls.
> >
> > Silly me!
> >
> > ~C
> > Enjoy your flames...
> >
> >
> >
>
>

Shadow Walker
October 22nd 05, 04:30 AM
I am sorry that I misunderstood your post. LOL It just started off with...

<snip>
Uh huh... and I was born yesterday,
<snip>
<snip>
not to get chided for imagined
misdeeds, or get unsolicited diagnosis on cat's
never seen by self appointed know-it-alls.

Silly me!

~C
Enjoy your flames...
<snip>

and ended in that. I'm sorry if you feel others said or did things that
irritated you. I for one did not intend to irritate you. I kind of thought
it was funny the beginning of that message. I smiled and hurried to read the
rest. Then I realized you were feeling kinda cornered. That I did not think
was funny.

Thank you and hope you continue your feral work,
Gina


"Chuck" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Gina dear,
>
> I was not asserting that you flamed me. I
> was simply expecting flames to occur, since
> that seems to be the normal response to an
> honest opinion on Usenet.
>
> Again, my point was: I was looking for other's
> experiences IRT bone lumps, not opinions or
> unsolicited diagnosis-- especially, given that I
> had researched bone lumps prior to posting.
>
> Since I failed to make that clear, the fault is
> partly mine, and I accept whatever degree of
> responsibility is due.
>
> IRT mini-cats, my expectations were the
> same, and I also did some research there
> as well, though the conclusions were more
> varied.
>
> I did take some offense to the inference
> that I did not take care of animals responsibly--
> feral or otherwise-- or I was unable to
> recognize ill or undernourished cats. Perhaps
> I was a bit hasty in my conclusions. To that, I
> apologize as I know your intentions were good.
>
> Have a nice one...
>
> ~C
>
> BTW, little Hoagie was brought inside when he
> was 3 mo. old. He was small, but we gave it no
> thought. The vet said he was healthy and well
> nourished (just weaned). In fact now, he may be
> a bit 'plump', but he looks like a kitten next to big
> Butchie... (whom he adores)... :)
>
> Shadow Walker > wrote in message
> ...
>> I am not flaming you, just stating the facts. Nothing I posted was to be
>> insulting to your experiences and or beliefs. As for growths on any
>> animal,
>> cat or human if you want to know if it's good or bad it should be checked
>> out just in case. That's not an opinion that's a scientific truth. As for
>> ego I don't have one of those I can not afford one.
>> Gina
>>
>> "Chuck" > wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>> > Shadow Walker > wrote in message
>> > ...
>> >> If these cats your feeding have not been to a vet and wormed then
>> >> malnutrition is a possibility. They can be suffering malnutrition just
>> >> enough to not get the nutrition they need to grow. that's why most
>> >> wild
>> >> born
>> >> cats are small. Take wild kittens away from their mother vet them,
>> >> worm
>> >> them
>> >> and they will get bigger than mom and dad. The next generation will be
>> >> even
>> >> more normal domestic size. I have had to capture, tame, raise and
>> >> remove
>> >> wild cats. They are usually smaller than your average house cat but
>> >> don't
>> >> look like they are suffering from malnutrition until you see their
>> >> gums,
>> >> compare weight and size, and look closely at their coats. Worms,
>> >> internal
>> >> parasites, fleas, earmites the list goes on and on, how could they
>> >> possibly
>> >> not have some kind of malnutrition going on?
>> >>
>> >> I would suggest getting the females spayed very soon before they have
>> >> more
>> >> kittens. They are the age for that and if they do get pregnant then
>> >> they
>> >> really will not grow more. Children having children syndrome.
>> >>
>> >> Gina
>> >
>> > Uh huh... and I was born yesterday, and haven't
>> > had any experience with cats, both feral and
>> > domestic for the last 50 or so years... that I
>> > cannot recognize symptoms or anything else ITR--
>> > only the big superior Ego's here have all the right
>> > answers-- as was the case in the "oh no, the sky
>> > is falling" replies when I asked if anyone had any
>> > experience with bone growths (IRT my cat Maxi).
>> >
>> > Than one cost me $125 for nothing-- as it turned
>> > out, my deductions were correct in the first place.
>> > Apparently my common-sense gut feelings seems
>> > more applicable than the pejorative "oh no... bad
>> > bad" judgments that seem to be so prevalent here.
>> >
>> > In any event, I came here foolishly thinking I could
>> > engage in a discussion IRT minicats-- a potentially
>> > interesting subject-- not to get chided for imagined
>> > misdeeds, or get unsolicited diagnosis on cat's
>> > never seen by self appointed know-it-alls.
>> >
>> > Silly me!
>> >
>> > ~C
>> > Enjoy your flames...
>> >
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>

cybercat
October 22nd 05, 04:55 AM
"Shadow Walker" > wrote in message
...
>I am sorry that I misunderstood your post. LOL It just started off with...
>
> <snip>
> Uh huh... and I was born yesterday,
> <snip>
> <snip>
> not to get chided for imagined
> misdeeds, or get unsolicited diagnosis on cat's
> never seen by self appointed know-it-alls.
>
> Silly me!
>
> ~C
> Enjoy your flames...
> <snip>
>
> and ended in that. I'm sorry if you feel others said or did things that
> irritated you. I for one did not intend to irritate you. I kind of thought
> it was funny the beginning of that message. I smiled and hurried to read
> the rest. Then I realized you were feeling kinda cornered. That I did not
> think was funny.
>
> Thank you and hope you continue your feral work,
> Gina
>

Well, Gina, you are a class act. Stick around.

Chuck
October 22nd 05, 08:27 PM
Hi Gina...

Thank you.

Yes, I tend to be a bit "overly" blunt at times...

But, hey, at least I'm honest... and do have a
good heart, despite the rough exterior.

Apparently, I have a big neon sign on my
forehead (viewable only by l'il critters) that
says "sucker for a hard luck story..." :)

I think it all started when I was a kid: after
WWII we had 40 acres of oranges in the
Santa Rosa Valley in So. California. One
day, while irrigating, my dad handed me a
shovel and told me to kill the gophers as
the water forced them out of their flooded
burrows.

One did come out, all wet and bedraggled,
and I raised my shovel. But about then, I
looked into the little critters eyes and it
seemed to be saying to me, "please don't
kill me". I put down the shovel and let it
scurry away. I'll never forget that!

Ciao

~C

Shadow Walker > wrote in message
...
> I am sorry that I misunderstood your post. LOL It just started off with...
>
> <snip>
> Uh huh... and I was born yesterday,
> <snip>
> <snip>
> not to get chided for imagined
> misdeeds, or get unsolicited diagnosis on cat's
> never seen by self appointed know-it-alls.
>
> Silly me!
>
> ~C
> Enjoy your flames...
> <snip>
>
> and ended in that. I'm sorry if you feel others said or did things that
> irritated you. I for one did not intend to irritate you. I kind of thought
> it was funny the beginning of that message. I smiled and hurried to read the
> rest. Then I realized you were feeling kinda cornered. That I did not think
> was funny.
>
> Thank you and hope you continue your feral work,
> Gina
>
>
> "Chuck" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > Gina dear,
> >
> > I was not asserting that you flamed me. I
> > was simply expecting flames to occur, since
> > that seems to be the normal response to an
> > honest opinion on Usenet.
> >
> > Again, my point was: I was looking for other's
> > experiences IRT bone lumps, not opinions or
> > unsolicited diagnosis-- especially, given that I
> > had researched bone lumps prior to posting.
> >
> > Since I failed to make that clear, the fault is
> > partly mine, and I accept whatever degree of
> > responsibility is due.
> >
> > IRT mini-cats, my expectations were the
> > same, and I also did some research there
> > as well, though the conclusions were more
> > varied.
> >
> > I did take some offense to the inference
> > that I did not take care of animals responsibly--
> > feral or otherwise-- or I was unable to
> > recognize ill or undernourished cats. Perhaps
> > I was a bit hasty in my conclusions. To that, I
> > apologize as I know your intentions were good.
> >
> > Have a nice one...
> >
> > ~C
> >
> > BTW, little Hoagie was brought inside when he
> > was 3 mo. old. He was small, but we gave it no
> > thought. The vet said he was healthy and well
> > nourished (just weaned). In fact now, he may be
> > a bit 'plump', but he looks like a kitten next to big
> > Butchie... (whom he adores)... :)
> >
> > Shadow Walker > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> I am not flaming you, just stating the facts. Nothing I posted was to be
> >> insulting to your experiences and or beliefs. As for growths on any
> >> animal,
> >> cat or human if you want to know if it's good or bad it should be checked
> >> out just in case. That's not an opinion that's a scientific truth. As for
> >> ego I don't have one of those I can not afford one.
> >> Gina
> >>
> >> "Chuck" > wrote in message
> >> news:[email protected]
> >> > Shadow Walker > wrote in message
> >> > ...
> >> >> If these cats your feeding have not been to a vet and wormed then
> >> >> malnutrition is a possibility. They can be suffering malnutrition just
> >> >> enough to not get the nutrition they need to grow. that's why most
> >> >> wild
> >> >> born
> >> >> cats are small. Take wild kittens away from their mother vet them,
> >> >> worm
> >> >> them
> >> >> and they will get bigger than mom and dad. The next generation will be
> >> >> even
> >> >> more normal domestic size. I have had to capture, tame, raise and
> >> >> remove
> >> >> wild cats. They are usually smaller than your average house cat but
> >> >> don't
> >> >> look like they are suffering from malnutrition until you see their
> >> >> gums,
> >> >> compare weight and size, and look closely at their coats. Worms,
> >> >> internal
> >> >> parasites, fleas, earmites the list goes on and on, how could they
> >> >> possibly
> >> >> not have some kind of malnutrition going on?
> >> >>
> >> >> I would suggest getting the females spayed very soon before they have
> >> >> more
> >> >> kittens. They are the age for that and if they do get pregnant then
> >> >> they
> >> >> really will not grow more. Children having children syndrome.
> >> >>
> >> >> Gina
> >> >
> >> > Uh huh... and I was born yesterday, and haven't
> >> > had any experience with cats, both feral and
> >> > domestic for the last 50 or so years... that I
> >> > cannot recognize symptoms or anything else ITR--
> >> > only the big superior Ego's here have all the right
> >> > answers-- as was the case in the "oh no, the sky
> >> > is falling" replies when I asked if anyone had any
> >> > experience with bone growths (IRT my cat Maxi).
> >> >
> >> > Than one cost me $125 for nothing-- as it turned
> >> > out, my deductions were correct in the first place.
> >> > Apparently my common-sense gut feelings seems
> >> > more applicable than the pejorative "oh no... bad
> >> > bad" judgments that seem to be so prevalent here.
> >> >
> >> > In any event, I came here foolishly thinking I could
> >> > engage in a discussion IRT minicats-- a potentially
> >> > interesting subject-- not to get chided for imagined
> >> > misdeeds, or get unsolicited diagnosis on cat's
> >> > never seen by self appointed know-it-alls.
> >> >
> >> > Silly me!
> >> >
> >> > ~C
> >> > Enjoy your flames...
> >> >
> >> >
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>

PawsForThought
October 23rd 05, 12:07 AM
Lesley wrote:
> There is a so-called breed of cat, the name escapes me
> > now, that have been bred because of their short legs.
>
> I think they're called "Munchkins" and they have a normal body but
> shortened limbs ie they are like the form of Dwarfism in Humans called
> Androplasic dwarfism
>
> Lesley
>
> Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

Thanks, Lesley, that's the one I was thinking of.

Lauren