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5cats
October 19th 05, 04:37 PM
One of my cats apparently has allergies. I recall being told years ago
that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some things
that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very specific.

Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages small enough for
a cat?

Wendy
October 19th 05, 05:29 PM
"5cats" > wrote in message
...
> One of my cats apparently has allergies. I recall being told years ago
> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some things
> that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
> specific.
>
> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
> human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages small enough
> for
> a cat?
>

One of my previous fosters had upper respiratory problems that the vet
treated by giving her benedryl. I'm not sure of the dosage but it was
available in capsules because the adoptive mom had problems giving the cat
the liquid (she hated the taste) but was able to pill the kitty. The
benedryl finally cleared up the snotty nose and weepy eyes.

I love it when the adoptive mom's keep me up to date on my fosters :o)

W

Phil P.
October 19th 05, 10:18 PM
"5cats" > wrote in message
...
> One of my cats apparently has allergies.

What kind of allergies?


I recall being told years ago
> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some things
> that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
specific.

> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
> human OTC antihistamines off-label?


Yup. The most common antihistamine used in cats is cyproheptadine
(Periactin). Along with antihistamine/antipuritic effects, it's also an
effective appetite stimulant and its also used in controlling urine
spraying.

Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) is also sometimes used in cats before
vaccinations to prevent reactions to the vaccine.

Antihistamines also have a mild sedative effect in cats.

How do you get dosages small enough for
> a cat?

Cut the pills in half or quarters. The 4 mg tablets are scored for easy
cutting.

cybercat
October 19th 05, 11:31 PM
"5cats" > wrote in message
...
> One of my cats apparently has allergies. I recall being told years ago
> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some things
> that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
> specific.
>
> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
> human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages small enough
> for
> a cat?
>

I just went through this with my kitty who has allergies. Please call
your own vet to verify this--but my vet told me to give my cat
Chlortrimeton (that is the brand name but there is a generic). It comes
in 4 mg tablets, and he said I could give her 2 mgs every twelve hours.
I have a pill cutter and cut them in half. This is a 7-lb cat, and she is
on no other medications except quarterly Depo Medrol shots.
Again, do call your vet to verify that this is okay for your cat.

Also: work on removing the allergens.

5cats
October 20th 05, 12:56 AM
cybercat wrote:

>
> "5cats" > wrote in message
> ...
>> One of my cats apparently has allergies. I recall being told years
ago
>> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
things
>> that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
>> specific.
>>
>> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
>> human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages small
enough
>> for
>> a cat?
>>
>
> I just went through this with my kitty who has allergies. Please call
> your own vet to verify this--but my vet told me to give my cat
> Chlortrimeton (that is the brand name but there is a generic). It comes
> in 4 mg tablets, and he said I could give her 2 mgs every twelve hours.
> I have a pill cutter and cut them in half. This is a 7-lb cat, and she
is
> on no other medications except quarterly Depo Medrol shots.
> Again, do call your vet to verify that this is okay for your cat.
>
> Also: work on removing the allergens.
>

I have allergies myself and take benedryl or chlortrimeton (generic
versions). Both put me to sleep so I take them only at night.
Is your cat sleeping more now? 2mg sounds like a lot since the human dose
is 4mg every 6 hours.

Paul M. Cook
October 20th 05, 01:05 AM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
...
>
> "5cats" > wrote in message
> ...
> > One of my cats apparently has allergies.
>
> What kind of allergies?
>
>
> I recall being told years ago
> > that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some things
> > that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
> specific.
>
> > Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
> > human OTC antihistamines off-label?
>
>
> Yup. The most common antihistamine used in cats is cyproheptadine
> (Periactin). Along with antihistamine/antipuritic effects, it's also an
> effective appetite stimulant and its also used in controlling urine
> spraying.
>
> Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) is also sometimes used in cats before
> vaccinations to prevent reactions to the vaccine.
>
> Antihistamines also have a mild sedative effect in cats.
>
> How do you get dosages small enough for
> > a cat?
>
> Cut the pills in half or quarters. The 4 mg tablets are scored for easy
> cutting.


Phil, I think it important to add that cyproheptadine can have a very strong
and long lasting sedative effect on cats. I've had two cats on it and even
at 1/4 dosage they are zonked for 2 days. Plus, at that dosage it seems to
have no appetite stimulating benefit. It needs to be administered
cautiously and IMO starting at a quarter the dose the vet prescribes. It's
downright scary to see the effect it can have on a cat. I thought mine
would never wake up.

Paul

cybercat
October 20th 05, 01:28 AM
"5cats" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
>
>>
>> "5cats" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> One of my cats apparently has allergies. I recall being told years
> ago
>>> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
> things
>>> that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
>>> specific.
>>>
>>> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
>>> human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages small
> enough
>>> for
>>> a cat?
>>>
>>
>> I just went through this with my kitty who has allergies. Please call
>> your own vet to verify this--but my vet told me to give my cat
>> Chlortrimeton (that is the brand name but there is a generic). It comes
>> in 4 mg tablets, and he said I could give her 2 mgs every twelve hours.
>> I have a pill cutter and cut them in half. This is a 7-lb cat, and she
> is
>> on no other medications except quarterly Depo Medrol shots.
>> Again, do call your vet to verify that this is okay for your cat.
>>
>> Also: work on removing the allergens.
>>
>
> I have allergies myself and take benedryl or chlortrimeton (generic
> versions). Both put me to sleep so I take them only at night.
> Is your cat sleeping more now? 2mg sounds like a lot since the human dose
> is 4mg every 6 hours.
>

It does sound like a lot, but it does not work the way we might think, i.e.
dosage according to poundage. Call your vet in the morning to verify!
She might get a bit more sleepy but she is a cat, she already sleeps a
lot so who can tell? Best thing is it stops her from scratching and
helps when she has the sniffles.

cybercat
October 20th 05, 01:33 AM
"5cats" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
>
>>
>> "5cats" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> One of my cats apparently has allergies. I recall being told years
> ago
>>> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
> things
>>> that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
>>> specific.
>>>
>>> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
>>> human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages small
> enough
>>> for
>>> a cat?
>>>
>>
>> I just went through this with my kitty who has allergies. Please call
>> your own vet to verify this--but my vet told me to give my cat
>> Chlortrimeton (that is the brand name but there is a generic). It comes
>> in 4 mg tablets, and he said I could give her 2 mgs every twelve hours.
>> I have a pill cutter and cut them in half. This is a 7-lb cat, and she
> is
>> on no other medications except quarterly Depo Medrol shots.
>> Again, do call your vet to verify that this is okay for your cat.
>>
>> Also: work on removing the allergens.
>>
>
> I have allergies myself and take benedryl or chlortrimeton (generic
> versions). Both put me to sleep so I take them only at night.
> Is your cat sleeping more now? 2mg sounds like a lot since the human dose
> is 4mg every 6 hours.
>

It does sound like a lot, but it does not work the way we might think, i.e.
dosage according to poundage. Call your vet in the morning to verify!
She might get a bit more sleepy but she is a cat, she already sleeps a
lot so who can tell? Best thing is it stops her from scratching and
helps when she has the sniffles.

5cats
October 20th 05, 01:53 AM
Phil P. wrote:

>
> "5cats" > wrote in message
> ...
>> One of my cats apparently has allergies.
>
> What kind of allergies?

Don't know. She's overgroomed to the point of creating a small raw patch
on her tummy. (Is that what they call a "hot spot"?)
Considering the time of year it could be seasonal. This also corresponds
to a change in diet from dry K/D to K/D canned. There's also a new cat
bed she uses which smells funny to me. "catnip treated" it said on the
tag. Also, I stopped using my room air filter for my own allergies in the
same timeframe.

> I recall being told years ago
>> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
things
>> that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
> specific.
>
>> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
>> human OTC antihistamines off-label?
>
>
> Yup. The most common antihistamine used in cats is cyproheptadine
> (Periactin). Along with antihistamine/antipuritic effects, it's also
an
> effective appetite stimulant and its also used in controlling urine
> spraying.

> Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) is also sometimes used in cats before
> vaccinations to prevent reactions to the vaccine.
>
> Antihistamines also have a mild sedative effect in cats.
>
> How do you get dosages small enough for
>> a cat?
>
> Cut the pills in half or quarters. The 4 mg tablets are scored for
easy
> cutting.

Even 1/4 is a larger dosage than I would have guessed for a 12 pound
cat.

5cats
October 20th 05, 01:58 AM
cybercat wrote:

>
> "5cats" > wrote in message
> ...
>> cybercat wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> "5cats" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> One of my cats apparently has allergies. I recall being told years
>> ago
>>>> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
>> things
>>>> that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
>>>> specific.
>>>>
>>>> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just
>>>> using human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages
>>>> small
>> enough
>>>> for
>>>> a cat?
>>>>
>>>
>>> I just went through this with my kitty who has allergies. Please
>>> call your own vet to verify this--but my vet told me to give my cat
>>> Chlortrimeton (that is the brand name but there is a generic). It
>>> comes in 4 mg tablets, and he said I could give her 2 mgs every
>>> twelve hours. I have a pill cutter and cut them in half. This is a
>>> 7-lb cat, and she
>> is
>>> on no other medications except quarterly Depo Medrol shots.
>>> Again, do call your vet to verify that this is okay for your cat.
>>>
>>> Also: work on removing the allergens.
>>>
>>
>> I have allergies myself and take benedryl or chlortrimeton (generic
>> versions). Both put me to sleep so I take them only at night.
>> Is your cat sleeping more now? 2mg sounds like a lot since the human
>> dose is 4mg every 6 hours.
>>
>
> It does sound like a lot, but it does not work the way we might think,
> i.e. dosage according to poundage. Call your vet in the morning to
> verify! She might get a bit more sleepy but she is a cat, she already
> sleeps a lot so who can tell? Best thing is it stops her from
> scratching and helps when she has the sniffles.
>

We saw a vet yesterday, but she's only a temp fill-in and she seemed
really hesitant to make any firm recommendations.
I'll be able to talk to my regular vet on Friday. In the mean time the
steroid/antibiotic cream we got yesterday really does seem to be helping.

Cheryl
October 20th 05, 02:24 AM
On Wed 19 Oct 2005 08:53:10p, 5cats wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
):

> Even 1/4 is a larger dosage than I would have guessed for a 12
> pound cat.
>

1/4 pill of human Chlortimatron was what was prescribed to get rid of
sneezed and sniffles for 4 month old kittens of mine. Doses of
certain drugs for cats can't even compare to humans in terms of
weight. They don't metabolize in the same way. That said, my allergic
cat with skin allergies isn't helped by antihistamines - any of the
common three usually used. Sometimes they're used in conjunction with
omega 3s, but that didn't help mine, either.

--
Cheryl

cybercat
October 20th 05, 02:44 AM
"5cats" > wrote in message
...
:
:>>
>
> We saw a vet yesterday, but she's only a temp fill-in and she seemed
> really hesitant to make any firm recommendations.
> I'll be able to talk to my regular vet on Friday. In the mean time the
> steroid/antibiotic cream we got yesterday really does seem to be helping.
>
>
FWIW, I asked my vet what to give my cat when she kept scratching
until she had little raw spots on her ears. That was the second time he
prescribed Chlortrimeton. The first time, she had congestion from
allergies that had made her nose sore. (She was uncharacteristically
avoiding being touched on her face.) She has EGC and asthma and
tends to overgroom.

My vets are Drs. Sullivan, Price, and Driscoll at Six forks Animal
Hospital in Raleigh, NC. (They have a web site.) I like them because
they are three different generations, all graduates from the NC State
Vet School. They are pretty careful, clearly love cats, and do a lot of
gratis work for the community.

Rhonda
October 20th 05, 03:33 AM
If you use and antihistamine, I'd make sure you get it (and proper
dosage) from a vet.

Watch your cat after he/she takes it the first time. Our cat could not
stay awake afterwards, he got a bit dangerous. He would sit there and
his head would drop to the floor. We had to confine him until he slept
it off.

We only did that once...

Rhonda

5cats wrote:

>
> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
> human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages small enough for
> a cat?
>
>

Karen
October 20th 05, 04:30 AM
On 2005-10-19 10:37:05 -0500, 5cats > said:

> One of my cats apparently has allergies. I recall being told years ago
> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
> things that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything
> very specific.
> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
> human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages small enough
> for a cat?

I was given some for one of my cats. I started her on it but she
stopped eating and though I don't believe it was connected ( I think
she was just stressed from the vet visit where we also found very full
anal sacks that were hard to express) I haven't started her up on them
yet. Plus, the weather got colder and we had a freeze which has helped.
So, I can't tell you if they work yet or not. My vet says it's about
50/50. I bought them from my vet. I can use anywhere from 1/4 of a
tablet up to 2 tablets per day she tells me. They were VERY cheap.

Karen
October 20th 05, 04:34 AM
On 2005-10-19 10:37:05 -0500, 5cats > said:

> One of my cats apparently has allergies. I recall being told years ago
> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
> things that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything
> very specific.
> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
> human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages small enough
> for a cat?

Oh, it is chlorpheremir.

Karen
October 20th 05, 04:37 AM
On 2005-10-19 21:33:42 -0500, Rhonda > said:

> If you use and antihistamine, I'd make sure you get it (and proper
> dosage) from a vet.
>
> Watch your cat after he/she takes it the first time. Our cat could not
> stay awake afterwards, he got a bit dangerous. He would sit there and
> his head would drop to the floor. We had to confine him until he slept
> it off.
>
> We only did that once...
>
> Rhonda
>
> 5cats wrote:
>
>>
>> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
>> human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages small enough
>> for a cat?

Wow. I did give Sugar 1/4 of a tablet two days in a row, but it did not
seem to make her sleepy.

5cats
October 20th 05, 04:39 AM
Karen wrote:

> On 2005-10-19 10:37:05 -0500, 5cats > said:
>
>> One of my cats apparently has allergies. I recall being told years
ago
>> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
>> things that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything
>> very specific.
>> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
>> human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages small
enough
>> for a cat?
>
> I was given some for one of my cats. I started her on it but she
> stopped eating and though I don't believe it was connected ( I think
> she was just stressed from the vet visit where we also found very full
> anal sacks that were hard to express) I haven't started her up on them
> yet. Plus, the weather got colder and we had a freeze which has helped.
> So, I can't tell you if they work yet or not. My vet says it's about
> 50/50. I bought them from my vet. I can use anywhere from 1/4 of a
> tablet up to 2 tablets per day she tells me. They were VERY cheap.

I always look forward to the first hard frost because that's when my own
allergies mostly stop or at least ease up considerably. It shouldn't be
too much longer now.

Could you post the name of the drug you have?

Phil P.
October 20th 05, 06:04 AM
"5cats" > wrote in message
...
> Phil P. wrote:
>
> >
> > "5cats" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> One of my cats apparently has allergies.
> >
> > What kind of allergies?
>
> Don't know. She's overgroomed to the point of creating a small raw patch
> on her tummy. (Is that what they call a "hot spot"?)
> Considering the time of year it could be seasonal. This also corresponds
> to a change in diet from dry K/D to K/D canned. There's also a new cat
> bed she uses which smells funny to me. "catnip treated" it said on the
> tag. Also, I stopped using my room air filter for my own allergies in the
> same timeframe.


It might be behavioral- stress-related rather than pathologic - i.e.,
"psychogenic alopecia". OTOH, I've known many cats that were just plain
itchy! and no medical or behavioral cause of the itching and excessive
grooming could be found. The first step is a thorough physical exam to rule
out medical causes. I wouldn't advise giving her any drugs- even OTC
without consulting a vet. I know you know that, but I had to say it.


>
> > I recall being told years ago
> >> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
> things
> >> that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
> > specific.
> >
> >> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
> >> human OTC antihistamines off-label?
> >
> >
> > Yup. The most common antihistamine used in cats is cyproheptadine
> > (Periactin). Along with antihistamine/antipuritic effects, it's also
> an
> > effective appetite stimulant and its also used in controlling urine
> > spraying.
>
> > Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) is also sometimes used in cats before
> > vaccinations to prevent reactions to the vaccine.
> >
> > Antihistamines also have a mild sedative effect in cats.
> >
> > How do you get dosages small enough for
> >> a cat?
> >
> > Cut the pills in half or quarters. The 4 mg tablets are scored for
> easy
> > cutting.
>
> Even 1/4 is a larger dosage than I would have guessed for a 12 pound
> cat.

I've used 1/2 of a tab in cats that weighed as little 5# with no significant
adverse effects. If your vet does prescribe 1/2 or 1/4 tab of
cyproheptadine or any other tablet, put it inside a #2 or #3 gelcap- it
masks the taste and eliminates the risk of the sharp edges of the cut tablet
cutting or irritating the esophagus. Follow the gelcap with canned food or
tuna water to make sure it goes all the way down.

Phil

Phil P.
October 20th 05, 06:06 AM
"Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "5cats" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > > One of my cats apparently has allergies.
> >
> > What kind of allergies?
> >
> >
> > I recall being told years ago
> > > that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
things
> > > that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
> > specific.
> >
> > > Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
> > > human OTC antihistamines off-label?
> >
> >
> > Yup. The most common antihistamine used in cats is cyproheptadine
> > (Periactin). Along with antihistamine/antipuritic effects, it's also an
> > effective appetite stimulant and its also used in controlling urine
> > spraying.
> >
> > Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) is also sometimes used in cats before
> > vaccinations to prevent reactions to the vaccine.
> >
> > Antihistamines also have a mild sedative effect in cats.
> >
> > How do you get dosages small enough for
> > > a cat?
> >
> > Cut the pills in half or quarters. The 4 mg tablets are scored for
easy
> > cutting.
>
>
> Phil, I think it important to add that cyproheptadine can have a very
strong
> and long lasting sedative effect on cats.


I wouldn't say the sedative effects are "very strong and long lasting".
IMO, the sedative effects of cyproheptadine are rather mild and don't seem
to last very long in the majority of cats. I think the sedative effects are
much more pronounced with Benadryl and especially Chlor-Trimeton. In fact,
Chlor-Trimeton is actually used as mild sedative in cats.


>Plus, at that dosage it seems to have no appetite stimulating benefit.


Your experience seems very different than mine. Cyproheptadine @ 2 mg/b.i.d.
is a very effective and fast acting- but short-acting appetite stimulant.
Its probably the most widely used appetite stimulate for cats- much more
preferable than prednisone.


>It needs to be administered
cautiously and IMO starting at a quarter the dose the vet prescribes.


Cyproheptadine is a prescription drug- so I'm sure the vet knows the proper
dose- which, btw, is usually 2 mg/b.i.d. or 1/2 of a 4 mg tablet.

Phil

Wendy
October 20th 05, 11:30 AM
"5cats" > wrote in message
...
> Karen wrote:
>
>> On 2005-10-19 10:37:05 -0500, 5cats > said:
>>
>>> One of my cats apparently has allergies. I recall being told years
> ago
>>> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
>>> things that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything
>>> very specific.
>>> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
>>> human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages small
> enough
>>> for a cat?
>>
>> I was given some for one of my cats. I started her on it but she
>> stopped eating and though I don't believe it was connected ( I think
>> she was just stressed from the vet visit where we also found very full
>> anal sacks that were hard to express) I haven't started her up on them
>> yet. Plus, the weather got colder and we had a freeze which has helped.
>> So, I can't tell you if they work yet or not. My vet says it's about
>> 50/50. I bought them from my vet. I can use anywhere from 1/4 of a
>> tablet up to 2 tablets per day she tells me. They were VERY cheap.
>
> I always look forward to the first hard frost because that's when my own
> allergies mostly stop or at least ease up considerably. It shouldn't be
> too much longer now.
>
You and me both. I had a tickle in the back of my throat that was driving me
nuts and now it's just the blocked up sinus. Come on killing frost!

I've got a litter of fosters who have been sneezing occasionally. Not enough
to figure they have a full blown URI but just a couple of times a day.
Wonder if they have allergies?

W

cybercat
October 20th 05, 03:22 PM
"Wendy" > wrote :
>>
>> I always look forward to the first hard frost because that's when my own
>> allergies mostly stop or at least ease up considerably. It shouldn't be
>> too much longer now.
>>
> You and me both. I had a tickle in the back of my throat that was driving
> me nuts and now it's just the blocked up sinus. Come on killing frost!
>
> I've got a litter of fosters who have been sneezing occasionally. Not
> enough to figure they have a full blown URI but just a couple of times a
> day. Wonder if they have allergies?
>

I don't know how it is with kittens, but with my cat, as an allergy
sufferer it was easy to tell that is what she has. Her eyes water, she
looks grumpy, her nose stays wet from sneezing, and she scratches
a lot. Since we have addressed the food allergies and eliminated
dust and mold, (and since she gets the Depo Medrol shots) I
think this is a seasonal thing. When I notice these symptoms or
that she has scratched a little red spot into her ears, I use the
Chlortrimeton, but just one or two doses as I am afraid
of overmedicating her. It seems to help. I notice that she
scratches less.

Karen
October 20th 05, 06:44 PM
On 2005-10-19 22:39:12 -0500, 5cats > said:

> Karen wrote:
>
>> On 2005-10-19 10:37:05 -0500, 5cats > said:
>>
>>> One of my cats apparently has allergies. I recall being told years
> ago
>>> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
>>> things that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything
>>> very specific.
>>> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just using
>>> human OTC antihistamines off-label? How do you get dosages small
> enough
>>> for a cat?
>>
>> I was given some for one of my cats. I started her on it but she
>> stopped eating and though I don't believe it was connected ( I think
>> she was just stressed from the vet visit where we also found very full
>> anal sacks that were hard to express) I haven't started her up on them
>> yet. Plus, the weather got colder and we had a freeze which has helped.
>> So, I can't tell you if they work yet or not. My vet says it's about
>> 50/50. I bought them from my vet. I can use anywhere from 1/4 of a
>> tablet up to 2 tablets per day she tells me. They were VERY cheap.
>
> I always look forward to the first hard frost because that's when my
> own allergies mostly stop or at least ease up considerably. It
> shouldn't be too much longer now.
> Could you post the name of the drug you have?

It says chlormeraphir on the label. I think it is some generic form of
Chloro-trimeton.

Paul M. Cook
October 20th 05, 08:06 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
...
>
> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >
> > "Phil P." > wrote in message
> > ...
> > >
> > > "5cats" > wrote in message
> > > ...
> > > > One of my cats apparently has allergies.
> > >
> > > What kind of allergies?
> > >
> > >
> > > I recall being told years ago
> > > > that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
> things
> > > > that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
> > > specific.
> > >
> > > > Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just
using
> > > > human OTC antihistamines off-label?
> > >
> > >
> > > Yup. The most common antihistamine used in cats is cyproheptadine
> > > (Periactin). Along with antihistamine/antipuritic effects, it's also
an
> > > effective appetite stimulant and its also used in controlling urine
> > > spraying.
> > >
> > > Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) is also sometimes used in cats before
> > > vaccinations to prevent reactions to the vaccine.
> > >
> > > Antihistamines also have a mild sedative effect in cats.
> > >
> > > How do you get dosages small enough for
> > > > a cat?
> > >
> > > Cut the pills in half or quarters. The 4 mg tablets are scored for
> easy
> > > cutting.
> >
> >
> > Phil, I think it important to add that cyproheptadine can have a very
> strong
> > and long lasting sedative effect on cats.
>
>
> I wouldn't say the sedative effects are "very strong and long lasting".
> IMO, the sedative effects of cyproheptadine are rather mild and don't seem
> to last very long in the majority of cats. I think the sedative effects
are
> much more pronounced with Benadryl and especially Chlor-Trimeton. In
fact,
> Chlor-Trimeton is actually used as mild sedative in cats.
>
>
> >Plus, at that dosage it seems to have no appetite stimulating benefit.
>
>
> Your experience seems very different than mine. Cyproheptadine @ 2
mg/b.i.d.
> is a very effective and fast acting- but short-acting appetite stimulant.
> Its probably the most widely used appetite stimulate for cats- much more
> preferable than prednisone.
>
>
> >It needs to be administered
> cautiously and IMO starting at a quarter the dose the vet prescribes.
>
>
> Cyproheptadine is a prescription drug- so I'm sure the vet knows the
proper
> dose- which, btw, is usually 2 mg/b.i.d. or 1/2 of a 4 mg tablet.


My deceased cat Zipper and my cat Buddy both reacted poorly to it. They
were so zonked they didn't eat. Anyway, my advice was simply to start out
very low and see what the cat will tolerate. I'm sure it is perfectly safe
its just that in 2 cats I saw a very intense reaction to it that although
was not harmful, nevertheless it did not help them eat which was the idea
behind it in the first place.

As for dosage Zipper was initially prescribed a full tablet. He hardly
moved for 2 days afterwards. It was distressing. Buddy had the same
reaction on 1/4 tablet. Now if his liver acts up he gets an injection of
Azium. That seems to really help.

Paul

Phil P.
October 21st 05, 06:50 AM
"Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]
> > >
> > > "Phil P." > wrote in message
> > > ...
> > > >
> > > > "5cats" > wrote in message
> > > > ...
> > > > > One of my cats apparently has allergies.
> > > >
> > > > What kind of allergies?
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > I recall being told years ago
> > > > > that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
> > things
> > > > > that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
> > > > specific.
> > > >
> > > > > Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just
> using
> > > > > human OTC antihistamines off-label?
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > Yup. The most common antihistamine used in cats is cyproheptadine
> > > > (Periactin). Along with antihistamine/antipuritic effects, it's
also
> an
> > > > effective appetite stimulant and its also used in controlling urine
> > > > spraying.
> > > >
> > > > Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) is also sometimes used in cats before
> > > > vaccinations to prevent reactions to the vaccine.
> > > >
> > > > Antihistamines also have a mild sedative effect in cats.
> > > >
> > > > How do you get dosages small enough for
> > > > > a cat?
> > > >
> > > > Cut the pills in half or quarters. The 4 mg tablets are scored for
> > easy
> > > > cutting.
> > >
> > >
> > > Phil, I think it important to add that cyproheptadine can have a very
> > strong
> > > and long lasting sedative effect on cats.
> >
> >
> > I wouldn't say the sedative effects are "very strong and long lasting".
> > IMO, the sedative effects of cyproheptadine are rather mild and don't
seem
> > to last very long in the majority of cats. I think the sedative effects
> are
> > much more pronounced with Benadryl and especially Chlor-Trimeton. In
> fact,
> > Chlor-Trimeton is actually used as mild sedative in cats.
> >
> >
> > >Plus, at that dosage it seems to have no appetite stimulating benefit.
> >
> >
> > Your experience seems very different than mine. Cyproheptadine @ 2
> mg/b.i.d.
> > is a very effective and fast acting- but short-acting appetite
stimulant.
> > Its probably the most widely used appetite stimulate for cats- much more
> > preferable than prednisone.
> >
> >
> > >It needs to be administered
> > cautiously and IMO starting at a quarter the dose the vet prescribes.
> >
> >
> > Cyproheptadine is a prescription drug- so I'm sure the vet knows the
> proper
> > dose- which, btw, is usually 2 mg/b.i.d. or 1/2 of a 4 mg tablet.
>
>
> My deceased cat Zipper and my cat Buddy both reacted poorly to it. They
> were so zonked they didn't eat.

Did you use a generic brand or the actual Periactin? Dispite what you may
have heard, generic formulations certainly do vary. The worst effect I've
seen were only mild and transient sedative effects and occasional
paradoxical agitated behavior in a few cats- and I've treated many cats with
cyproheptadine.

Were your cats taking any other medications? Some other drugs can produce a
synergistic sedative effect on the CNS when taken with cyproheptadine.
Also, some medications can cause partial or complete anorexia that can
override the appetite- stimulating effects of cyproheptadine.
Chemotherapeutic drugs almost always cause anorexia and frequently alter
smell and taste perceptions- which can utterly wipe out appetite. IIRC,
Zipper had cancer and was put on chemotherapy after the surgery to remove
the mass.

Cats are usually given appetite stimulants because an underlying disease is
causing anorexia. Cyproheptadine isn't a panacea and it won't 'cure' the
cause of the anorexia- it will only stimulate a cat's appetite unless the
underlying disease is serious enough to override the appetite- stimulating
effects, (e.g., cancer cachexia, hepatic lipidosis or other liver diseases).

I don't think the sedative effects were as profound as they may have seemed
to you. OTOH, they could have been the result of a combination of the
effects of the underlying disease and/or other medications. As I said, I've
treated many cats with cyproheptadine and I haven't seen the profound
effects you've described when the drug is administered at the normally
prescribed doses.


Anyway, my advice was simply to start out
> very low and see what the cat will tolerate.


Since cyproheptadine is a prescription drug, I think people should follow
their vet's prescribing instructions rather than arbitrarily changing the
dose based on an exceptional case of side effects rather than the norm.
Cyproheptadine is prescribed to most cats to jump start their appetite
because they haven't been eating for awhile. Thus, I think its wiser to
begin therapy with the normal dose- to get the cat eating again and taper
the dose if the sedative effects seem unpleasant. The consequences of
anorexia in cats are more severe than mild sedation. It boils down to the
risk-to-benefit ratio. In the case of anorexia, the benefits of
cyproheptadine greatly outweigh the risks.



I'm sure it is perfectly safe
> its just that in 2 cats I saw a very intense reaction to it that although
> was not harmful, nevertheless it did not help them eat which was the idea
> behind it in the first place.

As I said, cyproheptadine will only stimulate a cat's appetite unless the
underlying disease is serious enough to override the appetite- stimulating
effects- it won't 'cure' the cause of the anorexia.


>
> As for dosage Zipper was initially prescribed a full tablet. He hardly
> moved for 2 days afterwards. It was distressing.

4 mg b.i.d. is at the high-end of the dosing schedule and could produce a
more pronounced sedative effect.


Buddy had the same
> reaction on 1/4 tablet. Now if his liver acts up he gets an injection of
> Azium. That seems to really help.


Dexamethasone is about 10x more potent than prednisone. What type of liver
disease does Buddy have that requires such a potent drug?

5cats
October 21st 05, 10:18 PM
Phil P. wrote:

>
> "5cats" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Phil P. wrote:
>>
>> >
>> > "5cats" > wrote in message
>> > ...
>> >> One of my cats apparently has allergies.
>> >
>> > What kind of allergies?
>>
>> Don't know. She's overgroomed to the point of creating a small raw
>> patch on her tummy. (Is that what they call a "hot spot"?)
>> Considering the time of year it could be seasonal. This also
>> corresponds to a change in diet from dry K/D to K/D canned. There's
>> also a new cat bed she uses which smells funny to me. "catnip
>> treated" it said on the tag. Also, I stopped using my room air filter
>> for my own allergies in the same timeframe.
>
>
> It might be behavioral- stress-related rather than pathologic - i.e.,
> "psychogenic alopecia". OTOH, I've known many cats that were just
> plain itchy! and no medical or behavioral cause of the itching and
> excessive grooming could be found. The first step is a thorough
> physical exam to rule out medical causes. I wouldn't advise giving
> her any drugs- even OTC without consulting a vet. I know you know
> that, but I had to say it.
>
>
>>
>> > I recall being told years ago
>> >> that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading some
>> things
>> >> that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything very
>> > specific.
>> >
>> >> Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just
>> >> using human OTC antihistamines off-label?
>> >
>> >
>> > Yup. The most common antihistamine used in cats is cyproheptadine
>> > (Periactin). Along with antihistamine/antipuritic effects, it's
>> > also
>> an
>> > effective appetite stimulant and its also used in controlling urine
>> > spraying.
>>
>> > Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) is also sometimes used in cats before
>> > vaccinations to prevent reactions to the vaccine.
>> >
>> > Antihistamines also have a mild sedative effect in cats.
>> >
>> > How do you get dosages small enough for
>> >> a cat?
>> >
>> > Cut the pills in half or quarters. The 4 mg tablets are scored
>> > for
>> easy
>> > cutting.
>>
>> Even 1/4 is a larger dosage than I would have guessed for a 12 pound
>> cat.
>
> I've used 1/2 of a tab in cats that weighed as little 5# with no
> significant adverse effects. If your vet does prescribe 1/2 or 1/4 tab
> of cyproheptadine or any other tablet, put it inside a #2 or #3
> gelcap- it masks the taste and eliminates the risk of the sharp edges
> of the cut tablet cutting or irritating the esophagus. Follow the
> gelcap with canned food or tuna water to make sure it goes all the way
> down.
>
> Phil
>
>

I spoke with the vet this afternoon and she said that in her experience
antihistamines often don't work all that well for allergies in cats, but
we are still going to give it a trial. 1/2 tablet Chlortrimaton 2x a day.

I just gave it to Pookie, crushed and mixed in with a tablespoon of
turkey baby food. (Since I had a jar of it around with no other use for
it right now.)

cybercat
October 22nd 05, 12:25 AM
"5cats" > wrote
>>
>> I've used 1/2 of a tab in cats that weighed as little 5# with no
>> significant adverse effects. If your vet does prescribe 1/2 or 1/4 tab
>> of cyproheptadine or any other tablet, put it inside a #2 or #3
>> gelcap- it masks the taste and eliminates the risk of the sharp edges
>> of the cut tablet cutting or irritating the esophagus. Follow the
>> gelcap with canned food or tuna water to make sure it goes all the way
>> down.
>>
>> Phil
>>
>>
>
> I spoke with the vet this afternoon and she said that in her experience
> antihistamines often don't work all that well for allergies in cats, but
> we are still going to give it a trial. 1/2 tablet Chlortrimaton 2x a day.
>
> I just gave it to Pookie, crushed and mixed in with a tablespoon of
> turkey baby food. (Since I had a jar of it around with no other use for
> it right now.)


So your vet agreed with my vet, at least as far as which antihistamine to
use. Interesting. Whether it works or not probably depends on the cat.
Even with humans the same medicine does not work the same on
different people. Let us know how it works out.

Paul M. Cook
October 23rd 05, 12:03 AM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
...
>
> "Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >
> > "Phil P." > wrote in message
> > ...
> > >
> > > "Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
> > > news:[email protected]
> > > >
> > > > "Phil P." > wrote in message
> > > > ...
> > > > >
> > > > > "5cats" > wrote in message
> > > > > ...
> > > > > > One of my cats apparently has allergies.
> > > > >
> > > > > What kind of allergies?
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > I recall being told years ago
> > > > > > that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading
some
> > > things
> > > > > > that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything
very
> > > > > specific.
> > > > >
> > > > > > Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people just
> > using
> > > > > > human OTC antihistamines off-label?
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > Yup. The most common antihistamine used in cats is cyproheptadine
> > > > > (Periactin). Along with antihistamine/antipuritic effects, it's
> also
> > an
> > > > > effective appetite stimulant and its also used in controlling
urine
> > > > > spraying.
> > > > >
> > > > > Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) is also sometimes used in cats before
> > > > > vaccinations to prevent reactions to the vaccine.
> > > > >
> > > > > Antihistamines also have a mild sedative effect in cats.
> > > > >
> > > > > How do you get dosages small enough for
> > > > > > a cat?
> > > > >
> > > > > Cut the pills in half or quarters. The 4 mg tablets are scored
for
> > > easy
> > > > > cutting.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > Phil, I think it important to add that cyproheptadine can have a
very
> > > strong
> > > > and long lasting sedative effect on cats.
> > >
> > >
> > > I wouldn't say the sedative effects are "very strong and long
lasting".
> > > IMO, the sedative effects of cyproheptadine are rather mild and don't
> seem
> > > to last very long in the majority of cats. I think the sedative
effects
> > are
> > > much more pronounced with Benadryl and especially Chlor-Trimeton. In
> > fact,
> > > Chlor-Trimeton is actually used as mild sedative in cats.
> > >
> > >
> > > >Plus, at that dosage it seems to have no appetite stimulating
benefit.
> > >
> > >
> > > Your experience seems very different than mine. Cyproheptadine @ 2
> > mg/b.i.d.
> > > is a very effective and fast acting- but short-acting appetite
> stimulant.
> > > Its probably the most widely used appetite stimulate for cats- much
more
> > > preferable than prednisone.
> > >
> > >
> > > >It needs to be administered
> > > cautiously and IMO starting at a quarter the dose the vet prescribes.
> > >
> > >
> > > Cyproheptadine is a prescription drug- so I'm sure the vet knows the
> > proper
> > > dose- which, btw, is usually 2 mg/b.i.d. or 1/2 of a 4 mg tablet.
> >
> >
> > My deceased cat Zipper and my cat Buddy both reacted poorly to it. They
> > were so zonked they didn't eat.
>
> Did you use a generic brand or the actual Periactin? Dispite what you may
> have heard, generic formulations certainly do vary. The worst effect I've
> seen were only mild and transient sedative effects and occasional
> paradoxical agitated behavior in a few cats- and I've treated many cats
with
> cyproheptadine.
>
> Were your cats taking any other medications? Some other drugs can produce
a
> synergistic sedative effect on the CNS when taken with cyproheptadine.
> Also, some medications can cause partial or complete anorexia that can
> override the appetite- stimulating effects of cyproheptadine.
> Chemotherapeutic drugs almost always cause anorexia and frequently alter
> smell and taste perceptions- which can utterly wipe out appetite. IIRC,
> Zipper had cancer and was put on chemotherapy after the surgery to remove
> the mass.

He had a benign thymoma in his chest the size of a golf ball and it was
removed. Simultaneously he was developing colon cancer (lymphoma) which
went undiagnosed due to the tumor - nobody thought to look for another
illness. So then he was started on the chemo but he had a PEG tube until
the final 2 weeks of his life. He was put on cyproheptadine previously when
he stopped eating and wasted after a bathing at a groomer but that was 7
years earlier. The drug didn't help then.

> Cats are usually given appetite stimulants because an underlying disease
is
> causing anorexia. Cyproheptadine isn't a panacea and it won't 'cure' the
> cause of the anorexia- it will only stimulate a cat's appetite unless the
> underlying disease is serious enough to override the appetite- stimulating
> effects, (e.g., cancer cachexia, hepatic lipidosis or other liver
diseases).
>
> I don't think the sedative effects were as profound as they may have
seemed
> to you. OTOH, they could have been the result of a combination of the
> effects of the underlying disease and/or other medications. As I said,
I've
> treated many cats with cyproheptadine and I haven't seen the profound
> effects you've described when the drug is administered at the normally
> prescribed doses.
>
>
> Anyway, my advice was simply to start out
> > very low and see what the cat will tolerate.
>
>
> Since cyproheptadine is a prescription drug, I think people should follow
> their vet's prescribing instructions rather than arbitrarily changing the
> dose based on an exceptional case of side effects rather than the norm.
> Cyproheptadine is prescribed to most cats to jump start their appetite
> because they haven't been eating for awhile. Thus, I think its wiser to
> begin therapy with the normal dose- to get the cat eating again and taper
> the dose if the sedative effects seem unpleasant. The consequences of
> anorexia in cats are more severe than mild sedation. It boils down to the
> risk-to-benefit ratio. In the case of anorexia, the benefits of
> cyproheptadine greatly outweigh the risks.
>
>
>
> I'm sure it is perfectly safe
> > its just that in 2 cats I saw a very intense reaction to it that
although
> > was not harmful, nevertheless it did not help them eat which was the
idea
> > behind it in the first place.
>
> As I said, cyproheptadine will only stimulate a cat's appetite unless the
> underlying disease is serious enough to override the appetite- stimulating
> effects- it won't 'cure' the cause of the anorexia.
>
>
> >
> > As for dosage Zipper was initially prescribed a full tablet. He hardly
> > moved for 2 days afterwards. It was distressing.
>
> 4 mg b.i.d. is at the high-end of the dosing schedule and could produce a
> more pronounced sedative effect.
>
>
> Buddy had the same
> > reaction on 1/4 tablet. Now if his liver acts up he gets an injection
of
> > Azium. That seems to really help.
>
>
> Dexamethasone is about 10x more potent than prednisone. What type of
liver
> disease does Buddy have that requires such a potent drug?
>

Buddy has a compromised liver due to injury most likely from ingesting
tainted water when he was living feral. Plus he is hyperthyroid and that
too affects his liver. He has also had cholangeohepatitus with very yellow
serum. So his liver is a mess and must be monitored often. It flairs up
from time to time and he goes off his food. The worst spell he had resulted
in 5 days of IV fluids and a shot of Azium to get him eating again. It
worked wonders and did not have the adverse affect of the sleepiness.

Paul

5cats
October 23rd 05, 08:26 PM
cybercat wrote:

>
> "5cats" > wrote
>>>
>>> I've used 1/2 of a tab in cats that weighed as little 5# with no
>>> significant adverse effects. If your vet does prescribe 1/2 or 1/4
>>> tab of cyproheptadine or any other tablet, put it inside a #2 or #3
>>> gelcap- it masks the taste and eliminates the risk of the sharp
>>> edges of the cut tablet cutting or irritating the esophagus. Follow
>>> the gelcap with canned food or tuna water to make sure it goes all
>>> the way down.
>>>
>>> Phil
>>>
>>>
>>
>> I spoke with the vet this afternoon and she said that in her
>> experience antihistamines often don't work all that well for
>> allergies in cats, but we are still going to give it a trial. 1/2
>> tablet Chlortrimaton 2x a day.
>>
>> I just gave it to Pookie, crushed and mixed in with a tablespoon of
>> turkey baby food. (Since I had a jar of it around with no other use
>> for it right now.)
>
>
> So your vet agreed with my vet, at least as far as which antihistamine
> to use. Interesting. Whether it works or not probably depends on the
> cat. Even with humans the same medicine does not work the same on
> different people. Let us know how it works out.

Well, she caught on to the baby food trick, or she just doesn't like
refrigerated and re-warmed baby food. Not much change to report yet, she
slept soundly for 2 to 3 hours after the first does, but woke in time for
dinner and has been normally active since then. She does have a huge
appetite, I'm really going to have to watch her sneaking off to the other
cats plates after her own is cleaned off, she's already a bit heavy, she
sure doesn't need to put on any more weight. I can pill her normally,
but she gets tired of that and then starts to mistrust me whenever I
appoach her so I'm going to try these Pill Pockets treats next.

Phil P.
October 25th 05, 05:24 AM
"Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
> > news:[email protected]
> > >
> > > "Phil P." > wrote in message
> > > ...
> > > >
> > > > "Paul M. Cook" > wrote in message
> > > > news:[email protected]
> > > > >
> > > > > "Phil P." > wrote in message
> > > > > ...
> > > > > >
> > > > > > "5cats" > wrote in message
> > > > > > ...
> > > > > > > One of my cats apparently has allergies.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > What kind of allergies?
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > I recall being told years ago
> > > > > > > that antihistamines didn't work in cats, but now I'm reading
> some
> > > > things
> > > > > > > that suggest that they do work. But I haven't found anything
> very
> > > > > > specific.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > Are there veterinary antihistamines available or are people
just
> > > using
> > > > > > > human OTC antihistamines off-label?
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Yup. The most common antihistamine used in cats is
cyproheptadine
> > > > > > (Periactin). Along with antihistamine/antipuritic effects, it's
> > also
> > > an
> > > > > > effective appetite stimulant and its also used in controlling
> urine
> > > > > > spraying.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Diphenhydramine (Benadryl) is also sometimes used in cats before
> > > > > > vaccinations to prevent reactions to the vaccine.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Antihistamines also have a mild sedative effect in cats.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > How do you get dosages small enough for
> > > > > > > a cat?
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Cut the pills in half or quarters. The 4 mg tablets are scored
> for
> > > > easy
> > > > > > cutting.
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > Phil, I think it important to add that cyproheptadine can have a
> very
> > > > strong
> > > > > and long lasting sedative effect on cats.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > I wouldn't say the sedative effects are "very strong and long
> lasting".
> > > > IMO, the sedative effects of cyproheptadine are rather mild and
don't
> > seem
> > > > to last very long in the majority of cats. I think the sedative
> effects
> > > are
> > > > much more pronounced with Benadryl and especially Chlor-Trimeton.
In
> > > fact,
> > > > Chlor-Trimeton is actually used as mild sedative in cats.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > >Plus, at that dosage it seems to have no appetite stimulating
> benefit.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > Your experience seems very different than mine. Cyproheptadine @ 2
> > > mg/b.i.d.
> > > > is a very effective and fast acting- but short-acting appetite
> > stimulant.
> > > > Its probably the most widely used appetite stimulate for cats- much
> more
> > > > preferable than prednisone.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > >It needs to be administered
> > > > cautiously and IMO starting at a quarter the dose the vet
prescribes.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > Cyproheptadine is a prescription drug- so I'm sure the vet knows the
> > > proper
> > > > dose- which, btw, is usually 2 mg/b.i.d. or 1/2 of a 4 mg tablet.
> > >
> > >
> > > My deceased cat Zipper and my cat Buddy both reacted poorly to it.
They
> > > were so zonked they didn't eat.
> >
> > Did you use a generic brand or the actual Periactin? Dispite what you
may
> > have heard, generic formulations certainly do vary. The worst effect
I've
> > seen were only mild and transient sedative effects and occasional
> > paradoxical agitated behavior in a few cats- and I've treated many cats
> with
> > cyproheptadine.
> >
> > Were your cats taking any other medications? Some other drugs can
produce
> a
> > synergistic sedative effect on the CNS when taken with cyproheptadine.
> > Also, some medications can cause partial or complete anorexia that can
> > override the appetite- stimulating effects of cyproheptadine.
> > Chemotherapeutic drugs almost always cause anorexia and frequently alter
> > smell and taste perceptions- which can utterly wipe out appetite. IIRC,
> > Zipper had cancer and was put on chemotherapy after the surgery to
remove
> > the mass.
>
> He had a benign thymoma in his chest the size of a golf ball and it was
> removed. Simultaneously he was developing colon cancer (lymphoma) which
> went undiagnosed due to the tumor - nobody thought to look for another
> illness. So then he was started on the chemo but he had a PEG tube until
> the final 2 weeks of his life. He was put on cyproheptadine previously
when
> he stopped eating and wasted after a bathing at a groomer but that was 7
> years earlier. The drug didn't help then.
>
> > Cats are usually given appetite stimulants because an underlying disease
> is
> > causing anorexia. Cyproheptadine isn't a panacea and it won't 'cure'
the
> > cause of the anorexia- it will only stimulate a cat's appetite unless
the
> > underlying disease is serious enough to override the appetite-
stimulating
> > effects, (e.g., cancer cachexia, hepatic lipidosis or other liver
> diseases).
> >
> > I don't think the sedative effects were as profound as they may have
> seemed
> > to you. OTOH, they could have been the result of a combination of the
> > effects of the underlying disease and/or other medications. As I said,
> I've
> > treated many cats with cyproheptadine and I haven't seen the profound
> > effects you've described when the drug is administered at the normally
> > prescribed doses.
> >
> >
> > Anyway, my advice was simply to start out
> > > very low and see what the cat will tolerate.
> >
> >
> > Since cyproheptadine is a prescription drug, I think people should
follow
> > their vet's prescribing instructions rather than arbitrarily changing
the
> > dose based on an exceptional case of side effects rather than the norm.
> > Cyproheptadine is prescribed to most cats to jump start their appetite
> > because they haven't been eating for awhile. Thus, I think its wiser to
> > begin therapy with the normal dose- to get the cat eating again and
taper
> > the dose if the sedative effects seem unpleasant. The consequences of
> > anorexia in cats are more severe than mild sedation. It boils down to
the
> > risk-to-benefit ratio. In the case of anorexia, the benefits of
> > cyproheptadine greatly outweigh the risks.
> >
> >
> >
> > I'm sure it is perfectly safe
> > > its just that in 2 cats I saw a very intense reaction to it that
> although
> > > was not harmful, nevertheless it did not help them eat which was the
> idea
> > > behind it in the first place.
> >
> > As I said, cyproheptadine will only stimulate a cat's appetite unless
the
> > underlying disease is serious enough to override the appetite-
stimulating
> > effects- it won't 'cure' the cause of the anorexia.
> >
> >
> > >
> > > As for dosage Zipper was initially prescribed a full tablet. He
hardly
> > > moved for 2 days afterwards. It was distressing.
> >
> > 4 mg b.i.d. is at the high-end of the dosing schedule and could produce
a
> > more pronounced sedative effect.
> >
> >
> > Buddy had the same
> > > reaction on 1/4 tablet. Now if his liver acts up he gets an injection
> of
> > > Azium. That seems to really help.
> >
> >
> > Dexamethasone is about 10x more potent than prednisone. What type of
> liver
> > disease does Buddy have that requires such a potent drug?
> >
>
> Buddy has a compromised liver due to injury most likely from ingesting
> tainted water when he was living feral. Plus he is hyperthyroid and that
> too affects his liver. He has also had cholangeohepatitus with very
yellow
> serum. So his liver is a mess and must be monitored often. It flairs up
> from time to time and he goes off his food. The worst spell he had
resulted
> in 5 days of IV fluids and a shot of Azium to get him eating again. It
> worked wonders and did not have the adverse affect of the sleepiness.


I'm really sorry to hear that he's having such a tough time.

I now understand why cyproheptadine didn't help his appetite. I'm sure
psychological disturbances associated with his liver condition overrode the
appetite-stimulating effects of cyproheptadine. I'm also fairly certain
that his illness-induced depression intensified the mild sedative effects of
cypro. So, I can understand why you don't like cypro.

In his case, the antiinflammation properties of dexamethasone coupled with
the appetite-stimulating properties was probably a better choice.

5cats
November 5th 05, 12:40 AM
cybercat wrote:

>
> "5cats" > wrote
>>>
>>> I've used 1/2 of a tab in cats that weighed as little 5# with no
>>> significant adverse effects. If your vet does prescribe 1/2 or 1/4
>>> tab of cyproheptadine or any other tablet, put it inside a #2 or #3
>>> gelcap- it masks the taste and eliminates the risk of the sharp
>>> edges of the cut tablet cutting or irritating the esophagus. Follow
>>> the gelcap with canned food or tuna water to make sure it goes all
>>> the way down.
>>>
>>> Phil
>>>
>>>
>>
>> I spoke with the vet this afternoon and she said that in her
>> experience antihistamines often don't work all that well for
>> allergies in cats, but we are still going to give it a trial. 1/2
>> tablet Chlortrimaton 2x a day.
>>
>> I just gave it to Pookie, crushed and mixed in with a tablespoon of
>> turkey baby food. (Since I had a jar of it around with no other use
>> for it right now.)
>
>
> So your vet agreed with my vet, at least as far as which antihistamine
> to use. Interesting. Whether it works or not probably depends on the
> cat. Even with humans the same medicine does not work the same on
> different people. Let us know how it works out.
>
>
>

So far, so good. She's let the sores on her tummy heal completely. And it
looks like maybe she's letting some of the fur grow back.

5cats
December 2nd 05, 03:04 AM
5cats wrote:

> cybercat wrote:
>
>>
>> "5cats" > wrote
>>>
>>> I spoke with the vet this afternoon and she said that in her
>>> experience antihistamines often don't work all that well for
>>> allergies in cats, but we are still going to give it a trial. 1/2
>>> tablet Chlortrimaton 2x a day.
>>>
>>> I just gave it to Pookie, crushed and mixed in with a tablespoon of
>>> turkey baby food. (Since I had a jar of it around with no other use
>>> for it right now.)
>>
>>
>> So your vet agreed with my vet, at least as far as which
>> antihistamine to use. Interesting. Whether it works or not probably
>> depends on the cat. Even with humans the same medicine does not work
>> the same on different people. Let us know how it works out.
>>
>>
>>
>
> So far, so good. She's let the sores on her tummy heal completely. And
> it looks like maybe she's letting some of the fur grow back.

Last update. We've discontinued the chlortrimeton as it did not prevent
the reoccurance of her hot-spots 2 times. She has let the sores heal
inbetween episodes.