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October 27th 05, 04:07 PM
Hi all.

My cat George has lost a tooth. He was meowing into my wife's face,
and she noticed that his usual Four Big Teeth smile was down to three.


My wife took George to our family vet, who gave George his shots (he
was due) and pronounced his teeth okay. The vet gave no explanation
why his tooth had come out. George is an indoor cat, and other than
fighting with the other two cats (George is the biggest and the only
male) nothing should have happened to him.

I made an appointment for George at our local university clinic. They
are planning to anesthetize him and carefully examine his teeth. The
family vet wasn't able to get a good look at George's mouth, even with
the help of an assistant, because he kept squirming.

This doctor visit will cost about $250, and my wife and son think it
will be money wasted. It has caused a controversy in our family.

Have you-all had experience with older cats losing teeth? Is it in
fact just "something that happens" and not worth concern? George is
thirteen, healthy, and is slowing down just a touch as he ages. (He no
longer rushes the door quite so enthusiastically to get out.)

War stories regarding older cats' teeth are welcomed.


Regards,

Rick

cybercat
October 27th 05, 04:11 PM
> wrote :
>
> I made an appointment for George at our local university clinic. They
> are planning to anesthetize him and carefully examine his teeth. The
> family vet wasn't able to get a good look at George's mouth, even with
> the help of an assistant, because he kept squirming.
>
> This doctor visit will cost about $250, and my wife and son think it
> will be money wasted. It has caused a controversy in our family.
>

You are right. George may be in pain, and bad teeth in cats, just
as in humans, can lead to bigger health problems. You are not
wasting money, you're being a good pet owner. Good for you!

October 27th 05, 06:44 PM
Thanks for the encouragement, Cybercat.

I still would like to know, what could make a cat's tooth fall out?

Has anybody else had their adult cat's tooth fall out?


Regards,

Rick

cybercat
October 27th 05, 06:57 PM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Thanks for the encouragement, Cybercat.

You're welcome, you're a good cat dad!
>
> I still would like to know, what could make a cat's tooth fall out?

Gum disease, same as humans. And I suppose tooth decay, too.

>
> Has anybody else had their adult cat's tooth fall out?
>

My RB cat had great teeth but her sister did not. At age 17 she turned up
missing a fang, and when we took her in we found that she had gum disease.

---MIKE---
October 27th 05, 11:20 PM
Rick wrote:

>>Has anybody else had their adult cat's
>> tooth fall out?

Amber, at age 10, lost one of her fangs. I then noticed that her breath
smelled awful. The vet gave her an antibiotic shot and scheduled her
for a dental a few days later. She has been fine since then. When she
lost the fang, I found it laying on the floor. I saved it!


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Spot
October 27th 05, 11:48 PM
I had a 10 yr old cat who cracked a tooth and it had to be extracted but he
never lost any other than his baby teeth.

Celeste

> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Thanks for the encouragement, Cybercat.
>
> I still would like to know, what could make a cat's tooth fall out?
>
> Has anybody else had their adult cat's tooth fall out?
>
>
> Regards,
>
> Rick
>

No More Retail
October 28th 05, 01:18 AM
Anything could have caused the cat to loss his tooth. If your cat has really
smelly breath it could be a sign of an abscess. The spot that he lost his
tooth could have an under lying infection. Best thing is to do what you are
doing.
Personally I would tell your wife and son it is money well spent they don't
like it tell them tough [email protected] how would they like it next time that they are
hury and you told them they were not going to see a doctor

Mariebmk
October 28th 05, 04:06 PM
I was told that older cats exhibit a behavior where they start pretty
much absorbing their own teeth. No one knows why, but as a result they
will start losing their teeth. Its quite painful for them. My poor
old cat (age 14) before I had to put him down was down to about 5
teeth. The vet said that his gums were in such pain that even when he
was under anestesia, they passed a finger over his gums and he had a
"shudder response" to the pain. I think the dental appointement is
well worth the money as cats will try to hide their pain so much your
poor cat may be suffering with bad teeth.

Good luck!

November 2nd 05, 06:53 PM
Since people were so kind to answer, I should tell them the outcome.

George is scheduled for a dental examination this coming Monday. So I
guess that's not a medical "outcome" yet, but it's a social and
political "outcome."

Amazingly to me, after several days of quietly persisting, when I said
"George is going to get care and that's it," everybody said "Oh, okay,"
and seemed satisfied.

Regards,

Rick

November 8th 05, 05:22 PM
George had his exam yesterday. We got it done at the local
university's small animal clinic. It cost $680. (* Gasp! *) I guess
cats start out with 30 teeth. George went into the exam with a dozen
or so, and came out with 7. He only has one fang left.

Several of George's teeth had "resorbed." I guess the cat's body
replaces part of the tooth material with bone. Nobody knows why.

So several teeth had "crown amputations," where the root is good but
the crown is bad, and they cut the crown off. And one tooth was
extracted because it was rotten.

Interestingly, I asked the doctor about brushing George's teeth daily,
and he thought it wasn't worthwhile. George's main problem wasn't
periodontal disease. His plaque level was "moderate." And it's
annoying to both the cat and the owner. So okay.

Well, I just thought I'd tell you-all how it came out. Expensive.
George had a lot of work done. I'm not clear what the impact is on
George's long term health.

Thanks for your concern and input. Episode over.

Regards,

Rick

cybercat
November 8th 05, 05:30 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> George had his exam yesterday. We got it done at the local
> university's small animal clinic. It cost $680. (* Gasp! *)

That $680 is going to come back to you in dollars or favors over
and over again. You did a great thing, now George will not be in
pain and will not get sick from rotting teeth.


> I guess
> cats start out with 30 teeth. George went into the exam with a dozen
> or so, and came out with 7. He only has one fang left.

Wow, he must have had a LOT of problems. I am sure you added
years to his life.

>
> Several of George's teeth had "resorbed." I guess the cat's body
> replaces part of the tooth material with bone. Nobody knows why.

That is really weird.

>
> So several teeth had "crown amputations," where the root is good but
> the crown is bad, and they cut the crown off.

Don't they fill it or cover it? If not what is to keep it from decaying
because the enamel is gone? Just curious.

IBen Getiner
November 9th 05, 10:15 AM
wrote:
> Hi all.
>
> My cat George has lost a tooth. He was meowing into my wife's face,
> and she noticed that his usual Four Big Teeth smile was down to three.
>
>
> My wife took George to our family vet, who gave George his shots (he
> was due) and pronounced his teeth okay. The vet gave no explanation
> why his tooth had come out. George is an indoor cat, and other than
> fighting with the other two cats (George is the biggest and the only
> male) nothing should have happened to him.
>
> I made an appointment for George at our local university clinic. They
> are planning to anesthetize him and carefully examine his teeth. The
> family vet wasn't able to get a good look at George's mouth, even with
> the help of an assistant, because he kept squirming.
>
> This doctor visit will cost about $250, and my wife and son think it
> will be money wasted. It has caused a controversy in our family.
>
> Have you-all had experience with older cats losing teeth? Is it in
> fact just "something that happens" and not worth concern? George is
> thirteen, healthy, and is slowing down just a touch as he ages. (He no
> longer rushes the door quite so enthusiastically to get out.)
>
> War stories regarding older cats' teeth are welcomed.
>
>
> Regards,
>
> Rick

If you were George's age and had never brushed or flossed, what do you
THINK would happen to YOUR teeth? Friggin' dimwit. What kind of stupid
questions were these?



IBen

IBen Getiner
November 9th 05, 10:20 AM
wrote:
> Hi all.
>
> My cat George has lost a tooth. He was meowing into my wife's face,
> and she noticed that his usual Four Big Teeth smile was down to three.
>
>
> My wife took George to our family vet, who gave George his shots (he
> was due) and pronounced his teeth okay. The vet gave no explanation
> why his tooth had come out. George is an indoor cat, and other than
> fighting with the other two cats (George is the biggest and the only
> male) nothing should have happened to him.
>
> I made an appointment for George at our local university clinic. They
> are planning to anesthetize him and carefully examine his teeth. The
> family vet wasn't able to get a good look at George's mouth, even with
> the help of an assistant, because he kept squirming.
>
> This doctor visit will cost about $250, and my wife and son think it
> will be money wasted. It has caused a controversy in our family.
>
> Have you-all had experience with older cats losing teeth? Is it in
> fact just "something that happens" and not worth concern? George is
> thirteen, healthy, and is slowing down just a touch as he ages. (He no
> longer rushes the door quite so enthusiastically to get out.)
>
> War stories regarding older cats' teeth are welcomed.
>
>
> Regards,
>
> Rick

Oh, yeah.... And just what kind of living hell do you think that George
has been enjoying every day and every nite when those babies started to
abscess? You ought to be taken to task by the local animal authorities
for allowing his teeth to come to this. Appalling..


IBen

-L.
November 9th 05, 11:06 AM
wrote:
> George had his exam yesterday. We got it done at the local
> university's small animal clinic. It cost $680.

That's exorbitant for the work you describe below. I'd check out some
other vets for future reference.

(* Gasp! *) I guess
> cats start out with 30 teeth. George went into the exam with a dozen
> or so, and came out with 7. He only has one fang left.
>
> Several of George's teeth had "resorbed." I guess the cat's body
> replaces part of the tooth material with bone. Nobody knows why.
>
> So several teeth had "crown amputations," where the root is good but
> the crown is bad, and they cut the crown off. And one tooth was
> extracted because it was rotten.
>
> Interestingly, I asked the doctor about brushing George's teeth daily,
> and he thought it wasn't worthwhile. George's main problem wasn't
> periodontal disease. His plaque level was "moderate." And it's
> annoying to both the cat and the owner. So okay.
>
> Well, I just thought I'd tell you-all how it came out. Expensive.
> George had a lot of work done. I'm not clear what the impact is on
> George's long term health.

I hope they put him on antibiotics.
-L.

cybercat
November 9th 05, 03:44 PM
"-L." > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> wrote:
> > George had his exam yesterday. We got it done at the local
> > university's small animal clinic. It cost $680.
>
> That's exorbitant for the work you describe below. I'd check out some
> other vets for future reference.
>
> (* Gasp! *) I guess
> > cats start out with 30 teeth. George went into the exam with a dozen
> > or so, and came out with 7. He only has one fang left.
> >
> > Several of George's teeth had "resorbed." I guess the cat's body
> > replaces part of the tooth material with bone. Nobody knows why.
> >
> > So several teeth had "crown amputations," where the root is good but
> > the crown is bad, and they cut the crown off. And one tooth was
> > extracted because it was rotten.
> >
> > Interestingly, I asked the doctor about brushing George's teeth daily,
> > and he thought it wasn't worthwhile. George's main problem wasn't
> > periodontal disease. His plaque level was "moderate." And it's
> > annoying to both the cat and the owner. So okay.
> >
> > Well, I just thought I'd tell you-all how it came out. Expensive.
> > George had a lot of work done. I'm not clear what the impact is on
> > George's long term health.
>
> I hope they put him on antibiotics.
> -L.
>

Oh, no, I cannot imagine the vet would have done that. What an
idiotic thing to say.

-L.
November 9th 05, 06:03 PM
cybercat wrote:
> >
> > I hope they put him on antibiotics.
> > -L.
> >
>
> Oh, no, I cannot imagine the vet would have done that. What an
> idiotic thing to say.

You are the one who is clearly the idiot. Antibioitcs are ROUNTINELY
given after extensive dentals - for both humans and cats - especially
when there are extractions. Keep posting. Your lack of veterinary
knowledge is becoming quite hysterical.

-L.

cybercat
November 9th 05, 06:17 PM
"-L." > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> cybercat wrote:
> > >
> > > I hope they put him on antibiotics.
> > > -L.
> > >
> >
> > Oh, no, I cannot imagine the vet would have done that. What an
> > idiotic thing to say.
>
> You are the one who is clearly the idiot. Antibioitcs are ROUNTINELY
> given after extensive dentals

Exactly. Which is why it was idiotic for you to ask the question.

Stating the obvious does not enhance your credibility.

-L.
November 9th 05, 07:49 PM
cybercat wrote:
> "-L." > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> >
> > cybercat wrote:
> > > >
> > > > I hope they put him on antibiotics.
> > > > -L.
> > > >
> > >
> > > Oh, no, I cannot imagine the vet would have done that. What an
> > > idiotic thing to say.
> >
> > You are the one who is clearly the idiot. Antibioitcs are ROUNTINELY
> > given after extensive dentals
>
> Exactly. Which is why it was idiotic for you to ask the question.
>
> Stating the obvious does not enhance your credibility.

Nice backpedal. You stated "Oh, no, I cannot imagine the vet would
have done that. What an idiotic thing to say. " You *clearly* didn't
advocate antibiotics until I pointed out they are rountinely
prescribed. You have a history of having a hissy fit anytime I even
mention the word "antibiotic" - this was just another instance of your
hysterics.

You're not fooling anyone.

-L.

cybercat
November 9th 05, 11:02 PM
"-L." > wrote in message
ps.com...
>
> cybercat wrote:
> > "-L." > wrote in message
> > oups.com...
> > >
> > > cybercat wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > I hope they put him on antibiotics.
> > > > > -L.
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > > Oh, no, I cannot imagine the vet would have done that. What an
> > > > idiotic thing to say.
> > >
> > > You are the one who is clearly the idiot. Antibioitcs are ROUNTINELY
> > > given after extensive dentals
> >
> > Exactly. Which is why it was idiotic for you to ask the question.
> >
> > Stating the obvious does not enhance your credibility.
>
> Nice backpedal. You stated "Oh, no, I cannot imagine the vet would
> have done that. What an idiotic thing to say. " You *clearly* didn't
> advocate antibiotics until I pointed out they are rountinely
> prescribed.

That was sarcasm, genius.

You have a history of having a hissy fit anytime I even
> mention the word "antibiotic" - this was just another instance of your
> hysterics.

That's not me, Lyn.

>
> You're not fooling anyone.
>
> -L.
>

The fact that this does not follow and makes no sense
just underscores the fact that you are melting down.
Going psycho again. Try to calm down, Lyn. The
topic of discussion is cats.

You have a bad habit of acting out when you lose an argument.
It is a really bad habit. I understand that you are unhappy and need
to blow off steam somehow, but the fact is, if you need to name call
and rage in a discussion thread, chances are your argument is not
strong enough.

In any case, I am not engaging in any of this childish **** with you, so
you may rage until you pop a vein as long as it makes you feel better.
God knows you could not look any worse than you already to, so
knock yourself out.

-L.
November 10th 05, 01:10 AM
cybercat wrote:.
>
> That was sarcasm, genius.

No it wasn't and you know it. You got busted trying to do a backpedal.

>
> You have a history of having a hissy fit anytime I even
> > mention the word "antibiotic" - this was just another instance of your
> > hysterics.
>
> That's not me, Lyn.

Need I pull references? Don't be so stupid.

> The fact that this does not follow and makes no sense
> just underscores the fact that you are melting down.
> Going psycho again. Try to calm down, Lyn. The
> topic of discussion is cats.
>
> You have a bad habit of acting out when you lose an argument.
> It is a really bad habit. I understand that you are unhappy and need
> to blow off steam somehow, but the fact is, if you need to name call
> and rage in a discussion thread, chances are your argument is not
> strong enough. Blah blah blah blah. I'm dumb as a bag of hammers.

Riiiight...I am not the one following YOU around making snide comments
about the advice you give. Why don't you stick to that which you know
best: netcopping, stalking and crying and whining to the cops. Go
waste other people's time - I doubt anyone else here is interested.

-L.

November 11th 05, 05:49 PM
Hi Cybercat.

Thanks for the encouragement. We had to transfer money from the
"emergency" fund today to cover the mortgage. When there are
recriminations, I will repeat to myself "I am sure you added years to
his life."

Regarding crown amputations, they draw the gum material up over the
crown, and sew it in place. Later on, the stitches are absorbed, and
George is left with gums. This is how it's done, and this is a
teaching and research clinic that should be up on the latest
techniques. That's all I know.

I hope your cats are healthy and happy.

Regards,

Rick

cybercat
November 11th 05, 07:37 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> Hi Cybercat.
>
> Thanks for the encouragement. We had to transfer money from the
> "emergency" fund today to cover the mortgage. When there are
> recriminations, I will repeat to myself "I am sure you added years to
> his life."

<G> I know there are other things you needed to do with that money,
but you know you did the right thing--and in my experience, this kind
of generosity toward those who need help honestly does come back
to you tenfold. So you get to do the right thing and you "get yours"
in the end, too! It's a win-win situation!
>
> Regarding crown amputations, they draw the gum material up over the
> crown, and sew it in place. Later on, the stitches are absorbed, and
> George is left with gums. This is how it's done, and this is a
> teaching and research clinic that should be up on the latest
> techniques. That's all I know.

Hmm, interesting. I had no idea. I try to brush my cats' teeth regularly
so that they might not develop gum or tooth problems--I have to admit
that I am too afraid to take them for preventive dentals because the
possible complications of anesthesia worry me. But one day they might
need some care so it's good to know what can be done.

>
> I hope your cats are healthy and happy.
>

Thank you, Rick! My two girls are happy and well, downstairs at the
big backyard window watching the chipmunks and the blue jays wage war.
Cat tv! :)