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October 29th 05, 09:24 PM
We have 2 cats, one is 19 and one is about 13. My 19 year old seems to
be declining rapidly. He has been deaf for about 1 year, and has been
on hyperthyroid meds for about 1.5 years. He has lost a lot of weight,
which prompted the vet to increase his tapazole dose; now he is
maintaining his weight, although he is skinny. All other blood work
was normal for his age.

He eats well and enjoys a good cuddle and scratches.

However, he has had issues with peeing outside the box. He did not
have an infection, we checked with the vet. I solved the problem for a
few weeks by moving boxes and placing new ones in favorite pee spots.
He has a hard time with one of his back legs and actually will only put
3 legs in the box. The pee runs out of the box, but I have plastic
down and paper on top so I dont mind. DH also cut out the front wall
from the boxes so he would step in easier. But, this week he started
peeing on the carpet in my bedroom. Then he peed in my bed, right in
front of me. I was at my wit's end. I had to keep the cats out of the
room, which I hate. My younger cat is a big cuddler, and I hate to do
this. But how much more pee can I take? Especially in my bed. He has
access to the rest of the house, and other places to sleep.

I think he may be senile, since he has developed other odd behaviours,
like sticking his paw in the toilet and swishing around (this was a cat
that NEVER drank from or came near the toilet). He has access to
several water bowls up and downstairs. I love him so much, but I fear
his quality of life is going downhill fast. But, at the same time, I
feel I owe it to him (while he is still eating and purring) to keep him
around until he dies of natural causes. I am really wrestling here and
I cant make a decision. I guess I need any input those who have has
experience with very old cats could give. TIA beth

Spot
October 29th 05, 09:48 PM
19 is a long life for a cat but before I would make that decision I would
research on if the increased dose of tapazole can cause bladder problems. I
say this because I had an asthmatic cat who did OK on one dose of
theophylline but when it was increased during asthma attacks she would often
pee in inappropriate places. It took us a while to figure the problem out
but I finally put it together and just kept her confined to a room with
linoleum when I needed to.

Celeste



> wrote in message
oups.com...
> We have 2 cats, one is 19 and one is about 13. My 19 year old seems to
> be declining rapidly. He has been deaf for about 1 year, and has been
> on hyperthyroid meds for about 1.5 years. He has lost a lot of weight,
> which prompted the vet to increase his tapazole dose; now he is
> maintaining his weight, although he is skinny. All other blood work
> was normal for his age.
>
> He eats well and enjoys a good cuddle and scratches.
>
> However, he has had issues with peeing outside the box. He did not
> have an infection, we checked with the vet. I solved the problem for a
> few weeks by moving boxes and placing new ones in favorite pee spots.
> He has a hard time with one of his back legs and actually will only put
> 3 legs in the box. The pee runs out of the box, but I have plastic
> down and paper on top so I dont mind. DH also cut out the front wall
> from the boxes so he would step in easier. But, this week he started
> peeing on the carpet in my bedroom. Then he peed in my bed, right in
> front of me. I was at my wit's end. I had to keep the cats out of the
> room, which I hate. My younger cat is a big cuddler, and I hate to do
> this. But how much more pee can I take? Especially in my bed. He has
> access to the rest of the house, and other places to sleep.
>
> I think he may be senile, since he has developed other odd behaviours,
> like sticking his paw in the toilet and swishing around (this was a cat
> that NEVER drank from or came near the toilet). He has access to
> several water bowls up and downstairs. I love him so much, but I fear
> his quality of life is going downhill fast. But, at the same time, I
> feel I owe it to him (while he is still eating and purring) to keep him
> around until he dies of natural causes. I am really wrestling here and
> I cant make a decision. I guess I need any input those who have has
> experience with very old cats could give. TIA beth
>

John Doe
October 29th 05, 09:52 PM
wrote:

....
> I love him so much, but I fear
> his quality of life is going downhill fast. But, at the same
> time, I feel I owe it to him (while he is still eating and
> purring) to keep him around until he dies of natural causes. I am
> really wrestling here and I cant make a decision. I guess I need
> any input those who have has experience with very old cats could
> give.

Others have better advice, but I have paid close attention to
reading about that. Apparently if you wait too long, you have the
risk of a very unpleasant death (but I am sure that depends on a
thousand variables).

Wouldn't it be nice if they just went peacefully in their sleep.

There are extremely cruel things happening every day in the wild.
Euthanasia is not cruel.

Good luck.

Joe Canuck
October 29th 05, 09:52 PM
wrote:

> We have 2 cats, one is 19 and one is about 13. My 19 year old seems to
> be declining rapidly. He has been deaf for about 1 year, and has been
> on hyperthyroid meds for about 1.5 years. He has lost a lot of weight,
> which prompted the vet to increase his tapazole dose; now he is
> maintaining his weight, although he is skinny. All other blood work
> was normal for his age.
>
> He eats well and enjoys a good cuddle and scratches.
>
> However, he has had issues with peeing outside the box. He did not
> have an infection, we checked with the vet. I solved the problem for a
> few weeks by moving boxes and placing new ones in favorite pee spots.
> He has a hard time with one of his back legs and actually will only put
> 3 legs in the box. The pee runs out of the box, but I have plastic
> down and paper on top so I dont mind. DH also cut out the front wall
> from the boxes so he would step in easier. But, this week he started
> peeing on the carpet in my bedroom. Then he peed in my bed, right in
> front of me. I was at my wit's end. I had to keep the cats out of the
> room, which I hate. My younger cat is a big cuddler, and I hate to do
> this. But how much more pee can I take? Especially in my bed. He has
> access to the rest of the house, and other places to sleep.
>
> I think he may be senile, since he has developed other odd behaviours,
> like sticking his paw in the toilet and swishing around (this was a cat
> that NEVER drank from or came near the toilet). He has access to
> several water bowls up and downstairs. I love him so much, but I fear
> his quality of life is going downhill fast. But, at the same time, I
> feel I owe it to him (while he is still eating and purring) to keep him
> around until he dies of natural causes. I am really wrestling here and
> I cant make a decision. I guess I need any input those who have has
> experience with very old cats could give. TIA beth
>

The only thing you can do about peeing outside the box is to manage the
issue as best you can and, unfortunately, if that means keeping him out
of certain rooms then so be it. You cannot have your house and
furnishings destroyed.

If there is no physical reason for the peeing then you are very likely
right regarding the odd behaviors, the inappropriate peeing is just
another manifestation of that.

If you think he is suffering, it may be kinder to let him go and have
him put out of the misery.

Wrestling with this issue is difficult. Take care.

No More Retail
October 29th 05, 10:03 PM
3 things first have you researched the medication the cat is on if so are
there any side effects that would resemble the problems 2nd is there
anything that would interact with the medication that you have game him 3rd
does the vet give any advice about this or is the vet stumped about it

I have a 19 year old cat precious is her name a black and white long hair
Himalayan and has always weighed 4-5 lbs done to 3 now. She has become
senile she walks around and howls a the top of her lungs for no reason and
continues to do it till you touch her on the head than she acts perfectly
normal. She has done the peeing thing right in front of us Our vet said
remember how old she is they have accidents just like older people do hence
adult diapers.

Is he peeing in the same spot on the carpet; if so he can still sense the
odor or all over in different spots
He has access to the rest of the house how is he acting there

http://www.fanciers.com/cat-faqs/behavior.shtml

You cat sound like it still has a very good quality of life you are just
going to have to deal with it. Would you put your parents down just because
they got weird in their old age

You got some choices to make
can you confine the cat to an area that can be easily clean up at night to
allow the other cat to come in to your bed
you can bring the other cat into your room and allow the older cat to have
free roam of the house if he is not having a bathroom problem there
you can get diapers which means a mess like babies do
you can put the cat down; which from what I read should not be done unless
you and your vet completely agree logically and in your heart that the
quality of the cats life is gone and he is suffering :-(

Gail
October 29th 05, 10:31 PM
Was he tested for diabetes?
Gail
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> We have 2 cats, one is 19 and one is about 13. My 19 year old seems to
> be declining rapidly. He has been deaf for about 1 year, and has been
> on hyperthyroid meds for about 1.5 years. He has lost a lot of weight,
> which prompted the vet to increase his tapazole dose; now he is
> maintaining his weight, although he is skinny. All other blood work
> was normal for his age.
>
> He eats well and enjoys a good cuddle and scratches.
>
> However, he has had issues with peeing outside the box. He did not
> have an infection, we checked with the vet. I solved the problem for a
> few weeks by moving boxes and placing new ones in favorite pee spots.
> He has a hard time with one of his back legs and actually will only put
> 3 legs in the box. The pee runs out of the box, but I have plastic
> down and paper on top so I dont mind. DH also cut out the front wall
> from the boxes so he would step in easier. But, this week he started
> peeing on the carpet in my bedroom. Then he peed in my bed, right in
> front of me. I was at my wit's end. I had to keep the cats out of the
> room, which I hate. My younger cat is a big cuddler, and I hate to do
> this. But how much more pee can I take? Especially in my bed. He has
> access to the rest of the house, and other places to sleep.
>
> I think he may be senile, since he has developed other odd behaviours,
> like sticking his paw in the toilet and swishing around (this was a cat
> that NEVER drank from or came near the toilet). He has access to
> several water bowls up and downstairs. I love him so much, but I fear
> his quality of life is going downhill fast. But, at the same time, I
> feel I owe it to him (while he is still eating and purring) to keep him
> around until he dies of natural causes. I am really wrestling here and
> I cant make a decision. I guess I need any input those who have has
> experience with very old cats could give. TIA beth
>

Rhonda
October 30th 05, 05:30 AM
Hi Beth,

People already gave you good ideas -- sounds like a medical problem.

Our newest cat is going through a bladder infection right now, and it is
distressing how they can pee and leak urine all over. I keep thinking
that however distressing it is for us, it is much more for him.

If your cat tested negative for bladder infection, Megan on this group
(and my vet) told me about another condition called interstitial
cystitis that has the same symptoms. It's a problem with the bladder
lining and the cat can have flare-ups due to stress. her post is here:

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.pets.cats.health+behav/msg/070f48d478088997

You know your cat best, but if he is otherwise feeling good and eating,
I personally couldn't think about euthanasia because of the peeing. I
would think of that more as a clue that something's wrong, and you need
to do a little detective work even if it involves a second vet opinion.

In the meantime, I have found that plastic shower curtain liners are
very cheap, and work well to cover the beds, furniture, etc. :) Another
good thing is a fitted plastic mattress cover to go under the sheets.

Good luck!

Rhonda



wrote:

> He eats well and enjoys a good cuddle and scratches.

whitershadeofpale
October 30th 05, 07:26 AM
wrote:
> We have ... I need any input those who have has
> experience with very old cats could give. TIA beth

Hello

Hey! Sorry to hear about your cat.

I fillled out an health ?'aire, it asked me about my relatives

It asked me the cause of death, I listed OLD AGE.

When I got to the bottom of the page, it said in bold letters.

"Don't put --OLD AGE-- as the cause of death".

Like a slow leak in a tire, still rolling but loosing pressure all the
while.

This was one reason I thought I would not get another cat, I know at
some point I may have to say goodbye to it. And that really stinks.
Then I thought, well, if I have to say goodbye again, it would be nice
if it was peaceful for the cat.

If the worst he is doing is peeing outside the box, and he is not in
discomfort...I'd keep him for now. You know. I mean, putting him to
sleep can be done in a day...(if it comes to him living in pain).

I'd wait till the cat was uncomfortable, or...yule know when the time
is getting close, I think the cat will also let you know.

Best to ya's

October 31st 05, 03:21 AM
I love him so much, but I fear
his quality of life is going downhill fast. But, at the same time, I
feel I owe it to him (while he is still eating and purring) to keep him

around until he dies of natural causes. I am really wrestling here and

I cant make a decision. I guess I need any input those who have has
experience with very old cats could give. TIA beth

My tabby was entered into rest at 16.5 years old. I would like you to
know that he had no chronic health problems 'till 14 (he did have an
isolated incidence of a severe type of anemia at about 10) at which
time he developed hyperthyroidism, which I elected to treat with
Tapezole. Shortly thereafter, he developed problems with constipation
and a series of bladder obstructions (no stones).

Within maybe six months, I got all this under control with the help of
my veterinarians.

Unfortunately, he developed a cancer of the spinal cord at 16. But, in
spite of that, he lived a comfortable last six months of his life:
purring, happy and eating well as you relate. I had him on home
treatment: his Tapezole, fluids, special diets, laxatives, and some
steriods as required and he did just fine.

The veterinarian told me that I would know when the time was right if I
had to make that difficult decision (or that I could be assured that
she would let me know).

She was exactly right - I did know because I wanted the very best for
my friend and I waited for him to tell me and he did. He came to a
point very suddenly where there was no doubt what the right thing was
to do and no one had to tell me. I took him to my veterinarian right
away and she helped me over the next day to make this transition - for
him and for me.

The last six months of his life continue to be a solace to me.

God bless you at this most difficult time.