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John Doe
October 30th 05, 06:36 AM
Mine do.

If I want Kiki's attention away from food/similar, I have to be stern
about it. But if I want Kiki to come when she is not busy, all I have
to do is gently call her and maybe stretch out my arms in a welcoming
fashion.

Kitty does too, but maybe not as easily.

LarryW
October 30th 05, 10:03 AM
Currently both of my cats respond to their names and selected phrases
like "din-din time" & other phrases they associate with corresponding
activities - "night-night," "playtime." When I say "pick it up," they
both fly in different directions usually. When they don't run away,
you can be sure that they DO want you to pick them up.

LarryW


"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
> Mine do.
>
> If I want Kiki's attention away from food/similar, I have to be
stern
> about it. But if I want Kiki to come when she is not busy, all I
have
> to do is gently call her and maybe stretch out my arms in a
welcoming
> fashion.
>
> Kitty does too, but maybe not as easily.

Joe Canuck
October 30th 05, 01:59 PM
John Doe wrote:

> Mine do.
>
> If I want Kiki's attention away from food/similar, I have to be stern
> about it. But if I want Kiki to come when she is not busy, all I have
> to do is gently call her and maybe stretch out my arms in a welcoming
> fashion.
>
> Kitty does too, but maybe not as easily.

Absolutely.

When I have been out, mine will come running to greet me when she hears
the outside door opening.

No matter where I am in the house, she will come running when I call.
However, sometimes she plays tricks on me. I will call... no Molly. I
will find out a few minutes later that she was hiding out behind a chair
or something with a head peeking out looking right at me as though to
say... "whatdaya want? I'm right here!"

chas
October 30th 05, 05:05 PM
Dogs come when they are called.

Cats take a message and get back to you.

chas

.oO rach Oo.
October 30th 05, 05:15 PM
It depends. They will both respond to their names or a clicking sound I make
with my tongue ( like a tut tut tut noise) or the word TUNA. Otherwise, if
they aren't interested in moving, they ignore me.

--
..oO rach Oo.


"LarryW" > wrote in message
m...
> Currently both of my cats respond to their names and selected phrases
> like "din-din time" & other phrases they associate with corresponding
> activities - "night-night," "playtime." When I say "pick it up," they
> both fly in different directions usually. When they don't run away,
> you can be sure that they DO want you to pick them up.
>
> LarryW
>
>
> "John Doe" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Mine do.
>>
>> If I want Kiki's attention away from food/similar, I have to be
> stern
>> about it. But if I want Kiki to come when she is not busy, all I
> have
>> to do is gently call her and maybe stretch out my arms in a
> welcoming
>> fashion.
>>
>> Kitty does too, but maybe not as easily.
>
>

whitershadeofpale
October 30th 05, 07:16 PM
John Doe wrote:
> Mine do.
>
> If I want Kiki's attention away from food/similar, I have to be stern
> about it. But if I want Kiki to come when she is not busy, all I have
> to do is gently call her and maybe stretch out my arms in a welcoming
> fashion.
>
> Kitty does too, but maybe not as easily.

l i a r

John Doe
October 30th 05, 08:06 PM
"whitershadeofpale" > wrote:
> John Doe wrote:

>> Mine do.
>> If I want Kiki's attention away from food/similar, I have to be
>> stern about it. But if I want Kiki to come when she is not busy,
>> all I have to do is gently call her and maybe stretch out my arms
>> in a welcoming fashion.
>> Kitty does too, but maybe not as easily.

> l i a r

Your lack of faith troubles me, young Skywalker

Rebecca Root
October 30th 05, 08:30 PM
Basically, no. If my calling happens when they'd otherwise like to be
with me, they'll come, but they can be across the room from me and not
come over if I call them. They have to perceive some immediate
advantage first.

Some examples of calling that work:

When I come home, they usually meet me at the door having heard the car
pull up. If they happen not to have heard (eg asleep) they will come
running when I call. Usually at home they gravitate to the same floor
of the house as me, but will sometimes be separated for awhile if they
fall asleep and I move on. If I call then, they'll come. Any calling
that involves waving a favorite toy usually works.

Calling that almost never works:
Cat already elsewhere in the same room as me, and me not offering any
sign of special treats or attention, just calling name.

Calling that never works:
Cat in the middle of doing something fun, naughty or both. Only a big
"No" works then, and that doesn't count as calling them.

A cat I used to have, named Thackeray, would call me. He was an
indoor/outdoor cat and would always give a loud "meaow" when he first
came in - it was a particular meaow that meant me. I'd call back
"Thackie-cat" from whereever I was in the house and he'd come running.
In warm weather, he'd usually be out when I was at work, and he
definately knew the sound of my car and would come to the front steps
when he heard me coming home. While I had him, I sold that car and got
a new one and he looked reproachful at me for tricking him with a
different car. It took him about 3 days to learn the new car sound.

whitershadeofpale
October 30th 05, 10:29 PM
John Doe wrote:
> "whitershadeofpale" > wrote:
> > John Doe wrote:
>
> >> Mine do.
> >> If I want Kiki's attention away from food/similar, I have to be
> >> stern about it. But if I want Kiki to come when she is not busy,
> >> all I have to do is gently call her and maybe stretch out my arms
> >> in a welcoming fashion.
> >> Kitty does too, but maybe not as easily.
>
> > l i a r
>
> Your lack of faith troubles me, young Skywalker

well i wuz gettin glow on cash so I had to donate a few midichlorians
it's going for $2,000.00 a thimble full these days

Paul M. Cook
October 31st 05, 12:11 AM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
> Mine do.
>
> If I want Kiki's attention away from food/similar, I have to be stern
> about it. But if I want Kiki to come when she is not busy, all I have
> to do is gently call her and maybe stretch out my arms in a welcoming
> fashion.
>
> Kitty does too, but maybe not as easily.

One of my cats does. He is very good about that. I encourage the behavior
by always giving him a reason to come running. A big hug, a lot of petting,
cat treats. He always knows something fun will be waiting for him.

The other cat - he looks at me and thinks "yeah right pal, dream on."

Paul

October 31st 05, 03:12 AM
My cat comes when called in. She waits for me to call her then gallops
in at a trot. It's almost as if I'm saying the coast is clear, it's
safe to come in. Where we are at, there have been, stray feral cats
when I least expected it. The cats are not hostile but unfortunately my
cat is hostile or cops an attitutde.

DevilsPGD
October 31st 05, 03:35 AM
In message > John Doe
> wrote:

>Mine do.
>
>If I want Kiki's attention away from food/similar, I have to be stern
>about it. But if I want Kiki to come when she is not busy, all I have
>to do is gently call her and maybe stretch out my arms in a welcoming
>fashion.

Both of mine will look over to see if there is any reason they should
come.

However, I've been training them using a clicking sound (from my mouth)
whenever I feed them or give them treats -- If I do that, they both come
running (And they always get something, either treats or positive
attention, but usually treats)

--
Men are from Earth. Women are from Earth. Deal with it.

Mike
October 31st 05, 05:21 AM
Absolutely. A lot of it has to do with the voice inflection, however. If I
simply say, "Calypso, come here," in a normal, direct voice, she ignores me.
But if I raise the pitch of my voice and musically call her name in the way
in which she is familiar, she comes right away.

Mike

"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
> Mine do.
>
> If I want Kiki's attention away from food/similar, I have to be stern
> about it. But if I want Kiki to come when she is not busy, all I have
> to do is gently call her and maybe stretch out my arms in a welcoming
> fashion.
>
> Kitty does too, but maybe not as easily.

Brian Link
October 31st 05, 05:35 AM
On Sun, 30 Oct 2005 07:59:58 -0500, Joe Canuck
> wrote:

>John Doe wrote:
>
>> Mine do.
>>
>> If I want Kiki's attention away from food/similar, I have to be stern
>> about it. But if I want Kiki to come when she is not busy, all I have
>> to do is gently call her and maybe stretch out my arms in a welcoming
>> fashion.
>>
>> Kitty does too, but maybe not as easily.
>
>Absolutely.
>
>When I have been out, mine will come running to greet me when she hears
>the outside door opening.
>
>No matter where I am in the house, she will come running when I call.
>However, sometimes she plays tricks on me. I will call... no Molly. I
>will find out a few minutes later that she was hiding out behind a chair
>or something with a head peeking out looking right at me as though to
>say... "whatdaya want? I'm right here!"

Louis the Bengal comes immediately when called. And if I go outside,
he'll howl like a banshee. When I come home he'll trot up like a
golden retriever or something.

Still pees on doors occasionally, but I wouldn't trade him for the
world.

BLink

November 3rd 05, 12:15 AM
My cat (a siamese) does the same. If I call him he will get out of a
hidden place meowing very gently (it sounds like he is asking 'what?').
He always come to greet me in the door. In fact, he is developing quite
a vocabulary. I have small "conversations" with him. I say something
and he answers back in the same tone. My husband laughs a lot. He is of
course learning to 'say' the right thing to get what he wants. If he
does not want to be hold, for example, he gives a light crying meow.
The funny thing is that before I adopted him he used to belong to a
lady which recently passed away. He did not "talk" at all then. Funny
cat.

John Doe
November 15th 05, 06:41 PM
"LarryW" > wrote:

> ... When I say "pick it up," they both fly in different directions
> usually. When they don't run away, you can be sure that they DO
> want you to pick them up.

I like to give my cats verbal/audible warning before touching them.
Giving them some distinct audible warning before picking them up
sounds like a good idea to me too. Thanks.

whitershadeofpale
November 15th 05, 10:30 PM
John Doe wrote:

> I like to give my cats verbal/audible warning before touching them.
> Giving them some distinct audible warning before picking them up
> sounds like a good idea to me too. Thanks.

sounds like you got lace on your underwear there bud!

John Doe
November 16th 05, 03:38 AM
tough guy wanna-be troll

"whitershadeofpale" > wrote:

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> From: "whitershadeofpale" >
> Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> Subject: Re: Does your cat come when you call it?
> Date: 15 Nov 2005 13:30:23 -0800
> Organization: http://groups.google.com
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>
>
> John Doe wrote:
>
>> I like to give my cats verbal/audible warning before touching them.
>> Giving them some distinct audible warning before picking them up
>> sounds like a good idea to me too. Thanks.
>
> sounds like you got lace on your underwear there bud!
>
>
>

whitershadeofpale
November 16th 05, 10:38 AM
Brandy Alexandre wrote:

>
> I give Kami hand signals as far as what I'm closing in for. if it's
> pkayful, I display a "scritch," if it for loving it's a lovin'
> spoonful." If she's being timid I'm very careful that she knows what
> I'm coming for. If it's something she's not going to like, I try to
> give a give, whoch in itself is a sign and she knows to run. Bur, I
> don't want to give her a false sign and ruin our trust.
>

Why do I want to say
BULL****?

> Brandy AlexandreŽ
> http://www.swydm.com/?refer=BrandyAlx
> Well, would you?

John Doe
November 16th 05, 12:25 PM
"whitershadeofpale" > wrote:

> Brandy Alexandre wrote:
>
>>
>> I give Kami hand signals as far as what I'm closing in for. if
>> it's pkayful, I display a "scritch," if it for loving it's a
>> lovin' spoonful." If she's being timid I'm very careful that she
>> knows what I'm coming for. If it's something she's not going to
>> like, I try to give a give, whoch in itself is a sign and she
>> knows to run. Bur, I don't want to give her a false sign and
>> ruin our trust.
>>
>
> Why do I want to say
> BULL****?

Cats greatly depend on thier nerves (and ears). The reason I speak
before touching (unless they know I am right there) is to help avoid
dulling their senses. My cats trust me and I respect their need to
maintain situational awareness because their life could depend on
it. Cats are very sensitive to touch, especially first contact.




>
>
>
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> From: "whitershadeofpale" >
> Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> Subject: Re: Does your cat come when you call it?
> Date: 16 Nov 2005 01:38:59 -0800
> Organization: http://groups.google.com
> Lines: 19
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>
>

whitershadeofpale
November 16th 05, 12:38 PM
John Doe wrote:

> Cats greatly depend on thier nerves (and ears). The reason I speak
> before touching (unless they know I am right there) is to help avoid
> dulling their senses. My cats trust me and I respect their need to
> maintain situational awareness because their life could depend on
> it. Cats are very sensitive to touch, especially first contact.

what's that got to do with the price of tea in china

I say, buck bald naked stipper lady is full of it

she goes "I don't wanna give the wrong signal"?

woo woo!

nope, just not buying it!

AND YOU! ENCOURAGING HER!

damn trolls!

whitershadeofpale
November 16th 05, 12:54 PM
whitershadeofpale wrote:

> what's that got to do with the price of tea in china
>
> I say, buck bald naked stipper lady is full of it
>
> she goes "I don't wanna give the wrong signal"?
>
> woo woo!
>
> nope, just not buying it!
>
> AND YOU! ENCOURAGING HER!
>
> damn trolls!

Im just playing Brandy! I believe you

Iiii think John Doe Like You!
yep!
dontcha JD