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CatNipped
October 31st 05, 02:39 PM
Jessie got a small scratch on her paw pad. I tried to dab it with peroxide
on a cotton ball, but she was having no part of it. DH suggested putting
some peroxide in a small bowl and then dipping her paw into that. I didn't
want to get her fur soaked in peroxide - I know licking off the little bit
of peroxide that would be applied with a cotton ball wouldn't hurt her, but
licking off the amount that would be soaking the fur of her foot might.

Does anyone here know if peroxide, in any amount, will harm a cat if
ingested?

CatNipped

cybercat
October 31st 05, 06:07 PM
"CatNipped" > wrote in message
...
> Jessie got a small scratch on her paw pad. I tried to dab it with
peroxide
> on a cotton ball, but she was having no part of it.

I think I would use a very small amount of alcohol if I didn't have anything
from the vet.

MaryL
November 1st 05, 12:15 AM
"Diane" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> "CatNipped" > wrote:
>
>> Jessie got a small scratch on her paw pad. I tried to dab it with
>> peroxide
>> on a cotton ball, but she was having no part of it. DH suggested putting
>> some peroxide in a small bowl and then dipping her paw into that. I
>> didn't
>> want to get her fur soaked in peroxide - I know licking off the little
>> bit
>> of peroxide that would be applied with a cotton ball wouldn't hurt her,
>> but
>> licking off the amount that would be soaking the fur of her foot might.
>>
>> Does anyone here know if peroxide, in any amount, will harm a cat if
>> ingested?
>
> I've read in a text for nurses not to use peroxide as a disinfectant (on
> humans). It's ineffective, and there's potential for it to get into the
> bloodstream. I would use something else.
> --
> Web site: http://www.slywy.com/
> Message board: http://www.slywy.com/phpBB2/
> Journal: http://slywy.diaryland.com/

I used to use hydrogen peroxide to cleanse my own wounds -- it seemed to
"bubble out" any dirt. However, my doctor later told me *not* to use it
because cuts and abrasions may not heal as well if proxide is used. He
recommended Betadine instead, and I notice that Megan says that is also what
she uses for her cats.

MaryL

November 1st 05, 01:18 AM
MaryL wrote:
> "Diane" > wrote in message
> ...
> > In article >,
> > "CatNipped" > wrote:
> >
> >> Jessie got a small scratch on her paw pad. I tried to dab it with
> >> peroxide
> >> on a cotton ball, but she was having no part of it. DH suggested putting
> >> some peroxide in a small bowl and then dipping her paw into that. I
> >> didn't
> >> want to get her fur soaked in peroxide - I know licking off the little
> >> bit
> >> of peroxide that would be applied with a cotton ball wouldn't hurt her,
> >> but
> >> licking off the amount that would be soaking the fur of her foot might.
> >>
> >> Does anyone here know if peroxide, in any amount, will harm a cat if
> >> ingested?
> >
> > I've read in a text for nurses not to use peroxide as a disinfectant (on
> > humans). It's ineffective, and there's potential for it to get into the
> > bloodstream. I would use something else.
> > --
> > Web site: http://www.slywy.com/
> > Message board: http://www.slywy.com/phpBB2/
> > Journal: http://slywy.diaryland.com/
>
> I used to use hydrogen peroxide to cleanse my own wounds -- it seemed to
> "bubble out" any dirt. However, my doctor later told me *not* to use it
> because cuts and abrasions may not heal as well if proxide is used. He
> recommended Betadine instead, and I notice that Megan says that is also what
> she uses for her cats.
>
> MaryL

That's what the docs at the wound care clinic say. Never use peroxide
on a wound, especially if it's trying to heal. It destroys new cell
growth. Weirdly enough, they use honey on certain infected wounds.
Honey has low-level hydrogen peroxide properties and other
healing/antibacterial qualities. It's not regular honey out of a jar, I
think it is specially filtered or something for pharmaceutical use, but
it's still honey made by bees.

Sherry

Rhonda
November 1st 05, 05:54 AM
wrote:

> That's what the docs at the wound care clinic say. Never use peroxide
> on a wound, especially if it's trying to heal. It destroys new cell
> growth. Weirdly enough, they use honey on certain infected wounds.
> Honey has low-level hydrogen peroxide properties and other
> healing/antibacterial qualities. It's not regular honey out of a jar, I
> think it is specially filtered or something for pharmaceutical use, but
> it's still honey made by bees.


I'm surprised they said to never use peroxide on a wound. I do when the
wound is new and/or dirty. I especially us it on cat bites or scratches.
It is an excellent cleaner. It does destroy any scabbing that's trying
to happen, so I just use it the first time. After that, I use an
antibiotic cream or alcohol.

Rhonda

-L.
November 1st 05, 09:38 AM
Rhonda wrote:
>
> I'm surprised they said to never use peroxide on a wound. I do when the
> wound is new and/or dirty. I especially us it on cat bites or scratches.
> It is an excellent cleaner. It does destroy any scabbing that's trying
> to happen, so I just use it the first time. After that, I use an
> antibiotic cream or alcohol.
>
> Rhonda

I think the whole "don't use peroxide" thing has been blown out of
proportion. Peroxide is ok to use if you use it once or twice - the
problem arises when you use it over and over time after time on the
same wound. The problem with commercial antibiotic creams being used
on cats is that they cause the wound to go anerobic because they are
usually in a petrolatum base/carrier, which block air from getting to
the wound. Cat wounds (especially bites) are notorious for becoming
infected with anerobic bacteria. You (general you) should always use a
topical antibiotic prescribed by a doctor like Tresaderm, which is in a
non-petroleum base. If you don't have any available, and the wound is
small it is acceptable to clean the wound once with peroxide to help
stop the bleeding, and then allow it to dry. The cat will lick it to
keep it clean. Puncture or larger-sized wounds should be seen by a vet
because the potential for abscess is great.

-L.

Phil P.
November 1st 05, 10:00 AM
"CatNipped" > wrote in message
...
> Jessie got a small scratch on her paw pad. I tried to dab it with
peroxide
> on a cotton ball, but she was having no part of it. DH suggested putting
> some peroxide in a small bowl and then dipping her paw into that. I
didn't
> want to get her fur soaked in peroxide - I know licking off the little bit
> of peroxide that would be applied with a cotton ball wouldn't hurt her,
but
> licking off the amount that would be soaking the fur of her foot might.
>
> Does anyone here know if peroxide, in any amount, will harm a cat if
> ingested?


I don't use peroxide on cats. Get a bottle of *veterinary* betadine
solution (turquoise squeeze bottle). Your vet will probably give you some
to hold you until you order a bottle. In a pinch, you can use human
betadine- diluted 1 part to 10 parts water.

Phil

cybercat
November 1st 05, 05:10 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> wrote:
>
> > That's what the docs at the wound care clinic say. Never use peroxide
> > on a wound, especially if it's trying to heal. It destroys new cell
> > growth. Weirdly enough, they use honey on certain infected wounds.
> > Honey has low-level hydrogen peroxide properties and other
> > healing/antibacterial qualities. It's not regular honey out of a jar, I
> > think it is specially filtered or something for pharmaceutical use, but
> > it's still honey made by bees.
>
>
> I'm surprised they said to never use peroxide on a wound. I do when the
> wound is new and/or dirty. I especially us it on cat bites or scratches.
> It is an excellent cleaner. It does destroy any scabbing that's trying
> to happen, so I just use it the first time. After that, I use an
> antibiotic cream or alcohol.
>

According to my doctor, peroxide has come under suspicion lately
as a carcinogen. That is why we are hearing more and more that
we should use other things to clean wounds. That said, it is
excellent for cleaning wounds that may be infected primarily
*because* it destroys tissue. So if a wound is infected it
essentially eats up the infected tissue. However, beyond a
single application, you don't want to destroy tissue every
time you disinfect a cut.

My dentist told me never to use it as a mouthwash, for
precisely that reason. He said, "I can tell when patients'
are using it, even dilute, because I can see their gum
tissue sloughing off." So, it works as a disinfectant
but a little too well in that it kills healthy tissue. I therefore
never use it as a mouthwash but almost always if I think
a cut looks infective: once or twice. Then it's alcohol or
neosporin.

Rhonda
November 1st 05, 05:14 PM
-L. wrote:

> Rhonda wrote:
>
>>I'm surprised they said to never use peroxide on a wound. I do when the
>>wound is new and/or dirty. I especially us it on cat bites or scratches.
>> It is an excellent cleaner. It does destroy any scabbing that's trying
>>to happen, so I just use it the first time. After that, I use an
>>antibiotic cream or alcohol.
>>
>>Rhonda
>>
>
> I think the whole "don't use peroxide" thing has been blown out of
> proportion. Peroxide is ok to use if you use it once or twice - the
> problem arises when you use it over and over time after time on the
> same wound. The problem with commercial antibiotic creams being used
> on cats is that they cause the wound to go anerobic because they are
> usually in a petrolatum base/carrier, which block air from getting to
> the wound. Cat wounds (especially bites) are notorious for becoming
> infected with anerobic bacteria. You (general you) should always use a
> topical antibiotic prescribed by a doctor like Tresaderm, which is in a
> non-petroleum base. If you don't have any available, and the wound is
> small it is acceptable to clean the wound once with peroxide to help
> stop the bleeding, and then allow it to dry. The cat will lick it to
> keep it clean. Puncture or larger-sized wounds should be seen by a vet
> because the potential for abscess is great.
>
> -L.


I actually was speaking more about cat bites and scratches on humans,
but don't think I was very clear. Sherry was talking about not using it
on any wounds in general.

I always use it on myself for cat scratches and bites, it's one of the
best ways to cleansers to get those nasty cat germs out of there! :) I
have been using antibiotic cream after that, but sounds like the cream
is not a great idea.

On cats, we sometimes use peroxide depending on where it is, then we
usually use betadine. Luckily, we haven't many cat boo boos.

Rhonda

Rhonda
November 1st 05, 05:16 PM
Diane wrote:

> In article >,
> Rhonda > wrote:
>
>>I'm surprised they said to never use peroxide on a wound.
>
> It's ineffective and potentially dangerous, and there are antibacterials
> that work better.

Peroxide is just for cleaning the wound, I apply an antibacterial afterwards.


Why do you say it is ineffective?


Rhonda

Rhonda
November 1st 05, 05:23 PM
cybercat wrote:

> According to my doctor, peroxide has come under suspicion lately
> as a carcinogen. That is why we are hearing more and more that
> we should use other things to clean wounds. That said, it is
> excellent for cleaning wounds that may be infected primarily
> *because* it destroys tissue. So if a wound is infected it
> essentially eats up the infected tissue. However, beyond a
> single application, you don't want to destroy tissue every
> time you disinfect a cut.
>
> My dentist told me never to use it as a mouthwash, for
> precisely that reason. He said, "I can tell when patients'
> are using it, even dilute, because I can see their gum
> tissue sloughing off." So, it works as a disinfectant
> but a little too well in that it kills healthy tissue. I therefore
> never use it as a mouthwash but almost always if I think
> a cut looks infective: once or twice. Then it's alcohol or
> neosporin.


I've never used it as a mouthwash, but wow, people are losing their
gums? Mental note: never use it as a mouthwash!

The way you use it is about what I do. Or if the cut is very dirty, I'll
use it too, and on anything that happened to me from a cat.

I haven't heard about the cancer part. Now that's not a comfy thought.
I'm afraid pretty soon that broccoli is going to be carcinogenic...

Rhonda

November 1st 05, 09:44 PM
cybercat wrote:
> "Rhonda" > wrote in message
> ...
> > wrote:
> >
> > > That's what the docs at the wound care clinic say. Never use peroxide
> > > on a wound, especially if it's trying to heal. It destroys new cell
> > > growth. Weirdly enough, they use honey on certain infected wounds.
> > > Honey has low-level hydrogen peroxide properties and other
> > > healing/antibacterial qualities. It's not regular honey out of a jar, I
> > > think it is specially filtered or something for pharmaceutical use, but
> > > it's still honey made by bees.
> >
> >
> > I'm surprised they said to never use peroxide on a wound. I do when the
> > wound is new and/or dirty. I especially us it on cat bites or scratches.
> > It is an excellent cleaner. It does destroy any scabbing that's trying
> > to happen, so I just use it the first time. After that, I use an
> > antibiotic cream or alcohol.
> >
>
> According to my doctor, peroxide has come under suspicion lately
> as a carcinogen. That is why we are hearing more and more that
> we should use other things to clean wounds. That said, it is
> excellent for cleaning wounds that may be infected primarily
> *because* it destroys tissue. So if a wound is infected it
> essentially eats up the infected tissue. However, beyond a
> single application, you don't want to destroy tissue every
> time you disinfect a cut.

I don't think there's a controversy about using the stuff to initially
clean the wound. Wound care clinics see a lot of diabetics who
sometimes end up losing limbs over a minor wound. What the doc was
telling me was that a number of patients will say "I've been putting
peroxide on it for two weeks and it won't heal." What they're basically
doing is destroying the new, healthy cell growth every day with
peroxide. Of course it can't heal.
All this is probably a moot discussion. I think it mostly applies to
serious wounds, not scratches.

Sherry

whitershadeofpale
November 2nd 05, 03:43 AM
I used peroxide heavily one time, on sevearl wounds that we're quite
deep; on various parts of my body.

Betadine may be better, but I never got one infection. I was cut up
pretty bad too.

I used at least one bottle per dressing each day..lots of foam.
It also seemed to work like an astringent.
it's just O2, I think it would be safe.

William Hamblen
November 2nd 05, 03:46 AM
On 2005-11-01, cybercat > wrote:

> neosporin.

Some people are allergic to neomycin and Neosporin will make them break out.
I'm one of them. Imagine a mild case of poison ivy. This definitely
interferes with the healing process.

Anything you put on a cat will get licked off unless firmly bandaged or the
cat is collared. Washing with soap and water probably is all it needs.
A cut on a paw pad is going to be walked on and licked.

--
The night is just the shadow of the Earth.

-L.
November 2nd 05, 10:50 AM
Rhonda wrote:
> I actually was speaking more about cat bites and scratches on humans,
> but don't think I was very clear. Sherry was talking about not using it
> on any wounds in general.
>
> I always use it on myself for cat scratches and bites, it's one of the
> best ways to cleansers to get those nasty cat germs out of there! :) I
> have been using antibiotic cream after that, but sounds like the cream
> is not a great idea.
>
> On cats, we sometimes use peroxide depending on where it is, then we
> usually use betadine. Luckily, we haven't many cat boo boos.
>
> Rhonda

I cleaned all cat scratches and my one bad bite with peroxide and then
with the bite, soaked it in hot salt water 3-4 times a day. Cleared it
up really quickly, removed all pain (cat bites hurt like hell) and
drew out the infection. Nasty, but it works wonders.

-L.

cybercat
November 3rd 05, 07:17 AM
"William Hamblen" > wrote in message
...
> On 2005-11-01, cybercat > wrote:
>
> > neosporin.
>
> Some people are allergic to neomycin and Neosporin will make them break
out.
> I'm one of them. Imagine a mild case of poison ivy. This definitely
> interferes with the healing process.
>

Good information, thanks, William.