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John Krystek
November 5th 05, 03:53 PM
Hi,

Our 2 year old tabby Jinx hurt himself somehow during the night and I
was hoping for some advice, specifically whether we should take him to
the vet. I figure pictures speak louder than words so I took a closeup
of the wound:

http://krystek.net/JinxCut

It's on the back of his neck, and is a cut along with about a
half-dollar sized area of missing fur. He seems irritated at not being
able to lick it, and unless I distract him he'll try to scratch at the
area. The area is very tender and he winces when it's touched. It
looks like he might have been crawling under something and had a tuft
of his fur caught then ripped out - he's an indoor-only cat. He's also
extremely jumpy and hates going to the vet so I'm hesitant to take him
there if it isn't necessary, but I'm worried about potential infection.
Is there anything I can do or should I pack him (and his brother, they
go everywhere together) up to visit the doc?

Thanks,
- John

Lumpy
November 5th 05, 04:01 PM
"John Krystek" > wrote :>
> Our 2 year old tabby Jinx hurt himself somehow during the night >
> http://krystek.net/JinxCut
>

First I have to say, what a gorgeous boy!!

As for the cut, it looks so painful. I understand that cats
have very thin skin, too. I could not rest until I had taken him to the vet
if he were mine. Remember that they mask pain very well, so he is probably
in pain even if he does not show it. Poor baby.

Victor Martinez
November 5th 05, 04:06 PM
John Krystek wrote:
> Is there anything I can do or should I pack him (and his brother, they
> go everywhere together) up to visit the doc?

We've had the exact same thing happen to one of our cats, it wasn't a
big dead. I would wash the area with disinfectant, iodide solution works
well because it doesn't hurt. Monitor for infection. In case of pus,
call vet.

Victor

ps-> he is gorgeous!

--
Victor M. Martinez
Owned and operated by the Fantastic Seven (TM)
Send your spam here:
Email me here:

DW
November 5th 05, 04:10 PM
John Krystek wrote:
> It's on the back of his neck, and is a cut along with about a
> half-dollar sized area of missing fur. He seems irritated at not being
> able to lick it, and unless I distract him he'll try to scratch at the
> area. The area is very tender and he winces when it's touched.
I can't see the injury on the picture but I would take him to a
vet/animal
hospital as a precaution. Maybe it needs stitches/cleaning/
maybe internal injuries. An xray may be needed.

Any sign of blood anywhere (throwing up, in the stool, etc.?)

philo
November 5th 05, 04:11 PM
<snip>

> It's on the back of his neck, and is a cut along with about a
> half-dollar sized area of missing fur. He seems irritated at not being
> able to lick it, and unless I distract him he'll try to scratch at the
> area. The area is very tender and he winces when it's touched. It
> looks like he might have been crawling under something and had a tuft
> of his fur caught then ripped out - he's an indoor-only cat. He's also
> extremely jumpy and hates going to the vet so I'm hesitant to take him
> there if it isn't necessary, but I'm worried about potential infection.
> Is there anything I can do or should I pack him (and his brother, they
> go everywhere together) up to visit the doc?
>

the cut looks rather minor...
just keep your eye on it...and it should get better within a few days.

if there is *any* sign that things are getting worse...
take your cat to the vet!

DW
November 5th 05, 04:13 PM
Victor Martinez wrote:
> We've had the exact same thing happen to one of our cats, it wasn't a
> big dead. I would wash the area with disinfectant, iodide solution works
> well because it doesn't hurt. Monitor for infection. In case of pus,
> call vet.
It may need stitches, the cat may also need an elizabethian collar.
Cleaning and infection is a possibility.

I would also suspect hidden internal injuries.

John Krystek
November 5th 05, 04:54 PM
Thank you to everyone that replied. I had an opportunity to look at his
injury a little more closely and it looks like the cut is fairly
superficial, more like a scrape, and probably was caused by the pulling
action of whatever he was caught on as opposed to contact trauma. I
can't imagine what could've caused this injury but I'm sure my wife and
I will turn the house over trying to figure it out.

I've decided against going to the vet at least initially because I
don't want to needlessly traumatize him. I'll be home all day and will
take him to the vet immediately if anything changes.

DW, you might need to scroll down to see the 2nd picture. Victor, you
mention washing with iodine, which I don't have on hand - what about
hydrogen peroxide? I should be able to run a stream of it over his
patch and to reduce any possibility of infection. Is there a danger of
using hydrogen peroxide on a cat?

Thanks again,
- John

If you want to see a couple great pictures of our babies around 2 years
ago:
http://www.krystek.net/JinxTeddy
Jinx has definitely grown since then. :)

MaryL
November 5th 05, 05:09 PM
"John Krystek" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Victor, you
> mention washing with iodine, which I don't have on hand - what about
> hydrogen peroxide? I should be able to run a stream of it over his
> patch and to reduce any possibility of infection. Is there a danger of
> using hydrogen peroxide on a cat?
>
> Thanks again,
> - John
>
> If you want to see a couple great pictures of our babies around 2 years
> ago:
> http://www.krystek.net/JinxTeddy
> Jinx has definitely grown since then. :)
>

John, there was recently a thread on peroxide. Look for the "peroxide and
cats" thread. Here is a quote from Megan (*very* experienced in feline
care) from that thread: "I prefer a 50/50 solution of Betadine and water,
either as a soak or topically. A few times in the past I've had to use it in
a syringe (w/no needle) to flush an abscess as well. I always blot
afterwards so it can't be ingested and have never had a problem."

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e

shortfuse
November 5th 05, 05:26 PM
Peroxide sounds good to use...I used that on my cats when they had
scrapes...
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "John Krystek" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>> Victor, you
>> mention washing with iodine, which I don't have on hand - what about
>> hydrogen peroxide? I should be able to run a stream of it over his
>> patch and to reduce any possibility of infection. Is there a danger of
>> using hydrogen peroxide on a cat?
>>
>> Thanks again,
>> - John
>>
>> If you want to see a couple great pictures of our babies around 2 years
>> ago:
>> http://www.krystek.net/JinxTeddy
>> Jinx has definitely grown since then. :)
>>
>
> John, there was recently a thread on peroxide. Look for the "peroxide and
> cats" thread. Here is a quote from Megan (*very* experienced in feline
> care) from that thread: "I prefer a 50/50 solution of Betadine and water,
> either as a soak or topically. A few times in the past I've had to use it
> in a syringe (w/no needle) to flush an abscess as well. I always blot
> afterwards so it can't be ingested and have never had a problem."
>
> MaryL
>
> Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
> Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
> Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
> Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e
>
>

5cats
November 5th 05, 05:30 PM
John Krystek wrote:

> Thank you to everyone that replied. I had an opportunity to look at his
> injury a little more closely and it looks like the cut is fairly
> superficial, more like a scrape, and probably was caused by the pulling
> action of whatever he was caught on as opposed to contact trauma. I
> can't imagine what could've caused this injury but I'm sure my wife and
> I will turn the house over trying to figure it out.
>
> I've decided against going to the vet at least initially because I
> don't want to needlessly traumatize him. I'll be home all day and will
> take him to the vet immediately if anything changes.
>
> DW, you might need to scroll down to see the 2nd picture. Victor, you
> mention washing with iodine, which I don't have on hand - what about
> hydrogen peroxide? I should be able to run a stream of it over his
> patch and to reduce any possibility of infection. Is there a danger of
> using hydrogen peroxide on a cat?
>

If you have hydrogen peroxide on hand, I'd say go ahead and use it to
clean out the wound now. Better to get the wound cleaned out now I think
instead of waiting to obtain betadine. (Years ago, a vet told me to use
hydrogen peroxide on a cat with a sore on it's neck/back, so that's what
what I've used on the few occasions I've needed to do so.)

shortfuse
November 5th 05, 05:30 PM
That "cut" looked like Rainbow when she had her allergy to fleas...I
cleansed it with Peroxide...The vet told me that was okay...and even a mild
soap with warm water would do the trick too
"shortfuse" > wrote in message
...
> Peroxide sounds good to use...I used that on my cats when they had
> scrapes...
> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>
>> "John Krystek" > wrote in message
>> oups.com...
>>> Victor, you
>>> mention washing with iodine, which I don't have on hand - what about
>>> hydrogen peroxide? I should be able to run a stream of it over his
>>> patch and to reduce any possibility of infection. Is there a danger of
>>> using hydrogen peroxide on a cat?
>>>
>>> Thanks again,
>>> - John
>>>
>>> If you want to see a couple great pictures of our babies around 2 years
>>> ago:
>>> http://www.krystek.net/JinxTeddy
>>> Jinx has definitely grown since then. :)
>>>
>>
>> John, there was recently a thread on peroxide. Look for the "peroxide
>> and cats" thread. Here is a quote from Megan (*very* experienced in
>> feline care) from that thread: "I prefer a 50/50 solution of Betadine
>> and water, either as a soak or topically. A few times in the past I've
>> had to use it in a syringe (w/no needle) to flush an abscess as well. I
>> always blot afterwards so it can't be ingested and have never had a
>> problem."
>>
>> MaryL
>>
>> Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
>> Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
>> Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
>> Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e
>>
>>
>
>

Victor Martinez
November 5th 05, 05:44 PM
DW wrote:
> It may need stitches, the cat may also need an elizabethian collar.

It's a scratch. I've never heard of stitches for scars. :) Also, she
said the cat can't lick the wound, so the collar would be unnecessary.

> Cleaning and infection is a possibility.

That's why I suggested cleaning the wound and monitoring for infection.

> I would also suspect hidden internal injuries.

From a scratch? On the back?

--
Victor M. Martinez
Owned and operated by the Fantastic Seven (TM)
Send your spam here:
Email me here:

Victor Martinez
November 5th 05, 05:45 PM
John Krystek wrote:
> action of whatever he was caught on as opposed to contact trauma. I
> can't imagine what could've caused this injury but I'm sure my wife and
> I will turn the house over trying to figure it out.

It was probably your cat running full speed under a chair or table or
other furniture and miscalculating his height. :)

> DW, you might need to scroll down to see the 2nd picture. Victor, you
> mention washing with iodine, which I don't have on hand - what about
> hydrogen peroxide? I should be able to run a stream of it over his
> patch and to reduce any possibility of infection. Is there a danger of
> using hydrogen peroxide on a cat?

Nope, I've used it as well. Just make sure it doesn't get anywhere near
his face.

--
Victor M. Martinez
Owned and operated by the Fantastic Seven (TM)
Send your spam here:
Email me here:

MaryL
November 5th 05, 05:46 PM
"shortfuse" > wrote in message
...
> That "cut" looked like Rainbow when she had her allergy to fleas...I
> cleansed it with Peroxide...The vet told me that was okay...and even a
> mild soap with warm water would do the trick too
>

Some of that was discussed on the thread I mentioned ("peroxide and cats").
I used to use hydrogen peroxide on my own cuts. It was painless and would
"bubble out" any dirt. Then my doctor told me that is not a good idea
because peroxide can slow down the healing process. If it is used, it
should be used only *once* and not as a continuing procedure.

MaryL

Victor Martinez
November 5th 05, 06:51 PM
MaryL wrote:
> because peroxide can slow down the healing process. If it is used, it
> should be used only *once* and not as a continuing procedure.

Right. Peroxide should be used for initial cleaning only, and only if
betadine is not available, IMO.

--
Victor M. Martinez
Owned and operated by the Fantastic Seven (TM)
Send your spam here:
Email me here:

Rhonda
November 5th 05, 06:59 PM
Sorry your kitty had an accident.

For minor cuts, we use peroxide once to clean it out (but only once --
it prevents scabs from forming,) then betadine or iodine if it looks
like it could become infected.

Hope he's better soon. Wish they could talk about their adventures...

Rhonda

John Krystek wrote:

>
> I've decided against going to the vet at least initially because I
> don't want to needlessly traumatize him. I'll be home all day and will
> take him to the vet immediately if anything changes.
>
> DW, you might need to scroll down to see the 2nd picture. Victor, you
> mention washing with iodine, which I don't have on hand - what about
> hydrogen peroxide? I should be able to run a stream of it over his
> patch and to reduce any possibility of infection. Is there a danger of
> using hydrogen peroxide on a cat?

Karen
November 5th 05, 08:17 PM
On 2005-11-05 11:59:41 -0600, Rhonda > said:

> Sorry your kitty had an accident.
>
> For minor cuts, we use peroxide once to clean it out (but only once --
> it prevents scabs from forming,) then betadine or iodine if it looks
> like it could become infected.
>
> Hope he's better soon. Wish they could talk about their adventures...
>
> Rhonda
>
> John Krystek wrote:
>
>>
>> I've decided against going to the vet at least initially because I
>> don't want to needlessly traumatize him. I'll be home all day and will
>> take him to the vet immediately if anything changes.
>>
>> DW, you might need to scroll down to see the 2nd picture. Victor, you
>> mention washing with iodine, which I don't have on hand - what about
>> hydrogen peroxide? I should be able to run a stream of it over his
>> patch and to reduce any possibility of infection. Is there a danger of
>> using hydrogen peroxide on a cat?

What about that good soap that is quite gentle that doctors use. Used
to come in a green bottle at Walgreens. That looks like a scrape of
some kind to me. Good thing he can't reach it. Make sure his brother
doesn't over aggravate it if they clean each other much.

cybercat
November 5th 05, 08:42 PM
"Victor Martinez" > wrote in message
...
> DW wrote:
> > It may need stitches, the cat may also need an elizabethian collar.
>
> It's a scratch. I've never heard of stitches for scars. :) Also, she
> said the cat can't lick the wound, so the collar would be unnecessary.
>
> > Cleaning and infection is a possibility.
>
> That's why I suggested cleaning the wound and monitoring for infection.
>
> > I would also suspect hidden internal injuries.
>
> From a scratch? On the back?
>

All speculation aside, there is no way you can tell what actually
happened to this cat just from that mark on his neck. I understand
the OP's decision but I would still take him to the vet if he were mine.

carola
November 5th 05, 08:58 PM
"cybercat" > schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
:
: "Victor Martinez" > wrote in message
: ...
: > DW wrote:
: > > It may need stitches, the cat may also need an elizabethian collar.
: >
: > It's a scratch. I've never heard of stitches for scars. :) Also, she
: > said the cat can't lick the wound, so the collar would be unnecessary.
: >
: > > Cleaning and infection is a possibility.
: >
: > That's why I suggested cleaning the wound and monitoring for infection.
: >
: > > I would also suspect hidden internal injuries.
: >
: > From a scratch? On the back?
: >
:
: All speculation aside, there is no way you can tell what actually
: happened to this cat just from that mark on his neck. I understand
: the OP's decision but I would still take him to the vet if he were mine.


Could the cats have had a fight? Could the collar have got caught and caused
this?
It looks like a superficial wound to me, disinfectant and a bit of healing
cream should do.
I love vets, but that doesn't say that we must consult them for minor
things.

carola

223rem
November 5th 05, 09:13 PM
DW wrote:

> It may need stitches, the cat may also need an elizabethian collar.
> Cleaning and infection is a possibility.
>
> I would also suspect hidden internal injuries.

Utterly ridiculous.

DW
November 5th 05, 10:05 PM
Victor Martinez wrote:
> It's a scratch. I've never heard of stitches for scars. :) Also, she
> said the cat can't lick the wound, so the collar would be unnecessary.
I don't know about your monitor but on mine I can't tell how deep the
cut is
or how long it is. A deep cut may require stitchs.

> That's why I suggested cleaning the wound and monitoring for infection.
And without an Elizabethan collar you may not be able to keep it clean
and
keep the cat from licking it/knawing at it.

> From a scratch? On the back?
I'm glad your monitor is such that can tell it is minor.

I would add even if the cut itself is minor the injury may have caused
other wounds,
wounds that are internal and not as obvious.

Oh I forgot......your monitor also has xray vision.

DW
November 5th 05, 10:15 PM
Diane wrote:
> Scroll down -- it's the second photo.
I didn't scroll down to the second photo the first time.

I would still see a vet to rule out internal injuries and also
to question why so much fur is mssing? It would seem to
me more fur missing than would be warranted by one
scrap. Again that would lead me to suspect internal
injury.

Ramboyd
November 5th 05, 10:26 PM
DW wrote:

> Victor Martinez wrote:
> > It's a scratch. I've never heard of stitches for scars. :) Also, she
> > said the cat can't lick the wound, so the collar would be unnecessary.
> I don't know about your monitor but on mine I can't tell how deep the
> cut is
> or how long it is. A deep cut may require stitchs.
>
> > That's why I suggested cleaning the wound and monitoring for infection.
> And without an Elizabethan collar you may not be able to keep it clean
> and
> keep the cat from licking it/knawing at it.
>
> > From a scratch? On the back?
> I'm glad your monitor is such that can tell it is minor.
>
> I would add even if the cut itself is minor the injury may have caused
> other wounds,
> wounds that are internal and not as obvious.
>
> Oh I forgot......your monitor also has xray vision.

Your way too paranoid. Give natural immunity a chance. I once wiped out on
my bike while driving shirtless. Slid diagonally across the street on my
back and into the curb. Skin was scrapped on half my back, shoulder and
side. I took a shower. End of story.

Ramboyd

======

"My Ottawa Includes Corruption"

Joe Canuck
November 5th 05, 10:26 PM
Lumpy wrote:

> "John Krystek" > wrote :>
>
>>Our 2 year old tabby Jinx hurt himself somehow during the night >
>>http://krystek.net/JinxCut
>>
>
>
> First I have to say, what a gorgeous boy!!
>
> As for the cut, it looks so painful. I understand that cats
> have very thin skin, too. I could not rest until I had taken him to the vet
> if he were mine. Remember that they mask pain very well, so he is probably
> in pain even if he does not show it. Poor baby.
>
>

Off to the vet... immediately!!!

Lumpy
November 5th 05, 10:42 PM
"Joe Canuck" > wrote in message
...
> Lumpy wrote:
>
> > "John Krystek" > wrote :>
> >
> >>Our 2 year old tabby Jinx hurt himself somehow during the night >
> >>http://krystek.net/JinxCut
> >>
> >
> >
> > First I have to say, what a gorgeous boy!!
> >
> > As for the cut, it looks so painful. I understand that cats
> > have very thin skin, too. I could not rest until I had taken him to the
vet
> > if he were mine. Remember that they mask pain very well, so he is
probably
> > in pain even if he does not show it. Poor baby.
> >
> >
>
> Off to the vet... immediately!!!
>

I mean, Jesus, why NOT, you know? No cat likes to go to the vet,
but better to dispel all questions especially with creatures as stoic as
cats.

Victor Martinez
November 5th 05, 11:44 PM
DW wrote:
> Victor Martinez wrote:
> I don't know about your monitor but on mine I can't tell how deep the
> cut is or how long it is. A deep cut may require stitchs.

It's not a cut, it's a scratch. You can tell by the pattern of missing fur.

> And without an Elizabethan collar you may not be able to keep it clean
> and keep the cat from licking it/knawing at it.

Did you read the part where the OP says the cat *can't* lick the wound?

--
Victor M. Martinez
Owned and operated by the Fantastic Seven (TM)
Send your spam here:
Email me here:

Victor Martinez
November 5th 05, 11:47 PM
DW wrote:
> Oh I forgot......your monitor also has xray vision.

No, but I have common sense. Something you seem to lack.

--
Victor M. Martinez
Owned and operated by the Fantastic Seven (TM)
Send your spam here:
Email me here:

Joe Canuck
November 5th 05, 11:56 PM
Victor Martinez wrote:

> DW wrote:
>
>> Victor Martinez wrote:
>> I don't know about your monitor but on mine I can't tell how deep the
>> cut is or how long it is. A deep cut may require stitchs.
>
>
> It's not a cut, it's a scratch. You can tell by the pattern of missing fur.
>
>> And without an Elizabethan collar you may not be able to keep it clean
>> and keep the cat from licking it/knawing at it.
>
>
> Did you read the part where the OP says the cat *can't* lick the wound?
>

The collar has strange healing powers. :-D

Joe Canuck
November 5th 05, 11:59 PM
DW wrote:

> Diane wrote:
>
>>Scroll down -- it's the second photo.
>
> I didn't scroll down to the second photo the first time.
>
> I would still see a vet to rule out internal injuries and also
> to question why so much fur is mssing? It would seem to
> me more fur missing than would be warranted by one
> scrap. Again that would lead me to suspect internal
> injury.
>

Uhmmm, I think you may have an internal injury... better go to the
emergency department pronto!

Monique
November 6th 05, 12:16 AM
"carola" <
> I love vets, but that doesn't say that we must consult them for minor
> things.
>

For something like this, I wouldn't bother. Unless it turned red and nasty,
with the cat getting listless.

cybercat
November 6th 05, 12:26 AM
"Monique" > wrote in message
...
>
> "carola" <
> > I love vets, but that doesn't say that we must consult them for minor
> > things.
> >
>
> For something like this, I wouldn't bother. Unless it turned red and
nasty,
> with the cat getting listless.
>

Wow. We really are different about our cats. I would never want it to
get to this point. I owe my cats more than this. Vet first. Better safe than
sorry. The only reason NOT to see a vet is to save the money or "the cat
stress." I'll always err on the side of taking the best care of my animals.

cybercat
November 6th 05, 12:27 AM
"carola" > wrote in message
...
>
> "cybercat" > schrieb im Newsbeitrag
> ...
> :
> : "Victor Martinez" > wrote in message
> : ...
> : > DW wrote:
> : > > It may need stitches, the cat may also need an elizabethian collar.
> : >
> : > It's a scratch. I've never heard of stitches for scars. :) Also, she
> : > said the cat can't lick the wound, so the collar would be unnecessary.
> : >
> : > > Cleaning and infection is a possibility.
> : >
> : > That's why I suggested cleaning the wound and monitoring for
infection.
> : >
> : > > I would also suspect hidden internal injuries.
> : >
> : > From a scratch? On the back?
> : >
> :
> : All speculation aside, there is no way you can tell what actually
> : happened to this cat just from that mark on his neck. I understand
> : the OP's decision but I would still take him to the vet if he were mine.
>
>
> Could the cats have had a fight? Could the collar have got caught and
caused
> this?
> It looks like a superficial wound to me, disinfectant and a bit of healing
> cream should do.
> I love vets, but that doesn't say that we must consult them for minor
> things.
>

I don't "love vets." I love my cats, and I'm responsible for them.

MaryL
November 6th 05, 01:15 AM
"Monique" > wrote in message
...
>
> "carola" <
>> I love vets, but that doesn't say that we must consult them for minor
>> things.
>>
>
> For something like this, I wouldn't bother. Unless it turned red and
> nasty, with the cat getting listless.
>

I would never wait. I have often taken my cats to the vet for very minor
problems, but I would much rather get medical attention when it is not
necessary than neglect something and have it turn into something serious.

MaryL

rpl
November 6th 05, 01:34 AM
John Krystek wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Our 2 year old tabby Jinx hurt himself somehow during the night and I
> was hoping for some advice, specifically whether we should take him to
> the vet. I figure pictures speak louder than words so I took a closeup
> of the wound:
>
> http://krystek.net/JinxCut
>
> It's on the back of his neck, and is a cut along with about a
> half-dollar sized area of missing fur. He seems irritated at not being
> able to lick it, and unless I distract him he'll try to scratch at the
> area. The area is very tender and he winces when it's touched. It
> looks like he might have been crawling under something and had a tuft
> of his fur caught then ripped out - he's an indoor-only cat. He's also
> extremely jumpy and hates going to the vet so I'm hesitant to take him
> there if it isn't necessary, but I'm worried about potential infection.
> Is there anything I can do or should I pack him (and his brother, they
> go everywhere together) up to visit the doc?

Well, if they haven't been in awhile, why not?

But it doesn't look too serious; you say it appeared all-at-once, then
that's probably what it was: cat got caught on something (maybe bro's
teeth)... I'd wash the area once or twice a day with a mild disinfectant
and keep a close eye on the skin lesions... if he was indoors at the
time, maybe look around for tufts of fur.


Pat

Joe Canuck
November 6th 05, 01:50 AM
rpl wrote:

> John Krystek wrote:
>
>> Hi,
>>
>> Our 2 year old tabby Jinx hurt himself somehow during the night and I
>> was hoping for some advice, specifically whether we should take him to
>> the vet. I figure pictures speak louder than words so I took a closeup
>> of the wound:
>>
>> http://krystek.net/JinxCut
>>
>> It's on the back of his neck, and is a cut along with about a
>> half-dollar sized area of missing fur. He seems irritated at not being
>> able to lick it, and unless I distract him he'll try to scratch at the
>> area. The area is very tender and he winces when it's touched. It
>> looks like he might have been crawling under something and had a tuft
>> of his fur caught then ripped out - he's an indoor-only cat. He's also
>> extremely jumpy and hates going to the vet so I'm hesitant to take him
>> there if it isn't necessary, but I'm worried about potential infection.
>> Is there anything I can do or should I pack him (and his brother, they
>> go everywhere together) up to visit the doc?
>
>
> Well, if they haven't been in awhile, why not?
>
> But it doesn't look too serious; you say it appeared all-at-once, then
> that's probably what it was: cat got caught on something (maybe bro's
> teeth)... I'd wash the area once or twice a day with a mild disinfectant
> and keep a close eye on the skin lesions... if he was indoors at the
> time, maybe look around for tufts of fur.
>
>
> Pat

Uhmmm, you missed the part where the OP said "he's an indoor-only
cat"... emphasis on *indoor*

rpl
November 6th 05, 02:16 AM
John Krystek wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Our 2 year old tabby Jinx hurt himself somehow during the night and I
> was hoping for some advice, specifically whether we should take him to
> the vet. I figure pictures speak louder than words so I took a closeup
> of the wound:
>
> http://krystek.net/JinxCut
>
> It's on the back of his neck, and is a cut along with about a
> half-dollar sized area of missing fur. He seems irritated at not being
> able to lick it, and unless I distract him he'll try to scratch at the
> area. The area is very tender and he winces when it's touched. It
> looks like he might have been crawling under something and had a tuft
> of his fur caught then ripped out - he's an indoor-only cat. He's also
> extremely jumpy and hates going to the vet so I'm hesitant to take him
> there if it isn't necessary, but I'm worried about potential infection.
> Is there anything I can do or should I pack him (and his brother, they
> go everywhere together) up to visit the doc?

The bald spot is a result of a minor infection... the hair has fallen
out (or is easier to remove)... clean with a mild disinfectant once then
wash it occasionally with warm water; keep an eye on it, doesn't look
too serious at this point.

.... I wonder if that plastic spray bandage would help?

Pat

223rem
November 6th 05, 02:53 AM
John Krystek wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Our 2 year old tabby Jinx hurt himself somehow during the night and I
> was hoping for some advice, specifically whether we should take him to
> the vet. I figure pictures speak louder than words so I took a closeup
> of the wound:
>
> http://krystek.net/JinxCut

Looks like he's cut himself shaving.

-L.
November 6th 05, 03:36 AM
John Krystek wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Our 2 year old tabby Jinx hurt himself somehow during the night and I
> was hoping for some advice, specifically whether we should take him to
> the vet. I figure pictures speak louder than words so I took a closeup
> of the wound:
>
> http://krystek.net/JinxCut

That's a classic picture of a cat that got his collar cought on
something and tried to back out of it. You are really lucky he didn't
strangle himself.

Ditch the collar asap, and don't put another on him. Clean the wound
with hydrogen peroxide and then leave it alone - it will heal. Keep an
eye on it for infection.

-L.

Joe Canuck
November 6th 05, 03:44 AM
-L. wrote:

> John Krystek wrote:
>
>>Hi,
>>
>>Our 2 year old tabby Jinx hurt himself somehow during the night and I
>>was hoping for some advice, specifically whether we should take him to
>>the vet. I figure pictures speak louder than words so I took a closeup
>>of the wound:
>>
>>http://krystek.net/JinxCut
>
>
> That's a classic picture of a cat that got his collar cought on
> something and tried to back out of it. You are really lucky he didn't
> strangle himself.
>
> Ditch the collar asap, and don't put another on him. Clean the wound
> with hydrogen peroxide and then leave it alone - it will heal. Keep an
> eye on it for infection.
>
> -L.
>

Cover the wound with mud, that is what wild animals do.

Disclaimer: Don't try this at home kids.

rrb
November 6th 05, 04:50 AM
John Krystek wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Our 2 year old tabby Jinx hurt himself somehow during the night and I
> was hoping for some advice, specifically whether we should take him to
> the vet. I figure pictures speak louder than words so I took a closeup
> of the wound:
>
> http://krystek.net/JinxCut
>
> It's on the back of his neck, and is a cut along with about a
> half-dollar sized area of missing fur. He seems irritated at not being
> able to lick it, and unless I distract him he'll try to scratch at the
> area. The area is very tender and he winces when it's touched. It
> looks like he might have been crawling under something and had a tuft
> of his fur caught then ripped out - he's an indoor-only cat. He's also
> extremely jumpy and hates going to the vet so I'm hesitant to take him
> there if it isn't necessary, but I'm worried about potential infection.
> Is there anything I can do or should I pack him (and his brother, they
> go everywhere together) up to visit the doc?
>
> Thanks,
> - John
>

I would cleanse it as others have said and keep an eye on it. Keeping a
little antibiotic cream or ointment can't hurt as well. Since he is a
long haired cat I would look around or feel the skin around it for any
other injuries that could be hidden by the fur.

-L.
November 6th 05, 10:22 AM
rpl wrote:
> The bald spot is a result of a minor infection... the hair has fallen
> out (or is easier to remove)

That's what I thought initially (at first look) but hair loss from
infection generally occurs equidistant on all sides of the wound, and
the wound itself (in this photo) does not look infected. The hair has
been pulled out in a pattern, if you look closely - and the scrape at
the end of the missing hair is more a gouge - from his collar. Then it
dawned on me: It's a classic pic of a collar injury.

>... clean with a mild disinfectant once then
> wash it occasionally with warm water; keep an eye on it, doesn't look
> too serious at this point.
>
> ... I wonder if that plastic spray bandage would help?

Don't ever use these on cat wounds. Cats are notorious fior developing
infections from anerobic bacteria, and those spray bandages and
sealants do not allow air to get to the wound. Furthermore, some can
cause crystaline granulomas as the tissue reacts to the glues and
causes the particles to become incased. Also, do not use antibiotic
ointments on cats for the same reason - the wounds need air to heal
properly. Any topical cream or antibiotic ointment to be used on
wounds on animals should be obtained from a vet.

Generally, minor scrapes such as these (no profuse bleeding) can be
treated at home with antiseptic and close monitoring. There is a
Band-aid brand "no-sting" antiseptic on the market which contains
benzalykonium chloride (IIRC):

http://www.bandaid.com/cleansing_products.shtml (the one on the right
of the site)

This can be used safely on almost any minor wound: human, dog, cat,
reptile. Rinse the wound well with the product, pat it dry with
sterile gauze and LEAVE IT ALONE. Check it every 8-12 hours or so for
heat (around the wound) or redness which can be signs of infection. If
it doesn't look improved in 2-3 days, get your animal to a vet. If the
wound seems infected, take the animal to a vet.

Puncture wounds or gaping wounds (those which bleed profusely and do
not stop bleeding after 5-10 minutes of constant pressure on the wound
with sterile gauze) need to be treated by a vet. Animal bites always
need to be treated by a vet. Infections of any kind need to be
treated by a vet. Minor cuts and abrasions generally can be treated at
home, but if in doubt, take your animal to a vet. Infection and
abscess can occur fairly rapidly. Abscess is serious.

-L.

John Krystek
November 7th 05, 04:22 PM
Thanks again for all well-intentioned replies, everyone's opinions are
very much appreciated.

I've updated the pictures with a shot of his wound last night (Sunday
evening) - we've decided to take him to the vet today after work since
his scratching is irritating the area and causing more hair loss. In
the meantime we've put softpaws (soft rubber protective claw covers) on
his rear nails as a preventative measure.

Thanks again, and I'll update this story when I know more.

- John

cybercat
November 7th 05, 06:01 PM
"John Krystek" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> I've updated the pictures with a shot of his wound last night (Sunday
> evening) - we've decided to take him to the vet today after work since
> his scratching is irritating the area and causing more hair loss. In
> the meantime we've put softpaws (soft rubber protective claw covers) on
> his rear nails as a preventative measure.

Very smart. Always better safe than sorry. Your boy is clearly in good
hands.

>
> Thanks again, and I'll update this story when I know more.
>

I will look forward to the update. I am really curious about what did this
to him, as I also have indoor-only cats and wonder what seemingly harmless
object may enable them to hurt themselves in this way.

Ratatooie
November 7th 05, 11:53 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "John Krystek" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>>
>> I've updated the pictures with a shot of his wound last night (Sunday
>> evening) - we've decided to take him to the vet today after work since
>> his scratching is irritating the area and causing more hair loss. In
>> the meantime we've put softpaws (soft rubber protective claw covers) on
>> his rear nails as a preventative measure.
>
> Very smart. Always better safe than sorry. Your boy is clearly in good
> hands.
>
>>
>> Thanks again, and I'll update this story when I know more.
>>
>
> I will look forward to the update. I am really curious about what did this
> to him, as I also have indoor-only cats and wonder what seemingly harmless
> object may enable them to hurt themselves in this way.

Well, as a long time cat owner...

That looks like a close encounter with a rubber belt, as in the type used to
drive a blower fan on furnace or air conditioner. Have you looked through
your house with a critical eye about what could have caused it? Remember
cats can get under beds, furniture and through remarkably small spaces.

The second picture looks infected, I would use topcial cream such as
"Neosporin" on it and make a vet appointment.

Not to be paranoid, but who else lives with the cat? You can read a lot
from a cat's expression / comfort level... try picking it up for a cuddle
then walking around and "pointing" the cat at people and places (fridge,
doors, basement appliances, etc.) to see if there is a reaction. It might
"tell" you where it remembers getting hurt.

Victor Martinez
November 8th 05, 12:21 AM
John Krystek wrote:
> I've updated the pictures with a shot of his wound last night (Sunday
> evening) - we've decided to take him to the vet today after work since
> his scratching is irritating the area and causing more hair loss. In

Yeah, the second picture definitely looks worse.

> Thanks again, and I'll update this story when I know more.

Please do.

--
Victor M. Martinez
Owned and operated by the Fantastic Seven (TM)
Send your spam here:
Email me here:

MarAzul
November 8th 05, 06:31 AM
"John Krystek" > wrote in message
oups.com...

> DW, you might need to scroll down to see the 2nd picture. Victor, you
> mention washing with iodine, which I don't have on hand - what about
> hydrogen peroxide? I should be able to run a stream of it over his
> patch and to reduce any possibility of infection. Is there a danger of
> using hydrogen peroxide on a cat?
>

Don't use peroxide on the wound. As Mary said, it will actually slow down
the healing process. While it's true that peroxide does kill germs, it also
kills healing cells in the process. If you don't have betadine or iodine
available, some gentle soap and water will do just as well.

--
Mar
---------
VTIT

John Krystek
November 9th 05, 05:12 AM
A quick update:

We took Jinx to our cat clinic yesterday where the vet cleaned the
wound (gauze and hydrogen peroxide) and prescribed antibiotics. Today
the cut isn't looking too great - it's fairly infected and starting to
get pussy, so we just cleaned it thoroughly with some warm soapy water.
I hope it gets better soon as DW is starting to freak out at its
gruesome appearance and it's only a matter of time before we run back
to the vet.

Latest picture shows the progression: http://www.krystek.net/JinxCut

Updates will follow as he hopefully improves.

- John

cybercat
November 9th 05, 05:19 AM
"John Krystek" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> A quick update:
>
> We took Jinx to our cat clinic yesterday where the vet cleaned the
> wound (gauze and hydrogen peroxide) and prescribed antibiotics. Today
> the cut isn't looking too great - it's fairly infected and starting to
> get pussy, so we just cleaned it thoroughly with some warm soapy water.
> I hope it gets better soon as DW is starting to freak out at its
> gruesome appearance and it's only a matter of time before we run back
> to the vet.
>
> Latest picture shows the progression: http://www.krystek.net/JinxCut
>
> Updates will follow as he hopefully improves.
>

John, I appreciate your honesty in giving us these updates. Perhaps
the many others who seemed to think it was fine to leave the cut
untreated by a vet will get the point that it is always better to be safe
than sorry.

That said, I really don't see how this could be any sort of wound from
Jinx's collar. I hope he heals soon and that the vet can help you speed
the process along. Poor baby.

November 9th 05, 05:42 AM
"cybercat" > wrote:

>
>"John Krystek" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>> A quick update:
>>
>> We took Jinx to our cat clinic yesterday where the vet cleaned the
>> wound (gauze and hydrogen peroxide) and prescribed antibiotics. Today
>> the cut isn't looking too great - it's fairly infected and starting to
>> get pussy, so we just cleaned it thoroughly with some warm soapy water.
>> I hope it gets better soon as DW is starting to freak out at its
>> gruesome appearance and it's only a matter of time before we run back
>> to the vet.
>>
>> Latest picture shows the progression: http://www.krystek.net/JinxCut
>>
>> Updates will follow as he hopefully improves.
>>
>
>John, I appreciate your honesty in giving us these updates. Perhaps
>the many others who seemed to think it was fine to leave the cut
>untreated by a vet will get the point that it is always better to be safe
>than sorry.

Amen!
-mhd

-L.
November 9th 05, 11:45 AM
John Krystek wrote:
> A quick update:
>
> We took Jinx to our cat clinic yesterday where the vet cleaned the
> wound (gauze and hydrogen peroxide) and prescribed antibiotics. Today
> the cut isn't looking too great - it's fairly infected and starting to
> get pussy, so we just cleaned it thoroughly with some warm soapy water.
> I hope it gets better soon as DW is starting to freak out at its
> gruesome appearance and it's only a matter of time before we run back
> to the vet.
>
> Latest picture shows the progression: http://www.krystek.net/JinxCut
>
> Updates will follow as he hopefully improves.
>
> - John

It's infected - you have to keep him from scratching it which is what
caused it to get worse in the first place. if it doesn't improve after
36-48 hours on antibiotics, call the vet - the antibiotic may not be
the right one for the infection.

-L.

-L.
November 9th 05, 11:50 AM
cybercat wrote:
> John, I appreciate your honesty in giving us these updates. Perhaps
> the many others who seemed to think it was fine to leave the cut
> untreated by a vet will get the point that it is always better to be safe
> than sorry.

The wound got worse because the cat obviously scratched it. Prior to
that, it appeared to be a minor scrape per the OP's *own description*.

>
> That said, I really don't see how this could be any sort of wound from
> Jinx's collar.

*This* wound isn't - it is now a wound from being scratched by the cat.
Idiot.

But go ahead and cart your cat to the vet every time it farts wrong or
its hair looks fluffier than usual - vets love people like you.

-L.

whitershadeofpale
November 9th 05, 01:03 PM
-L. wrote:

> But go ahead and cart your cat to the vet every time it farts wrong or
> its hair looks fluffier than usual - vets love people like you.
>
> -L.

-L. !

what are saying dear

cart your cat? lol

-L.
November 9th 05, 01:10 PM
whitershadeofpale wrote:

> -L. !
>
> what are saying dear
>
> cart your cat? lol

It's a transitive verb that means to "move laboriously".
Or something like that.
-L.

Victor Martinez
November 9th 05, 01:21 PM
cybercat wrote:
> John, I appreciate your honesty in giving us these updates. Perhaps
> the many others who seemed to think it was fine to leave the cut
> untreated by a vet will get the point that it is always better to be safe
> than sorry.

Wrong. If he had taken the cat into the vet when he originally posted
(when the wound was *not* infected), the vet would have done *exactly*
as John did. Unless it was a pill-happy vet, he would not have
prescribed antibiotics without an infection. So, the trip at that time
would have been useless and he would have had to return once the
infection set it. What he did was right, cleaned the wound, and monitor
it. It got infected, and off to the vet he went. If it had not gotten
infected, he would have saved one trip to the vet.


--
Victor M. Martinez
Owned and operated by the Fantastic Seven (TM)
Send your spam here:
Email me here:

cybercat
November 9th 05, 04:43 PM
"-L." > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> cybercat wrote:
> > John, I appreciate your honesty in giving us these updates. Perhaps
> > the many others who seemed to think it was fine to leave the cut
> > untreated by a vet will get the point that it is always better to be
safe
> > than sorry.
>
> The wound got worse because the cat obviously scratched it. Prior to
> that, it appeared to be a minor scrape per the OP's *own description*.
>
> >
> > That said, I really don't see how this could be any sort of wound from
> > Jinx's collar.
>
> *This* wound isn't - it is now a wound from being scratched by the cat.
> Idiot.
>
> But go ahead and cart your cat to the vet every time it farts wrong or
> its hair looks fluffier than usual - vets love people like you.
>

The fact remains that had the cat been under a vet's care, the cut
would not have become infected. You only look like a bigger ass
when you argue against better care for injured cats. But hey, everyone
has to have a hobby.

cybercat
November 9th 05, 04:53 PM
"Victor Martinez" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
> > John, I appreciate your honesty in giving us these updates. Perhaps
> > the many others who seemed to think it was fine to leave the cut
> > untreated by a vet will get the point that it is always better to be
safe
> > than sorry.
>
> Wrong. If he had taken the cat into the vet when he originally posted
> (when the wound was *not* infected), the vet would have done *exactly*
> as John did.

You don't know that. he might have put a collar on the cat to keep
him from getting it infected.

>Unless it was a pill-happy vet, he would not have
> prescribed antibiotics without an infection. So, the trip at that time
> would have been useless and he would have had to return once the
> infection set it. What he did was right, cleaned the wound, and monitor
> it. It got infected, and off to the vet he went. If it had not gotten
> infected, he would have saved one trip to the vet.
>

It does nobody any good to argue for less effective care for
injured cats, Victor. The best thing to do for any injury is to
take the cat to the vet first. The only reason not to is because
you don't want to spend the money. When it comes to creatures
we love who are dependent on us, it is always better safe than
sorry.

whayface
November 9th 05, 06:04 PM
On Wed, 9 Nov 2005 10:53:27 -0500, "cybercat" > wrote:

>>Unless it was a pill-happy vet, he would not have
>> prescribed antibiotics without an infection. So, the trip at that time
>> would have been useless and he would have had to return once the
>> infection set it. What he did was right, cleaned the wound, and monitor
>> it. It got infected, and off to the vet he went. If it had not gotten
>> infected, he would have saved one trip to the vet.
>>
>
>It does nobody any good to argue for less effective care for
>injured cats, Victor. The best thing to do for any injury is to
>take the cat to the vet first. The only reason not to is because
>you don't want to spend the money. When it comes to creatures
>we love who are dependent on us, it is always better safe than
>sorry.
>

If you do not want to spend money for proper care for your pet you should find someone to
take it that will care for it properly!!!

carola
November 9th 05, 06:13 PM
: >John, I appreciate your honesty in giving us these updates. Perhaps
: >the many others who seemed to think it was fine to leave the cut
: >untreated by a vet will get the point that it is always better to be safe
: >than sorry.
:
: Amen!
: -mhd



Have you got an idea what might have happened yet?

carola

carola
November 9th 05, 06:15 PM
"-L." > schrieb im Newsbeitrag
oups.com...
:
: cybercat wrote:
: > John, I appreciate your honesty in giving us these updates. Perhaps
: > the many others who seemed to think it was fine to leave the cut
: > untreated by a vet will get the point that it is always better to be
safe
: > than sorry.
:
: The wound got worse because the cat obviously scratched it. Prior to
: that, it appeared to be a minor scrape per the OP's *own description*.
:
: >
: > That said, I really don't see how this could be any sort of wound from
: > Jinx's collar.
:
: *This* wound isn't - it is now a wound from being scratched by the cat.
: Idiot.
:
: But go ahead and cart your cat to the vet every time it farts wrong or
: its hair looks fluffier than usual - vets love people like you.
:
: -L.



Right, calm down - we're all learning, aren't we?
How would *you* have prevented the cat from scratching the wound?

carola

carola
November 9th 05, 06:16 PM
"whitershadeofpale" > schrieb im Newsbeitrag
ups.com...
:
: -L. wrote:
:
: > But go ahead and cart your cat to the vet every time it farts wrong or
: > its hair looks fluffier than usual - vets love people like you.
: >
: > -L.
:
: -L. !
:
: what are saying dear
:
: cart your cat? lol


It means the poster has got pony and cart ...

-L.
November 9th 05, 06:49 PM
cybercat wrote:
>
> The fact remains that had the cat been under a vet's care, the cut
> would not have become infected.

LOL...the vet would have done exactly what Victor said and the OP did -
treat it topically and kept an eye on it. That was a minor wound.
They don't give antibiotics for minor wounds. An E-collar wouldn't
work for this wound - it is too far back. E-collars are to keep the
cat from scratching its HEAD.

> You only look like a bigger ass
> when you argue against better care for injured cats.

You're the one who is an ass- running to the vet for every little cut
an scrape. But like I said - go ahead waste your money. Vets love
people like you; you simply have no common sense.

>But hey, everyone
> has to have a hobby.

Yeah, and yours is stalking me. As everybody now knows. Crybaby.

-L.

-L.
November 9th 05, 06:56 PM
Victor Martinez wrote:
>
> Wrong. If he had taken the cat into the vet when he originally posted
> (when the wound was *not* infected), the vet would have done *exactly*
> as John did. Unless it was a pill-happy vet, he would not have
> prescribed antibiotics without an infection.

Change those last words to "without an infection or suspected
infection" and I agree. Sometimes infection cannot be confirmed, but
the cat is treated with antibiotics when other modalities don't work.
Also, some infective agents cannot be grown in vitro.

> So, the trip at that time
> would have been useless and he would have had to return once the
> infection set it. What he did was right, cleaned the wound, and monitor
> it. It got infected, and off to the vet he went. If it had not gotten
> infected, he would have saved one trip to the vet.
>

Some peiople just don;t have any common sense. People who cart their
cat off to the vet everytime it farts wrong become a joke in the vet
offices. It wastes everybody's time but makes the insecure feel better
about themselves.

-L.

cybercat
November 9th 05, 07:04 PM
"-L." > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Victor Martinez wrote:
> >
> > Wrong. If he had taken the cat into the vet when he originally posted
> > (when the wound was *not* infected), the vet would have done *exactly*
> > as John did. Unless it was a pill-happy vet, he would not have
> > prescribed antibiotics without an infection.
>
> Change those last words to "without an infection or suspected
> infection" and I agree. Sometimes infection cannot be confirmed, but
> the cat is treated with antibiotics when other modalities don't work.
> Also, some infective agents cannot be grown in vitro.
>
> > So, the trip at that time
> > would have been useless and he would have had to return once the
> > infection set it. What he did was right, cleaned the wound, and monitor
> > it. It got infected, and off to the vet he went. If it had not gotten
> > infected, he would have saved one trip to the vet.
> >
>
> Some peiople just don;t have any common sense. People who cart their
> cat off to the vet everytime it farts wrong become a joke in the vet
> offices. It wastes everybody's time but makes the insecure feel better
> about themselves.
>

No matter how you spin it you are arguing for less effective
health care for cats. All the ad hominem attacks and insane
accusations you may make cannot change that.

The best thing to do for an injured animal is to take it to the
vet immediately. Anyone who argues against that simply does
not care about their animals as much as those who argue for it.
It's simple, no matter how much you foam at the mouth.

cybercat
November 9th 05, 07:05 PM
"whayface" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 9 Nov 2005 10:53:27 -0500, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
> >>Unless it was a pill-happy vet, he would not have
> >> prescribed antibiotics without an infection. So, the trip at that time
> >> would have been useless and he would have had to return once the
> >> infection set it. What he did was right, cleaned the wound, and monitor
> >> it. It got infected, and off to the vet he went. If it had not gotten
> >> infected, he would have saved one trip to the vet.
> >>
> >
> >It does nobody any good to argue for less effective care for
> >injured cats, Victor. The best thing to do for any injury is to
> >take the cat to the vet first. The only reason not to is because
> >you don't want to spend the money. When it comes to creatures
> >we love who are dependent on us, it is always better safe than
> >sorry.
> >
>
> If you do not want to spend money for proper care for your pet you should
find someone to
> take it that will care for it properly!!!

Are you addressing this to Victor? Because I, for one agree with you.

-L.
November 9th 05, 08:53 PM
cybercat wrote:
>
> No matter how you spin it you are arguing for less effective
> health care for cats

The *effective* way to treat the wound was to clean it and watch it.
The ineffective and wasteful way was to rush the cat to tthe vet.
Which YOU advocated.

> All the ad hominem attacks and insane
> accusations you may make cannot change that.
>
> The best thing to do for an injured animal is to take it to the
> vet immediately.

Um, no it isn't. The best thing to do is to assess the wound and make
a decision about whether or not it needs medical condition. You simply
lack common sense.

> Anyone who argues against that simply does
> not care about their animals as much as those who argue for it.
> It's simple, no matter how much you foam at the mouth.

You're the one coming off as a hyterical pet parent. I suppose you
rush off to the doctor for every paper cut and scrape too, LOL...

-L.

Steve G
November 9th 05, 11:16 PM
-L. wrote:
(...)
> You're the one coming off as a hyterical pet parent. I suppose you
> rush off to the doctor for every paper cut and scrape too, LOL...

My cat got a paper cut. Had to nuke him from orbit. Only way to be
sure.

S.

Ivor Jones
November 9th 05, 11:35 PM
"-L." > wrote in message
ups.com
> cybercat wrote:

[snip]

> > The best thing to do for an injured animal is to take
> > it to the vet immediately.
>
> Um, no it isn't. The best thing to do is to assess the
> wound and make a decision about whether or not it needs
> medical condition. You simply lack common sense.

Unless you have medical/veterinary training you do not have the necessary
knowledge to make such a decision. If you argue otherwise you are simply
*wrong* and that's an end to it.

Ivor

CatNipped
November 9th 05, 11:50 PM
"John Krystek" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> A quick update:
>
> We took Jinx to our cat clinic yesterday where the vet cleaned the
> wound (gauze and hydrogen peroxide) and prescribed antibiotics. Today
> the cut isn't looking too great - it's fairly infected and starting to
> get pussy, so we just cleaned it thoroughly with some warm soapy water.
> I hope it gets better soon as DW is starting to freak out at its
> gruesome appearance and it's only a matter of time before we run back
> to the vet.
>
> Latest picture shows the progression: http://www.krystek.net/JinxCut
>
> Updates will follow as he hopefully improves.
>
> - John

John, is there any way he could have been burned by something? When my
Bandit had her teeth cleaned in February of this year the vet used a "rice
filled" heating pad (a bag filled with rice that is heated in the microwave
before use). This caused a *really* bad burn that, unfortunately and
because of her long hair, did not show up right away. I only found it (on
her belly) when the hair fell out and by that time it was necrotic. I'm
asking because the fourth picture looks similar to Bandit's burn.

Hugs,

CatNipped

Lumpy
November 9th 05, 11:51 PM
"Steve G" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> -L. wrote:
> (...)
> > You're the one coming off as a hyterical pet parent. I suppose you
> > rush off to the doctor for every paper cut and scrape too, LOL...
>
> My cat got a paper cut. Had to nuke him from orbit. Only way to be
> sure.
>

You had to "nuke him from orbit?" What does that mean?

cybercat
November 9th 05, 11:55 PM
"Ivor Jones" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> "-L." > wrote in message
> ups.com
> > cybercat wrote:
>
> [snip]
>
> > > The best thing to do for an injured animal is to take
> > > it to the vet immediately.
> >
> > Um, no it isn't. The best thing to do is to assess the
> > wound and make a decision about whether or not it needs
> > medical condition. You simply lack common sense.
>
> Unless you have medical/veterinary training you do not have the necessary
> knowledge to make such a decision.

Quite true. And to recommend anything but a vet visit in a group
like this where many know next to nothing about cats is downright
irresponsible.

If you argue otherwise you are simply
> *wrong* and that's an end to it.
>

That would be "common sense" in my book. My vets can "laugh at
me" and thugs like Lyn can sneer at me for taking good care of my
cats, and that is fine with me as long as I know I've done the best
thing by my cats.

whitershadeofpale
November 10th 05, 12:02 AM
Ivor Jones wrote:
> "-L." > wrote in message
> ups.com
> > cybercat wrote:
>
> [snip]
>
> > > The best thing to do for an injured animal is to take
> > > it to the vet immediately.
> >
> > Um, no it isn't. The best thing to do is to assess the
> > wound and make a decision about whether or not it needs
> > medical condition. You simply lack common sense.
>
> Unless you have medical/veterinary training you do not have the necessary
> knowledge to make such a decision. If you argue otherwise you are simply
> *wrong* and that's an end to it.
>
> Ivor

In all fairness "common sense?"

There is no way you have read the last 50 posted questions and even
bring up the term common sense.

cart cat to vet is generic and Hellelujah!

What Iiii am hearing is that you have not brushed your cats teeth today

TELL ME IM LYING!

cybercat
November 10th 05, 12:11 AM
"whitershadeofpale" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Ivor Jones wrote:
> > "-L." > wrote in message
> > ups.com
> > > cybercat wrote:
> >
> > [snip]
> >
> > > > The best thing to do for an injured animal is to take
> > > > it to the vet immediately.
> > >
> > > Um, no it isn't. The best thing to do is to assess the
> > > wound and make a decision about whether or not it needs
> > > medical condition. You simply lack common sense.
> >
> > Unless you have medical/veterinary training you do not have the
necessary
> > knowledge to make such a decision. If you argue otherwise you are simply
> > *wrong* and that's an end to it.
> >
> > Ivor
>
> In all fairness "common sense?"
>
> There is no way you have read the last 50 posted questions and even
> bring up the term common sense.

Ivor did not bring up the term "common sense." Lyn did. She thinks
those who take their animals to a vet at the first sign of illness or
injury lack "common sense." She recommends that people who
have no medical or vet training evaluate the illness or injury so
that they can judge whether or not the cat needs a vet--this is
common sense to Lyn.

>
> cart cat to vet is generic and Hellelujah!
>
> What Iiii am hearing is that you have not brushed your cats teeth today
>
> TELL ME IM LYING!
>

I will tell you that it is really nice seeing you find
the courtesy to include a snippet of the post to which
you are replying. Unfortunately, due to the way you
posted I still have no clue to who you are addressing.

I may be wrong but I thought the point was "communication."

whitershadeofpale
November 10th 05, 12:49 AM
cybercat wrote:

> Ivor did not bring up the term "common sense." Lyn did. She thinks
> those who take their animals to a vet at the first sign of illness or
> injury lack "common sense." She recommends that people who
> have no medical or vet training evaluate the illness or injury so
> that they can judge whether or not the cat needs a vet--this is
> common sense to Lyn.
>

I stand corrected.

> > cart cat to vet is generic and Hellelujah!
> >
> > What Iiii am hearing is that you have not brushed your cats teeth today
> >
> > TELL ME IM LYING!
> >
>
> I will tell you that it is really nice seeing you find
> the courtesy to include a snippet of the post to which
> you are replying. Unfortunately, due to the way you
> posted I still have no clue to who you are addressing.

I smell ya, but all this spanking has got me kinda turned around

> I may be wrong but I thought the point was "communication."

yeah, if you hit the google reply button, it opens a text field, and
makes for a quick reply.
(no good for some readers I see)

Rhonda
November 10th 05, 01:23 AM
Ivor Jones wrote:

> "-L." > wrote in message
> ups.com
>
>>cybercat wrote:
>>
>
> [snip]
>
>
>>>The best thing to do for an injured animal is to take
>>>it to the vet immediately.
>>>
>>Um, no it isn't. The best thing to do is to assess the
>>wound and make a decision about whether or not it needs
>>medical condition. You simply lack common sense.
>>
>
> Unless you have medical/veterinary training you do not have the necessary
> knowledge to make such a decision. If you argue otherwise you are simply
> *wrong* and that's an end to it.


But do you access your own wounds without a doctor's degree? Do you look
to see if it's major or minor cut or scrape before going to the doctor,
or should that only be determined by someone with a medical degree?

As for our cats, we do not take them to the vet for every cut. If it is
small and not infected, we will clean it with peroxide and put on an
antibiotic -- just as we do for ourselves.

I'm not sure what the argument is here, are there people that take cats
to vets every time they have a scrape no matter how small, or is the
argument that this particular cat should have been taken in right away?

Rhonda

shortfuse
November 10th 05, 01:26 AM
">> Unless you have medical/veterinary training you do not have the
necessary
>> knowledge to make such a decision. If you argue otherwise you are simply
>> *wrong* and that's an end to it.
>
>
> But do you access your own wounds without a doctor's degree? Do you look
> to see if it's major or minor cut or scrape before going to the doctor, or
> should that only be determined by someone with a medical degree?
>
> As for our cats, we do not take them to the vet for every cut. If it is
> small and not infected, we will clean it with peroxide and put on an
> antibiotic -- just as we do for ourselves.
>
> I'm not sure what the argument is here, are there people that take cats to
> vets every time they have a scrape no matter how small, or is the argument
> that this particular cat should have been taken in right away?
>
> Rhonda
>
> I usually will doctor my cat if its a scrape but will call the vet to
> check on whether I am doing the correct thing, and if they deem it
> necessary to bring them in, I will do so.
>
>
>
>
>
>

-L.
November 10th 05, 01:48 AM
Ivor Jones wrote:
>
> Unless you have medical/veterinary training you do not have the necessary
> knowledge to make such a decision.

Oh bull****. You assess your own wounds all the time and those of your
children. Unless you are a complete moron who runs to the doctor at
the faintest sign of blood.

> If you argue otherwise you are simply
> *wrong* and that's an end to it.
>

Go ahead and waste your money - I dont care.

-L.

-L.
November 10th 05, 01:55 AM
cybercat wrote:
> Ivor did not bring up the term "common sense." Lyn did. She thinks
> those who take their animals to a vet at the first sign of illness or
> injury lack "common sense."

Of course they do. Many illness and injuries pets get are minor and do
not need veterinary treatement. Ever hear of the concept of "first
aid"? There are books written about it. Yeah, really, there are!
Those books give guidelines for the idiot lay person about things to
look for - you might actually pick one up and read it some time.

>She recommends that people who
> have no medical or vet training evaluate the illness or injury so
> that they can judge whether or not the cat needs a vet--this is
> common sense to Lyn.

Of course it is - and it is common sense to 99% of pet owners. It's
only idiots like you who cart their cat off to the vet for every little
sneeze, scrape or hiccup. But go ahead and waste your money, time, and
the vet's time. No skin off my nose.
-L.

-L.
November 10th 05, 01:57 AM
Rhonda wrote:
> But do you access your own wounds without a doctor's degree? Do you look
> to see if it's major or minor cut or scrape before going to the doctor,
> or should that only be determined by someone with a medical degree?
>
> As for our cats, we do not take them to the vet for every cut. If it is
> small and not infected, we will clean it with peroxide and put on an
> antibiotic -- just as we do for ourselves.
>
> I'm not sure what the argument is here, are there people that take cats
> to vets every time they have a scrape no matter how small, or is the
> argument that this particular cat should have been taken in right away?

Mary/Topaz/Lumpy/cybercat/you-know-her-real-name is advocating taking
the cat - any cat - to the vet at first sign of injury or illness.
Which is just silly.

-L.

-L.
November 10th 05, 02:03 AM
shortfuse wrote:
> >
> I usually will doctor my cat if its a scrape but will call the vet to
>check on whether I am doing the correct thing, and if they deem it
> necessary to bring them in, I will do so.

Oh lookie, Mary/Topaz/Lumpy/whateversockyouare today: Someone with
some common sense. Please take notes.

The vet will ask you questions about how the cat was injured, if the
wound is bleeding, and the behavior of the cat. From there they will
usually tell you to observe the wound for 24 hours and call if it gets
worse.
-L.

cybercat
November 10th 05, 05:08 AM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Ivor Jones wrote:
>
> > "-L." > wrote in message
> > ups.com
> >
> >>cybercat wrote:
> >>
> >
> > [snip]
> >
> >
> >>>The best thing to do for an injured animal is to take
> >>>it to the vet immediately.
> >>>
> >>Um, no it isn't. The best thing to do is to assess the
> >>wound and make a decision about whether or not it needs
> >>medical condition. You simply lack common sense.
> >>
> >
> > Unless you have medical/veterinary training you do not have the
necessary
> > knowledge to make such a decision. If you argue otherwise you are simply
> > *wrong* and that's an end to it.
>
>
> But do you access your own wounds without a doctor's degree? Do you look
> to see if it's major or minor cut or scrape before going to the doctor,
> or should that only be determined by someone with a medical degree?
>
> As for our cats, we do not take them to the vet for every cut. If it is
> small and not infected, we will clean it with peroxide and put on an
> antibiotic -- just as we do for ourselves.
>
> I'm not sure what the argument is here, are there people that take cats
> to vets every time they have a scrape no matter how small, or is the
> argument that this particular cat should have been taken in right away?
>

The OP posted a few days ago with the story and a photo of the cut.
Some said he should not take his cat in to the vet, some said he should.
He did not. Two days later the cut was infected. He is now taking the
cat to the vet.

You figure it out.

cybercat
November 10th 05, 05:18 AM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> Ivor Jones wrote:
>
> > "-L." > wrote in message
> > ups.com
> >
> >>cybercat wrote:
> >>
> >
> > [snip]
> >
> >
> >>>The best thing to do for an injured animal is to take
> >>>it to the vet immediately.
> >>>
> >>Um, no it isn't. The best thing to do is to assess the
> >>wound and make a decision about whether or not it needs
> >>medical condition. You simply lack common sense.
> >>
> >
> > Unless you have medical/veterinary training you do not have the
necessary
> > knowledge to make such a decision. If you argue otherwise you are simply
> > *wrong* and that's an end to it.
>
>
> But do you access your own wounds without a doctor's degree? Do you look
> to see if it's major or minor cut or scrape before going to the doctor,
> or should that only be determined by someone with a medical degree?

That is not the same thing as assessing my cat's injury, to me. I am *in* my
own skin and have been for a while. I have a number of years of experience
with my own injuries and illnesses. I can feel my own pain. It is a
completely
different thing with a cat in my care. Do I need to spell it out?

From my point of view, we all have different comfort levels with assessing
injuries and illnesses of our cats, for a variety of reasons. First among
them
is the fact that we have varying levels of experience and knowledge of cats
and their physiology. Second is the fact that some of us would rather spend
the money they might spend at the vet making sure their cat is okay on other
things. Third is the fact that some of us derive our senses of self worth
from
how big we can puff ourselves up in Usenet groups using our self-proclaimed
knowledge of cats in terms of injury and illness. And then there is the
unfortunate fact that far too many authoritarian personalities with severe
self esteem issues seek out pet and child guardianship so that they might
feel superior to someone, something, anyone, anything. In this case,
anything
goes. Anything at all, as long as the narcissistic piece of **** can end up
feeling better about his or herself. The latter is the type who might, for
example, worry about whether or not their vet is laughing at them for
bringing their cat in just to be sure she is okay. Normal people just want
to
be sure the cat they love is okay.

But that is just my point of view. :)

-L.
November 10th 05, 08:23 AM
cybercat wrote:
<snip>

>
> From my point of view, we all have different comfort levels with assessing
> injuries and illnesses of our cats, for a variety of reasons. First among
> them
> is the fact that we have varying levels of experience and knowledge of cats
> and their physiology.

It's not neuroscience - it's a scratch.

>Second is the fact that some of us would rather spend
> the money they might spend at the vet making sure their cat is okay on other
> things. Third is the fact that some of us derive our senses of self worth
> from
> how big we can puff ourselves up in Usenet groups using our self-proclaimed
> knowledge of cats in terms of injury and illness. And then there is the
> unfortunate fact that far too many authoritarian personalities with severe
> self esteem issues seek out pet and child guardianship so that they might
> feel superior to someone, something, anyone, anything. In this case,
> anything
> goes. Anything at all, as long as the narcissistic piece of **** can end up
> feeling better about his or herself. The latter is the type who might, for
> example, worry about whether or not their vet is laughing at them for
> bringing their cat in just to be sure she is okay.

....Or maybe, just maybe, they statements like this...

"The best thing to do for an injured animal is to take it to the
vet immediately. Anyone who argues against that simply does
not care about their animals as much as those who argue for it. "

....so that they can feel superior to those whose opinions they don't
share in order to compensate for their own lack of self-esteem? So
that they can tell themselves that they love their cats more than
others, again, to compensate for that same lack of self-worth?

Why don't you take a LONG look at whom in this newsgroup has experience
in veterinary medicine, in shelters, as a volunteer, and does rescue.
A "normal person" (your quote) would recognize experience when they
see it and not be threatened by it.

Enough said.

-L.

-L.
November 10th 05, 08:27 AM
cybercat wrote:
> The OP posted a few days ago with the story and a photo of the cut.
> Some said he should not take his cat in to the vet, some said he should.
> He did not. Two days later the cut was infected.

The *scrape* was also exascerbated by the cat scratching it - it was
now NOT the same wound. Had the cat not scratched the *scrape* it
would most likely have healed well in a couple of days, without
infection. From the photos and the description, the wound *clearly*
did not need professional medical attention.

>He is now taking the
> cat to the vet.
>
> You figure it out.

You're the one who is obtuse as a triangle.

-L.