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gravatiaX
November 7th 05, 05:31 AM
Hi-
I adopted 2 beautiful brothers from the animal shelter on Sept 29. The
shelter told us that they were 2 yrs old and that they were originally
brought in sometime in Feb 05. Then (not sure when), someone adopted
them, only to return them to the shelter in early Sept. After a
check-up, our vet said that they were probably born in Feburary and
were no more than 9 mths old. I guess you can't always trust them to
keep track of so many animals....
Anyway, tonight we discovered some writing on Julius, it looks like a
Sharpie. There seems to be crudely written and large numbers and
letters on his belly, but he won't sit still so we can make it out. My
question is: is this how tattoos are always done (sloppily on the lower
belly), and do shelters do this often? If so, how come we weren't told
about the tattoo? My greatest fear is that some previous owner will
knock on my door wanting them back. Has anyone else adopted a tattooed
cat?
Thanks

Karen
November 7th 05, 05:53 AM
On 2005-11-06 22:31:38 -0600, "gravatiaX" > said:

> Hi-
> I adopted 2 beautiful brothers from the animal shelter on Sept 29. The
> shelter told us that they were 2 yrs old and that they were originally
> brought in sometime in Feb 05. Then (not sure when), someone adopted
> them, only to return them to the shelter in early Sept. After a
> check-up, our vet said that they were probably born in Feburary and
> were no more than 9 mths old. I guess you can't always trust them to
> keep track of so many animals....
> Anyway, tonight we discovered some writing on Julius, it looks like a
> Sharpie. There seems to be crudely written and large numbers and
> letters on his belly, but he won't sit still so we can make it out. My
> question is: is this how tattoos are always done (sloppily on the lower
> belly), and do shelters do this often? If so, how come we weren't told
> about the tattoo? My greatest fear is that some previous owner will
> knock on my door wanting them back. Has anyone else adopted a tattooed
> cat?
> Thanks

I think tatoos are usually on the ears. That's pretty wierd!!

Lumpy
November 7th 05, 06:18 AM
"gravatiaX" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Hi-
> I adopted 2 beautiful brothers from the animal shelter on Sept 29. [..][

> Anyway, tonight we discovered some writing on Julius, it looks like a
> Sharpie. There seems to be crudely written and large numbers and
> letters on his belly, but he won't sit still so we can make it out.

Wow. I hope you can get a good look. I would love to see a photo
of this.

But most importantly, thank you for saving these lovely boys and giving
them a forever home.

-L.
November 7th 05, 08:37 AM
gravatiaX wrote:
> Hi-
> I adopted 2 beautiful brothers from the animal shelter on Sept 29. The
> shelter told us that they were 2 yrs old and that they were originally
> brought in sometime in Feb 05. Then (not sure when), someone adopted
> them, only to return them to the shelter in early Sept. After a
> check-up, our vet said that they were probably born in Feburary and
> were no more than 9 mths old. I guess you can't always trust them to
> keep track of so many animals....
> Anyway, tonight we discovered some writing on Julius, it looks like a
> Sharpie. There seems to be crudely written and large numbers and
> letters on his belly, but he won't sit still so we can make it out. My
> question is: is this how tattoos are always done (sloppily on the lower
> belly), and do shelters do this often?

Shelters usually don't - some vets sell this as an ID method. You may
find that it is an ID code and a phone number - and that the phone
number rings a vet.

> If so, how come we weren't told
> about the tattoo? My greatest fear is that some previous owner will
> knock on my door wanting them back. Has anyone else adopted a tattooed
> cat?

I wouldn't worry about that - the shelter probably already followed the
lead if it is indeed an ID number and a phone number. Have the cat
microchipped and keep your adoption papers - that will be enough to
prove ownership.

-L.

-L.
November 7th 05, 08:38 AM
Karen wrote:
>
> I think tatoos are usually on the ears. That's pretty wierd!!

I have seen it a few times- always on the belly. Ear tatoos usually
are used in research labs and for things like Cattle and larger
animals. Some breeders may do so with their breeding stock.
-L.

November 7th 05, 07:10 PM
"-L." > wrote:

>
>Karen wrote:
>>
>> I think tatoos are usually on the ears. That's pretty wierd!!
>
>I have seen it a few times- always on the belly. Ear tatoos usually
>are used in research labs and for things like Cattle and larger
>animals. Some breeders may do so with their breeding stock.
>-L.

One of our cats was ear tattooed by the vet that did his initial
checkup (he was a feral kitten). In fact ear tattoos are common.
-mhd

gravatiaX
November 7th 05, 08:41 PM
Thanks for the help, everyone. I'll bet a former vet tattooed these
guys -- I had never seen one on the belly, though.
I hate to think that my boys were "passed around" and had to live in
the shelter twice! It makes me more determined to keep them happy and
spoiled!

Snittens
November 8th 05, 03:32 AM
> wrote
> One of our cats was ear tattooed by the vet that did his initial
> checkup (he was a feral kitten). In fact ear tattoos are common.
> -mhd

A group that does feral TNR around here does ear tattoos to ID the cats they
have done. We get some that have tattoos at the shelter from them, when a
friendly cat gets mixed up in their feral colonies.

-Kelly

-L.
November 8th 05, 03:42 AM
Snittens wrote:
> A group that does feral TNR around here does ear tattoos to ID the cats they
> have done. We get some that have tattoos at the shelter from them, when a
> friendly cat gets mixed up in their feral colonies.
>
> -Kelly

Most TNR programs I have met nick or crop the ears so the cats can be
spotted from afar. IMO, it's a much better system.
-L.

Snittens
November 8th 05, 05:19 AM
"-L." > wrote
>
> Most TNR programs I have met nick or crop the ears so the cats can be
> spotted from afar. IMO, it's a much better system.
> -L.
>

Oh, actually they do that too. The tattoo is the cat's ID number with the
group, for medical records purposes. I think they round them up once a year
(?? not sure) and vaccinate them. The friendly cats that got TNR'ed by the
group usually adopt more quickly because it's such a tug at the heartstrings
story to tell and people think the tipped ear is unique.

-Kelly

cybercat
November 8th 05, 05:24 AM
"Snittens" > wrote :

> The friendly cats that got TNR'ed by the
> group usually adopt more quickly because it's such a tug at the
heartstrings
> story to tell and people think the tipped ear is unique.
>

The tipped ear is disfigurement. I cannot understand how cat
lovers can condone the practice.

November 8th 05, 05:35 AM
"cybercat" > wrote:

>
>"Snittens" > wrote :
>
>> The friendly cats that got TNR'ed by the
>> group usually adopt more quickly because it's such a tug at the
>heartstrings
>> story to tell and people think the tipped ear is unique.
>>
>
>The tipped ear is disfigurement. I cannot understand how cat
>lovers can condone the practice.
>

I feel that way about it too. Hopefully the reasonable explanation is
that there are benefits that outweigh any discomfort .

-mhd

cybercat
November 8th 05, 05:41 AM
> wrote in message
...
> "cybercat" > wrote:
>
> >
> >"Snittens" > wrote :
> >
> >> The friendly cats that got TNR'ed by the
> >> group usually adopt more quickly because it's such a tug at the
> >heartstrings
> >> story to tell and people think the tipped ear is unique.
> >>
> >
> >The tipped ear is disfigurement. I cannot understand how cat
> >lovers can condone the practice.
> >
>
> I feel that way about it too. Hopefully the reasonable explanation is
> that there are benefits that outweigh any discomfort .
>

That's the argument, but there has to be a better way to mark them
than to ruin the perfect symmetry of these amazing creatures. Anyway,
it is nice to know I am not alone in feeling bothered by it.

-L.
November 8th 05, 10:36 AM
Snittens wrote:
> "-L." > wrote
> >
> > Most TNR programs I have met nick or crop the ears so the cats can be
> > spotted from afar. IMO, it's a much better system.
> > -L.
> >
>
> Oh, actually they do that too. The tattoo is the cat's ID number with the
> group, for medical records purposes. I think they round them up once a year
> (?? not sure) and vaccinate them.

Damn, they're lucky if they can. Most TNR programs I know of feel
lucky if they can catch them once to neuter them. So many of them
become trap-wary.

>The friendly cats that got TNR'ed by the
> group usually adopt more quickly because it's such a tug at the heartstrings
> story to tell and people think the tipped ear is unique.
>

LOL....I know. :) Everybody always feels sorry for them.
-L.

-L.

Snittens
November 8th 05, 11:07 PM
"cybercat" > wrote
> The tipped ear is disfigurement. I cannot understand how cat
> lovers can condone the practice.
>
>

Well, I'm drawing a blank at how else you can tell from a distance if a cat
has already been spayed/neutered. Any ideas? I'm sure the feral groups
would love to hear them.

--
-Kelly

-L.
November 9th 05, 01:11 AM
Snittens wrote:
> "cybercat" > wrote
> > The tipped ear is disfigurement. I cannot understand how cat
> > lovers can condone the practice.
> >
> >
>
> Well, I'm drawing a blank at how else you can tell from a distance if a cat
> has already been spayed/neutered. Any ideas? I'm sure the feral groups
> would love to hear them.
>
> --
> -Kelly

Don't you know, Kelly? We are supposed to hold them down, shave their
tummies to look for a scar that may or may not be there even if they
are spayed, and/or palpitate their balls to see if they have nuggets,
which may or may not work considering how cold it is outside. All
right out there in the field, in the dead of the night. You know,
feral cats are all soooo docile!. Silly girl!
-L.

cybercat
November 9th 05, 01:28 AM
"Snittens" > wrote in message
...
> "cybercat" > wrote
> > The tipped ear is disfigurement. I cannot understand how cat
> > lovers can condone the practice.
> >
> >
>
> Well, I'm drawing a blank at how else you can tell from a distance if a
cat
> has already been spayed/neutered. Any ideas? I'm sure the feral groups
> would love to hear them.
>

Did I SAY there was a better way for the volunteers to CONVENIENTLY
identify neutered animals, which is what you are really talking about when
you insist that they must be able to tell from a distance? I said exactly
what I meant:
"The tipped ear is disfigurement. I cannot understand how cat lovers can
condone
the practice." The latter statement derives from the same place in me that
has a
really hard time understanding how alleged cat lovers can recommend that
someone who loves a cat but is having problems with it should return
it to a kill shelter. It may be convenient but it still sucks for the cat.

It IS disfigurement, and I hate the idea of disfiguring animals for any
reason. In
this case it is done for the convenience of the people who are
participating in
programs that will keep the cats from breeding, but it is still done for
their
convenience. After all, if you can trap an animal to have it neutered, you
can
trap an animal to check to see if it has BEEN neutered. Therefore it is not
actually necessary to cut off the tip of the cat's ear in order to be sure
it is neutered,
it is just easier for those participating in the program. A tattoo would be
much
better, but much more trouble for those trapping the cats.

The reasoning is, no doubt, that these wonderful, compassionate people are
giving their time and resources to a bunch of unloved and unwanted cats, so
make it as convenient for them as possible, even if it means cutting off a
part
of the cat's ear.

Snittens
November 9th 05, 02:00 AM
> The reasoning is, no doubt, that these wonderful, compassionate people are
> giving their time and resources to a bunch of unloved and unwanted cats,
> so
> make it as convenient for them as possible, even if it means cutting off a
> part
> of the cat's ear.
>

The choices are: tip the cat's ear, repeatedly trap and anesthetize the cat
to check for a spay scar or feel the balls. Yes, you have to knock out a
feral cat to check for these things. Or trap the cat repeatedly to check
for a tattoo. Both of the last two choices involve repeatedly stressing out
the cat. Do you have any research of ear tipping causing harm to cats?
Which is better for the cat?
--
-Kelly

Snittens
November 9th 05, 02:05 AM
"-L." > wrote
> Damn, they're lucky if they can. Most TNR programs I know of feel
> lucky if they can catch them once to neuter them. So many of them
> become trap-wary.

I'm not sure how successful they are on vetting after the initial trapping,
but when we get a cat from them, the cat comes with records with the tattoo
number on it.

--
-Kelly

-L.
November 9th 05, 02:14 AM
cybercat wrote:
>After all, if you can trap an animal to have it neutered, you
> can
> trap an animal to check to see if it has BEEN neutered.

The tipped ear signals the cat is neutered *whether or not it is
trapped*.

A TTVNR program is not going to spend money, time, energy and resources
transporting a cat, having it sedated and paying a vet to determine if
it has been neutered, if they can help it. The only way to determine
if the cat's already been TTVNR'd is to have some external visual cue.
The tipped ear is the UNIVERSAL cue to anyone who works in pet rescue -
vets, shelters, those who run feral colonies, people who do TTVNR. No
matter where that cat ends up, the ear tells people it's a neutered
cat. A tipped-eared cat in a trap is released immediately so the
resources can be used to focus on cats who need the service.


>Therefore it is not
> actually necessary to cut off the tip of the cat's ear in order to be sure
> it is neutered

Um, yes, it is. What other *easily seen* visual cue do you suggest?
It has to be easy to see on a trapped cat that is constantly moving,
snarling, growling, lunging, hissing, swatting and trying to bite. It
has to be seen at a distance when one is looking to trap a single stray
for TTVNR. I wish there was some way to permanently dye the ear, but
there isn't.

,
> it is just easier for those participating in the program. A tattoo would be
> much
> better, but much more trouble for those trapping the cats.

You can't usually see a tatoo, especially at a distance. Most cats have
to have their ears shaved to see a tatoo. Tatoos don't work on
dark-skinned cats. Tatoos cost money to do, tipping is free. Tipping
works well on all cats.

>
> The reasoning is, no doubt, that these wonderful, compassionate people are
> giving their time and resources to a bunch of unloved and unwanted cats, so
> make it as convenient for them as possible, even if it means cutting off a
> part
> of the cat's ear.

If there was a way to do it without tipping the ear, it would be done.

Seriously, and I don't mean this snarkily - spend some major time at a
local shelter. You will better understand why things are done the way
they are in animal rescue. It is a process and experience that will
change your life forever - in so many ways.

WRT "the way things are done" at shelters - the "returning the cat to
the shelter" recommendation isn't merely for the benefit of the hapless
adoptor - it benefits the cat, it benefits the shelter. More often
than not, cats who end up with people like Phillip end up being dumped
- and being dumped is a FAR worse fate that being euthanized. When one
returns a cat, it tells a GOOD shelter not to adopt another cat to this
person (I understand that the OC shelter did - fie on them!) and in the
process, a GOOD shelter will cousel the person about what went wrong,
hopefully making sure it doesn't happen again. They will also assess
their screning process and try to determine where they went wrong in
placing the cat in the first place. In every shelter I have worked
at, returned animals get special consideration for time on death row.
So, you see, it isn't just a black-and-white issue. Some fates are
worse than being euthanized, and education is the ultime goal of the
process. In an ideal world, people like Phillip would work with the
animal - do whatever it takes to make the situation work, for life.
But people (in general) aren't like that - it is the rare person who
commits to an animal for life. Shelters realize this, and that's why
they make the recommendations they do. Animals in this society are
seen as disposable - and it's sickening. And the shelters have to work
the system in such a way to try to educate people to think differently
about animals. The only way to do that is to get people like Phillip
back in the door.

I hope you will take this post in the light it was offered - no
animosity, no flames.

-L.

whitershadeofpale
November 9th 05, 05:47 AM
gravatiaX wrote:
> Hi-
> I adopted 2 beautiful brothers from the animal shelter on Sept 29. The
> shelter told us that they were 2 yrs old and that they were originally
> brought in sometime in Feb 05. Then (not sure when), someone adopted
> them, only to return them to the shelter in early Sept. After a
> check-up, our vet said that they were probably born in Feburary and
> were no more than 9 mths old. I guess you can't always trust them to
> keep track of so many animals....
> Anyway, tonight we discovered some writing on Julius, it looks like a
> Sharpie. There seems to be crudely written and large numbers and
> letters on his belly, but he won't sit still so we can make it out. My
> question is: is this how tattoos are always done (sloppily on the lower
> belly), and do shelters do this often? If so, how come we weren't told
> about the tattoo? My greatest fear is that some previous owner will
> knock on my door wanting them back. Has anyone else adopted a tattooed
> cat?
> Thanks

I seen a calender in the mall it was 12 pictures of painted cats.

I have also seen a painted cat on the movie "meet the fockers

nothing to do with tatoos, but still changing the leapords spots

Kalyahna
November 12th 05, 05:02 AM
"gravatiaX" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Hi-
> I adopted 2 beautiful brothers from the animal shelter on Sept 29. The
> shelter told us that they were 2 yrs old and that they were originally
> brought in sometime in Feb 05. Then (not sure when), someone adopted
> them, only to return them to the shelter in early Sept. After a
> check-up, our vet said that they were probably born in Feburary and
> were no more than 9 mths old. I guess you can't always trust them to
> keep track of so many animals....

Unless the shelter staff is incredibly inept, I can't imagine they mixed up
'newborn kitten' with '2 yrs old.' Since, if they were first brought in in
Feb
and your vet says they were first born then, they would obviously be
newborn kittens.

> Anyway, tonight we discovered some writing on Julius, it looks like a
> Sharpie. There seems to be crudely written and large numbers and
> letters on his belly, but he won't sit still so we can make it out. My
> question is: is this how tattoos are always done (sloppily on the lower
> belly), and do shelters do this often? If so, how come we weren't told
> about the tattoo? My greatest fear is that some previous owner will
> knock on my door wanting them back. Has anyone else adopted a tattooed
> cat?
> Thanks

If they're going to tattoo, they're not going to do it in permanent marker.
Though if the cats were quite young when marked, that would explain the
larger writing now - expanding with the cats' growth.

As for being told about it... if they're both male, their bellies wouldn't
have
been shaved for anything, so it could easily have been completely
overlooked.

November 14th 05, 10:58 AM
I wish there was some way to permanently dye the ear, but there isn't.

That would be a funny site, seeing a load of feral kitties all with one
bright orange florescent ear!

IBen Getiner
November 14th 05, 11:09 AM
Karen wrote:
> On 2005-11-06 22:31:38 -0600, "gravatiaX" > said:
>
> > Hi-
> > I adopted 2 beautiful brothers from the animal shelter on Sept 29. The
> > shelter told us that they were 2 yrs old and that they were originally
> > brought in sometime in Feb 05. Then (not sure when), someone adopted
> > them, only to return them to the shelter in early Sept. After a
> > check-up, our vet said that they were probably born in Feburary and
> > were no more than 9 mths old. I guess you can't always trust them to
> > keep track of so many animals....
> > Anyway, tonight we discovered some writing on Julius, it looks like a
> > Sharpie. There seems to be crudely written and large numbers and
> > letters on his belly, but he won't sit still so we can make it out. My
> > question is: is this how tattoos are always done (sloppily on the lower
> > belly), and do shelters do this often? If so, how come we weren't told
> > about the tattoo? My greatest fear is that some previous owner will
> > knock on my door wanting them back. Has anyone else adopted a tattooed
> > cat?
> > Thanks
>
> I think tatoos are usually on the ears. That's pretty wierd!!

They aren't in the form of three sixes, are they.....??


LOL..!!


IBen