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Juls
November 11th 05, 10:45 PM
Jasmine (age about 5-6 months) has been doing some panting after
strenuous exercise and so I've made an appointment to have her checked
for cardiomyopathy.

What I'm wondering is how is this diagnosed? The panting is her only
symptom, so I'm hopeful it's just that she doesn't know when to quit
running.

My vet does not have a sonogram machine. Is a sonogram an absolute must?

Juls

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Larry
November 12th 05, 01:00 AM
My Sammy has a grade III/VI heart murmur. He then had an electrocardiogram.
That is just an ultrasound with a special machine. The machine can measure
many things like size of heart and the thickness of the heart wall. An
x-ray might show something but an ultrasound would be better.

--
Larry - Owned by ten cats
"Juls" > wrote in message
...
> Jasmine (age about 5-6 months) has been doing some panting after
> strenuous exercise and so I've made an appointment to have her checked
> for cardiomyopathy.
>
> What I'm wondering is how is this diagnosed? The panting is her only
> symptom, so I'm hopeful it's just that she doesn't know when to quit
> running.
>
> My vet does not have a sonogram machine. Is a sonogram an absolute must?
>
> Juls
>
> --
> Email (remove annoying hyphens)
> j-u-l-i-AT-e-c-t-DOT-o-r-g

Karen
November 12th 05, 01:25 AM
On 2005-11-11 16:45:32 -0600, Juls > said:

> Jasmine (age about 5-6 months) has been doing some panting after
> strenuous exercise and so I've made an appointment to have her checked
> for cardiomyopathy.
>
> What I'm wondering is how is this diagnosed? The panting is her only
> symptom, so I'm hopeful it's just that she doesn't know when to quit
> running.
>
> My vet does not have a sonogram machine. Is a sonogram an absolute must?
>
> Juls

If you are really worried about it, you would want an ultrasound. When
is her appt?

Juls
November 12th 05, 01:31 AM
In article <2005111119254627590%[email protected]>,
Karen > wrote:

> On 2005-11-11 16:45:32 -0600, Juls > said:
>
> > Jasmine (age about 5-6 months) has been doing some panting after
> > strenuous exercise and so I've made an appointment to have her checked
> > for cardiomyopathy.
> >
> > What I'm wondering is how is this diagnosed? The panting is her only
> > symptom, so I'm hopeful it's just that she doesn't know when to quit
> > running.
> >
> > My vet does not have a sonogram machine. Is a sonogram an absolute must?
> >
> > Juls
>
> If you are really worried about it, you would want an ultrasound. When
> is her appt?

Wednesday. I guess I'm worried that my vet will listen to her heart and
say she's fine...and then what. I just want what's best for Jas.

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cybercat
November 12th 05, 01:40 AM
"Juls" > wrote

> Wednesday. I guess I'm worried that my vet will listen to her heart and
> say she's fine...and then what. I just want what's best for Jas.
>

If her heart sounds fine, but you are still worried, have an ultrasound to
make sure.

My cat has fainting spells. Her heart sounded fine, albeit fast. We had an
ultrasound
at my regular vet's--it cost $260 and she was awake for it, and the worst
she got
was a shaved chest. Her heart is fine, though she is on a beta blocker to
keep
the beat slowed down so that she will not have fibrillation, which is what
we think
caused the fainting spells.

Joe Canuck
November 12th 05, 01:42 AM
Juls wrote:

> In article <2005111119254627590%[email protected]>,
> Karen > wrote:
>
>
>>On 2005-11-11 16:45:32 -0600, Juls > said:
>>
>>
>>>Jasmine (age about 5-6 months) has been doing some panting after
>>>strenuous exercise and so I've made an appointment to have her checked
>>>for cardiomyopathy.
>>>
>>>What I'm wondering is how is this diagnosed? The panting is her only
>>>symptom, so I'm hopeful it's just that she doesn't know when to quit
>>>running.
>>>
>>>My vet does not have a sonogram machine. Is a sonogram an absolute must?
>>>
>>>Juls
>>
>>If you are really worried about it, you would want an ultrasound. When
>>is her appt?
>
>
> Wednesday. I guess I'm worried that my vet will listen to her heart and
> say she's fine...and then what. I just want what's best for Jas.
>

Ultrasound is the only way, listening doesn't diagnose the issue.

Karen
November 12th 05, 01:43 AM
On 2005-11-11 19:31:14 -0600, Juls > said:

> In article <2005111119254627590%[email protected]>,
> Karen > wrote:
>
>> On 2005-11-11 16:45:32 -0600, Juls > said:
>>
>>> Jasmine (age about 5-6 months) has been doing some panting after
>>> strenuous exercise and so I've made an appointment to have her checked
>>> for cardiomyopathy.
>>>
>>> What I'm wondering is how is this diagnosed? The panting is her only
>>> symptom, so I'm hopeful it's just that she doesn't know when to quit
>>> running.
>>>
>>> My vet does not have a sonogram machine. Is a sonogram an absolute must?
>>>
>>> Juls
>>
>> If you are really worried about it, you would want an ultrasound. When
>> is her appt?
>
> Wednesday. I guess I'm worried that my vet will listen to her heart and
> say she's fine...and then what. I just want what's best for Jas.

Well, I think you have to make that call. I will say again, I had the
same trouble with SUgar at that age. I've never had a cat that didn't
know when to stop, but she sure didn't. We've never had any trouble
with her heart. I've seen people post it before. So, I don't think it
is that rare at that age.

cybercat
November 12th 05, 03:15 AM
"Joe Canuck" > wrote

> Ultrasound is the only way, listening doesn't diagnose the issue.
>

And in fact ultrasound may only diagnose structural problems
or "regular" function problems. In other words, my kitty's behavior
suggests that she fibrillates (or her heart beats irregularly for short
periods) and yet the ultrasound showed a normal heart.

Juls
November 12th 05, 04:14 AM
In article >, "cybercat" >
wrote:

> "Joe Canuck" > wrote
>
> > Ultrasound is the only way, listening doesn't diagnose the issue.
> >
>
> And in fact ultrasound may only diagnose structural problems
> or "regular" function problems. In other words, my kitty's behavior
> suggests that she fibrillates (or her heart beats irregularly for short
> periods) and yet the ultrasound showed a normal heart.

Well, this is all very helpful, and I thank you all. I guess I'll just
play it by ear next week.

I do feel more optimistic hearing of others whose kittens didn't know
when to stop. Jas is sure like that, and with the laser dot, she just
won't quit. I've never seen a kitten who goes like she does.

--
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cybercat
November 12th 05, 04:20 AM
"Juls" > wrote in message
...
> In article >, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
> > "Joe Canuck" > wrote
> >
> > > Ultrasound is the only way, listening doesn't diagnose the issue.
> > >
> >
> > And in fact ultrasound may only diagnose structural problems
> > or "regular" function problems. In other words, my kitty's behavior
> > suggests that she fibrillates (or her heart beats irregularly for short
> > periods) and yet the ultrasound showed a normal heart.
>
> Well, this is all very helpful, and I thank you all. I guess I'll just
> play it by ear next week.
>
> I do feel more optimistic hearing of others whose kittens didn't know
> when to stop. Jas is sure like that, and with the laser dot, she just
> won't quit. I've never seen a kitten who goes like she does.
>
> --

Juls--try not to worry. I have seen your photos of Jasmine, and she
looks like an angel--I can tell you really love her. It will be okay.
She could not be in better hands. (P.S. She might calm down
after she has been there a while and gets used to having her brother
to play with don't you think?)

Phil P.
November 12th 05, 12:46 PM
"Larry" > wrote in message
...
> My Sammy has a grade III/VI heart murmur. He then had an
electrocardiogram.
> That is just an ultrasound with a special machine.

Ultrasounds are completely different from an EKG and requires a completely
different machine- they're not interchangeable. Ultrasounds image the heart
with sound waves; EKG works on electrical voltage in the heart. U/S gives
you a pictorial view of the heart structure and functions whereas EKG gives
you a graph.

Ultrasounds and EKG are used for different purposes. One complements the
other but can't replace each other.



The machine can measure
> many things like size of heart and the thickness of the heart wall.


EKG can't differentiate different forms of cardiomyopathy or distinguish
cardiomyopathy from hyperthyroidism, nor can it track blood flow.



An
> x-ray might show something but an ultrasound would be better.


Absolutely.

Glitter Ninja
November 13th 05, 11:28 AM
Juls > writes:
> Karen > wrote:

>> If you are really worried about it, you would want an ultrasound. When
>> is her appt?

>Wednesday. I guess I'm worried that my vet will listen to her heart and
>say she's fine...and then what. I just want what's best for Jas.

Definitely get a 2nd opinion if the vet says your kitty is just fine.
In heart matters you don't want to be guessing.
I recently had a kitty diagnosed with heart murmurs and
cardiomyopathy. They did an ultrasound to confirm the diagnosis. I
don't remember what kind of cardiomyopathy they called it, but it's the
kind where the heart muscles get thicker and the heart works harder.
Right now he's on Atenolol and goes in for a checkup on Tuesday to see
if the dosage is right. The pills are tiny so it's easy to get him to
take the meds.
Good luck with Jas!

Stacia

November 14th 05, 08:23 PM
On Sat, 12 Nov 2005 07:46:31 -0500, "Phil P." >
wrote:

>
>"Larry" > wrote in message
...
>> My Sammy has a grade III/VI heart murmur. He then had an
>electrocardiogram.
>> That is just an ultrasound with a special machine.
>
>Ultrasounds are completely different from an EKG and requires a completely
>different machine- they're not interchangeable. Ultrasounds image the heart
>with sound waves; EKG works on electrical voltage in the heart. U/S gives
>you a pictorial view of the heart structure and functions whereas EKG gives
>you a graph.
>
>Ultrasounds and EKG are used for different purposes. One complements the
>other but can't replace each other.
>
>
>
>The machine can measure
>> many things like size of heart and the thickness of the heart wall.
>
>
>EKG can't differentiate different forms of cardiomyopathy or distinguish
>cardiomyopathy from hyperthyroidism, nor can it track blood flow.
>
>
>
>An
>> x-ray might show something but an ultrasound would be better.
>
>
>Absolutely.
>
>
>
>
Oops, I misspoke in an earlier thread on this. And I should know
better, having had both for my own heart! Thanks for the
clarification, Phil.

Ginger-lyn

Home Pages:
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Animals in Movies Website)

Phil P.
November 15th 05, 07:31 PM
> wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 12 Nov 2005 07:46:31 -0500, "Phil P." >
> wrote:
>
> >
> >"Larry" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> My Sammy has a grade III/VI heart murmur. He then had an
> >electrocardiogram.
> >> That is just an ultrasound with a special machine.
> >
> >Ultrasounds are completely different from an EKG and requires a
completely
> >different machine- they're not interchangeable. Ultrasounds image the
heart
> >with sound waves; EKG works on electrical voltage in the heart. U/S
gives
> >you a pictorial view of the heart structure and functions whereas EKG
gives
> >you a graph.
> >
> >Ultrasounds and EKG are used for different purposes. One complements the
> >other but can't replace each other.
> >
> >
> >
> >The machine can measure
> >> many things like size of heart and the thickness of the heart wall.
> >
> >
> >EKG can't differentiate different forms of cardiomyopathy or distinguish
> >cardiomyopathy from hyperthyroidism, nor can it track blood flow.
> >
> >
> >
> >An
> >> x-ray might show something but an ultrasound would be better.
> >
> >
> >Absolutely.
> >
> >
> >
> >
> Oops, I misspoke in an earlier thread on this. And I should know
> better, having had both for my own heart! Thanks for the
> clarification, Phil.
>
> Ginger-lyn


It certainly does get a little confusing, Ginger,- especially with all the
abbreviations. Many people think ECG stands for "echocardiogram" (which
makes perfect sense) but EKG and ECG are actually the same thing- they both
stand for "electrocardiogram'. EKG is the Dutch/German version of the term
(elektrokardiogram) since that's who (Einthoven) invented it in 1901. EKG
just stuck. Ultasounds are usually called 'echoes" or "sonograms" or
"ultrasounds".

Phil.



>
> Home Pages:
> http://www.spiritrealm.com/summer/
> http://www.angelfire.com/folk/glsummer (homepage & cats)
> http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~summer/index.htm (genealogy)
> http://www.movieanimals.bravehost.com/ (The Violence Against
> Animals in Movies Website)