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MaryLyon
November 12th 05, 08:19 PM
Greetings:

I was recently married, and we have joined households - two cats each.
My two cats like my husband very much, and the feeling is mutual. His
little female is skittish but warming up to me. The problem is his male
- aged two years, neutered. This cat has a history of minor aggressive
behavior (swatting) with just about everyone except my husband, whom he
worships. He is a real one-man cat, and absolutely adores his daddy. He
pretty much ignored me or swatted at me occasionally before we were
married, but once he crawled up on my chest and purred and loved on me
(my husband was sitting right next to me).

Now this cat has decided he hates my guts. He intentionally corners me
and stalks me, meowing and waving his tail. He has actually attacked me
with his claws, drawing quite a bit of blood, on several occasions. It
has gotten to the point where I can't go out on the porch (where he
lives) without a broom for protection (which I wave menacingly at him
when he starts up with the aggressive stance, I would never hit him or
anything). Today I thought maybe I'd sit on the porch and invite him to
sit on the chair with me while I read. He was up and down on the chair,
seemingly nice, then bit me on the back of the hand totally unprovoked
(I wasn't even petting him, just sitting still). He grabbed the thin
skin of my hand and twisted it, leaving a ring of teeth marks and one
deep puncture.

I love all animals and want to be friends with him, but it seems he is
hugely jealous of me and wants me gone. I feed him, clean his litter
pan, talk nicely to him, but nothing works. I hate carrying a broom
around - I want us all to get along - but I have to protect myself -
this is getting dangerous. And what happens when we have a baby?

Any suggestions as to how I can get this fellow to see that I want
nothing more than to love him and pet him would be greatly appreciated.
I have no idea what to do, I've never had an animal not love me - ever!

Thanks!

Best, Amy :)

No More Retail
November 12th 05, 09:06 PM
Got a water bottle or squirt gun when he gets aggressive give him a good
blast of water. Cats hate surprises you want to get his attention can of
compressed air good blast of cold air stops a cat in their tracks. This
sounds bad but he is considering you a invader and is jealous. Carrying the
broom around is inviting trouble with him it makes him feel as if you are on
the attack. Where is husband when he does this if he is around grab him and
make him deal with it since he is daddy. You have to deal with the behavior
as it happens just like a child
http://www.fanciers.com/cat-faqs/behavior.shtml

Make sure you are the only one feeding him give him treats or anything
special. I am assuming there is no medical problems with him. If this
does not work you may have to go to a animal behaviorist to deal with the
aggression it almost sounds like Daddy spoiled the brat let him get away
with anything now step mom has to deal with a brat.

Second that what would happen with a baby nonsense take it and throw it out
the door that is nonsense new mothers come up with any idea they can to get
rid of a cat when they have a child

November 12th 05, 09:37 PM
No More Retail wrote:
>Got a water bottle or squirt gun when he
>gets aggressive give him a good blast of
>water. Cats hate surprises you want to get
>his attention can of compressed air good
>blast of cold air stops a cat in their tracks. *

Please don't give advice unless you actually know wtf you're talking
about. The action involved in blasting this poor cat with water or air
is an *aggressive* move on the human's part and does absolutely NOTHING
to promote a good relationship. Aggression met with aggression results
in more of the same.

>This sounds bad but he is considering
>you a invader and is jealous. Carrying the
>broom around is inviting trouble with him
>it makes him feel as if you are on the
>attack.

Which is exactly what blasting an aggressive, frightened cat with
water/air will do.

To the OP:

It sounds like you are trying very hard to work this out. The move
coupled with the addition of more cats has put a lot of stress on this
poor kitty. At this point, especially since the cat is exhibiting an
extreme reaction and has become a danger to you, your best option would
be to talk to your vetabout drug therapy. This doesn't by any means have
to be permanent, and is mostly used as a tool to re-shape the behavior
of the cat.

From my experience, I would recommend Clomicalm, which is an excellent
medication used specifically to treat aggression and anxiety. I have
seen it work wonders with a cat that *was* very cat aggressive, and
extremely resistant to the standard methods for successful introductions
and developing good relationships. He is now peacefully living with his
former "victim" and the vicious attacks are no more.

The standard way to use such a medication is to start the cat on it and
wait until the drug has reached it's full effect, which can take several
weeks with this type of medication. In that time you should see the
aggressive behavior diminish or even disappear. Make sure to keep an eye
on the amount the cat gets so only the behavior stops and the cat isn't
in a constant state of sedation. You then keep the animal on the
medication for at least a few months while creating a new routine of
interaction and behavior.

Once the cat has been consistent in his actions and reactions for quite
a period of time (in effect retrained) you can then S-L-O-W-L-Y start
weaning him off the meds, cutting back a small amount each week. In most
cases cats can be completely taken off the drug at some point, but there
are those cats that may need to remain on the medication for the long
term. The cat I'm working with right now has been on Clomicalm for
several months and is now on about 1/2 of his initial dose and is doing
quite well, so I expect that down the road his guardian may very well be
able to take him off of it completely.

Megan



Megan



"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing."

-Edmund Burke

Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com

Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision,
raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and
material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his
way."

- W.H. Murray

November 12th 05, 09:54 PM
I gave you a detailed answer in another reply I wrote, but I wanted to
address this specifically:

>It has gotten to the point where I can't go
>out on the porch (where he lives) without
>a broom for protection (which I wave
>menacingly at him when he starts up with
>the aggressive stance, I would never hit
>him or anything).

But he doesn't know that. When you wave the broom at him "menacingly"
you them (to him) immediately become a threat. Maybe a better option
would be to keep a large pillow handy that you can grab and simply put
between you if he comes after you. I know it's hard, but try to keep in
mind that this cat truly has nothing against you personally, and is
reacting to circumstances. Try to be genle and positive with him at all
times, regardless of his behavior.

>Today I thought maybe I'd sit on the
>porch and invite him to sit on the chair
>with me while I read. He was up and
>down on the chair, seemingly nice, then
>bit me on the back of the hand totally
>unprovoked (I wasn't even petting him,
>just sitting still). He grabbed the thin skin
>of my hand and twisted it, leaving a ring
>of teeth marks and one deep puncture.

Well, the good news is that you did indeed have a bit of positive
interactiion with this cat, so there IS hope! As I stated in my other
reply, this cat is obviously stressed and you are seeing behavior
typical of this. You say he lives on the porch? Was this because of his
aggression? I realize it is a safety issue, but if he is isolated on the
porch, this is just exacerbating the problem. He has now lost his home,
his relationship with his human, and has to concede territory to two
other cats. Can you give a little more detail about exactly what his
previous living situation was and what changes happened?

Megan



"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing."

-Edmund Burke

Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com

Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision,
raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and
material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his
way."

- W.H. Murray

No More Retail
November 12th 05, 10:19 PM
Sorry you disagree Megan but that seems to happen alot when it comes to you
and me.
You get an aggressive cat advancing on you that has caused damage before to
you. A blast of water or compressed air stops them from attacking or would
you rather have them broom used to stop the cat. A blast of water of the
use of the air is a defensive move that to be used when the cat is
aggressively advancing as she described not an attack.

"Since cats hate to be surprised, you can use waterbottles, clapping,
hissing, and other sudden noises to stop unwanted behavior"
http://www.fanciers.com/cat-faqs/behavior.shtml but I guess they have it
wrong and they are experts.

Second a drug therapy should be a last resort, considering cats tend to be
more sensitive to tricyclic antidepressant drugs An animal behaviorist
would be the way to go since he has exhibited aggression in the past before


And You may not like it Megan but there are others that know WTF is going
on. You are not the only one with experice with cats neither of us are
experts we are both going by experiences

No More Retail
November 12th 05, 10:21 PM
What type of containers is he chewing thru Diane? I got a couple of passive
ways to stop them from doing it

No More Retail
November 12th 05, 10:40 PM
I have a cat that does this he loves cheetos. When we get a bag we store it
in a large stand up Tupperware container. Well if we don't put it a locked
cabinet by next morning you can guess what happens.

We do 2 things to keep the cats out of the cabinets beside adding child
proof locks on them. I take eupltiptus ( no sure if that is spelled right )
leaves dried and put them in the cupboard or use it in a oil from the leaves
spray it on the inside cabinet door cabinet doors it dries clear . They try
to pull the door open or stick there nose in it they hate the smell. plus
it keeps bugs and fleas out of the kitchen

They leaves can make the cat sick if they are well not intelligent enough
to eat something that does not smell good. I use a small wood match stick
box with holes in it.

If the cat get used to the smell I use Tabasco oil as a spray. I hate to
have to use the cat repellent spray that you can get at the pet store. I
use it in on place in the house my workshop to many dangerous tools and
areas for a cat.

No More Retail
November 12th 05, 10:50 PM
But you have to be careful that they never do get a chance to eat it the
plant is poisonous to them but they can't stand the smell so they should not
even try

November 12th 05, 10:58 PM
No More Retail wrote:
> Sorry you disagree Megan but that seems
> to happen alot when it comes to you and
> me.

Gee, I wonder why...

> You get an aggressive cat advancing on
> you that has caused damage before to
> you. A blast of water or compressed air
> stops them from attacking or would you
> rather have them broom used to stop the
> cat.

Common sense would dictate you get out of the way/remove yourself from
the situation or don't put yourself in it in the first place since you
already are aware of the cat's aggressive behavior.

>A blast of water of the use of the
> air is a defensive move that to be used
> when the cat is aggressively advancing
> as she described not an attack.

If the ct is only "dvancing" there is no need to defend oneself and the
OP can leave the room.
And acting defensively in the form of blasting/squirting/ waving a broom
will increase the likelihood of an aggressive response. I already
described how simply using a large pillow and blocking an attack is more
effective than blasting/squirting or coming at the cat with a broom is.
Aggression is met with aggression and there is absolutely NO NEED in
this situation to provoke this cat and stress it out more.

> "Since cats hate to be surprised, you
> can use waterbottles, clapping, hissing,
> and other sudden noises to stop unwanted
> behavior"
> http://www.fanciers.com/cat-faqs/behavio
> r.shtml but I guess they have it wrong
> and they are experts.

You realize that was written in 1991 and only updated through '97, no? A
lot of progress has been made in the field of cat behavior and, besides,
this does not address aggression. The quote you provide concerns
annoying (unwanted) behaviors, not responding to aggression, which is
entirely different. And the idea of squirt bottles as an effective
behavior modification tool is archaeic and ineffective:

http://www.littlebigcat.com/index.php?action=library&act=show&item=squirtbottlespunishmentandcatbehavior1

> Second a drug therapy should be a last
> resort, considering cats tend to be more
> sensitive to tricyclic antidepressant
> drugs

And you have a cite for this claim, yes?

>An animal behaviorist would be the
> way to go since he has exhibited
> aggression in the past before

And I guarantee you that the first thin the behaviorist will do,
consideing the fact that this cat is a DANGER, is to put it on
meiaction. Since the OP is in physical danger most of the time, it is
the time of last resort. You also conveniently ignored the part where I
said this is generally a temporary tool used as part of behavior
modification and in most cases the cat can be weaned off the drug. I
don't recommend drug therapy at the drop of a hat and reserve suggesting
it for specific cases where there aren't really other effective options.
This is one of them, and AFAIC if a few months of drug therapy can have
a good chance in resulting in a lifetime of happiness for cat and
guardian I'm all for it.

> **And You may not like it Megan but
> there are others that know WTF is going
> on.

In this situation, you are not one of them. Your "advice" will only
serve to further damage an already stressed and tenous relationship.

Megan



"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing."

-Edmund Burke

Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com

Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision,
raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and
material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his
way."

- W.H. Murray

No More Retail
November 12th 05, 11:40 PM
Megan You win
I am not arguing any more with you
You gave the right answer! The only correct answer that there can be!
I will leave it as that
No sense arguing with you. You are always going to be right.

CatNipped
November 13th 05, 12:13 AM
NO, no, no, no, no! She shouldn't do *anything* else more aggressive to the
cat - this will only make the situation worse! Even waving the broom
menacingly is an unconstructive (but understandable) behavior.

It is going to take a *lot* of positive reinforcement to change this
fellow's mind about you. First, take a step back and don't try to force the
issue.

Next, find out what the cat's favorite thing in the world is (besides your
husband). Then have your husband start providing the "treat" whenever you
are in the room with the cat (the trick is to get him to associate good
things with you. *Slowly* work up to being able to provide the treat
yourself - always working at the cat's pace, not yours.

This is a serious issue with lots of variables (living arrangements, other
cats, etc.) and I'm about to run out to supper just now. If you'd like some
behavior modification instructions you can email me (my addy is not munged).

In the meantime be sure to see a doctor about that bite - the only bite more
likely to become infected is a bite from a human. How long has it been
since you had your last tetanus shot?

Hugs,

CatNipped


"No More Retail" > wrote in message
...
> Got a water bottle or squirt gun when he gets aggressive give him a good
> blast of water. Cats hate surprises you want to get his attention can of
> compressed air good blast of cold air stops a cat in their tracks. This
> sounds bad but he is considering you a invader and is jealous. Carrying
the
> broom around is inviting trouble with him it makes him feel as if you are
on
> the attack. Where is husband when he does this if he is around grab him
and
> make him deal with it since he is daddy. You have to deal with the
behavior
> as it happens just like a child
> http://www.fanciers.com/cat-faqs/behavior.shtml
>
> Make sure you are the only one feeding him give him treats or anything
> special. I am assuming there is no medical problems with him. If this
> does not work you may have to go to a animal behaviorist to deal with the
> aggression it almost sounds like Daddy spoiled the brat let him get away
> with anything now step mom has to deal with a brat.
>
> Second that what would happen with a baby nonsense take it and throw it
out
> the door that is nonsense new mothers come up with any idea they can to
get
> rid of a cat when they have a child
>
>

cybercat
November 13th 05, 12:27 AM
"Diane" > wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> wrote:
>
> > If the ct is only "dvancing" there is no need to defend oneself and the
> > OP can leave the room.
>
> Every time Hodge advanced, if I turned around to leave he invariably
> bit. (If I stood ground, he'd sometimes stop. If I backed out, he took
> movement as aggression, even backward movement.
>
> > And acting defensively in the form of blasting/squirting/ waving a broom
> > will increase the likelihood of an aggressive response. I already
> > described how simply using a large pillow and blocking an attack is more
> > effective than blasting/squirting or coming at the cat with a broom is.
>
> I used to use a dishtowel, which was effective and was soon dubbed the
> "Dishtowel of Terror."
>
> The circumstances are, of course, completely different because my
> aggressive cat is not confined to one area, so I had to be on the
> lookout all the time for signs of a mood/attack. Talk about stress . . .
> and I don't mean just the cat.
> --

Jeeze, Diane. You ARE in love. Well, he is a handsome boy. :)
I don't suppose you ever tried medicating him? (I am not advocating it,
just wondering. I am musing over what I might to if I found myself
with an Attack Cat.

5cats
November 13th 05, 12:34 AM
No More Retail wrote:

> Second that what would happen with a baby nonsense take it and throw
> it out the door that is nonsense new mothers come up with any idea
> they can to get rid of a cat when they have a child

Did you read the same thing I did? This woman is not just coming "up with
any idea they can to get rid of a cat" I don't see what she said to deserve
that shot.

Temporary use of drugs seems well justified in this case, I certainly can't
come up with any better ideas.

Cheryl
November 13th 05, 12:44 AM
On Sat 12 Nov 2005 02:19:08p, MaryLyon wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
roups.com):

[...]
> Any suggestions as to how I can get this fellow to see that I
> want nothing more than to love him and pet him would be greatly
> appreciated. I have no idea what to do, I've never had an animal
> not love me - ever!

Assuming that you've done proper introductions with all of the
cats, I'd have to second what Megan has written, though I'd have
never thought about a pillow between me and the aggressive one;
that's pretty new! ;) I have an aggressive cat who is currently on
Clomicalm. He used to attack me, and during his most aggressive
moments, he wouldn't let me leave a room. I dreaded summer and
wearing shorts. My legs are permanently scarred. This particular
cat also has severe allergy problems, so his aggression is probably
because he gets very itchy and grumpy. A suggestion from Megan to
me years ago was to carry a laser pointer with me all the time - it
worked. Whenever the aggressive one came at my legs, I'd shine the
dot away from me, and sure enough he'd go after it and I could make
an escape. I really resisted drug therapy, but it really was a last
resort. He started Clomicalm last March, and after a dermatologist
visit in May, he's also on allergy shots. He still has his moments
with one of my other cats, but he hasn't attacked me since being on
the drugs. He really doesn't act sedated any more - he did at
first, but it took a little work to find the right dosage.

Good luck and I sure know how scary it can be to have those claws
coming at you all the time. It's also sad because it's so obvious
something is bothering them.

--
Cheryl

No More Retail
November 13th 05, 12:54 AM
That was not a shot at her
A mistake in word on my behalf
New mothers that don't want their cats come up with any reason to get rid
of them. Sorry my mistake on that behalf I apologize for that. The could
happen to the baby nonsense is what should be throw out the door

cybercat
November 13th 05, 02:16 AM
"Diane" > wrote

> > I don't suppose you ever tried medicating him? (I am not advocating it,
> > just wondering. I am musing over what I might to if I found myself
> > with an Attack Cat.
>
> I did, although off the top of my head I don't remember the name of the
> drug. The funny thing was -- the only effect it had was to make him
> attack in slow motion. :)

:)

>
> He is much better now. He was in a mood today, but mostly he's calmer.
> But I do have quite a collection of scars from when I first got him. I'd
> never dealt with an aggressive cat before. I think he has dominant dog
> syndrome.
>
> I'd rather have a sweet cat like my old Pudge, honestly, but it wasn't
> to be.

It is amazing the way they can steal your heart, warts and all.

cybercat
November 13th 05, 02:30 AM
> wrote in message
...
No More Retail wrote:
> Sorry you disagree Megan but that seems
> to happen alot when it comes to you and
> me.

Gee, I wonder why...

Really. It's not like Megan ever has conflicts with anyone.

lol

cybercat
November 13th 05, 02:32 AM
"Diane" > wrote in message
...
> In article >, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
> > It is amazing the way they can steal your heart, warts and all.
>
> Are you saying my heart has warts, hmmm? ;)
> --

Hahaha! It does look like I was saying that, doesn't it? Well,
I guess the truth is most of our hearts do. Warts, bumps, bruises
scars and great big soft spots for Big Orange Boys!

cybercat
November 13th 05, 02:39 AM
"Cheryl" > wrote in message
...
> On Sat 12 Nov 2005 08:30:30p, cybercat wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.health+behav ):
>
> >
> > > wrote in message
> > ...
> > No More Retail wrote:
> >> Sorry you disagree Megan but that seems
> >> to happen alot when it comes to you and
> >> me.
> >
> > Gee, I wonder why...
> >
> > Really. It's not like Megan ever has conflicts with anyone.
> >
> > lol
> >
> >
> >
>
> And as you do, and Phil does, and as I do, and as practically
> everyone in this group does. Singling out Megan means absolutely
> nothing.

My point was, it is not necessarily because NMR is wrong, which is what
Megan is suggesting.


>Try again whacko woman.
>

Try what, drama queen?

MaryLyon
November 13th 05, 02:46 AM
Greetings:

Thanks for your advice. Please don't misunderstand my comment about
having a baby, there is no way that I would EVER get rid of a pet - I
am a firm believer in the concept that pets are a lifetime commitment,
and have lived with several animals in my life who would probably have
been euthanized or given away by others. I just meant that if this guy
is being this aggressive with me, what will his behavior be like when
there is a NEW intruder, especially one who makes a lot of noise?

I've considered the squirtgun option. It never occurred to me to
consider medication, but it's an interesting idea. I'm more interested
in trying every behavioral option before we even think about meds - I
am sure there is a way this guy and I can have a rapproachement.

I have to say, though, that the whole thing really hurts my feelings,
since I am an animal lover from way back (esp. cats!), and have never,
ever been unable to make friends with a pet. I agree that this fellow
has been through a lot of changes and stress (new family, new cats,
plus we are hurricane evacuees, so we are in a new home, as well). I
would like to blame his behavior on situational difficulties, but he
wasn't crazy about me before all the changes, and I've been told he has
swatted and attacked other people before me. With his dad, though, he
is an angel - I know he can be a sweet boy, and I'm looking forward to
being, if not friends, at least mutually respectful. He's an awfully
pretty fellow, and that one time he climbed up on my chest and slept
was so sweet!

Thanks again for your advice. I am hopeful that we can work through
this!

Best, Amy :)

MaryLyon
November 13th 05, 03:05 AM
Greetings:

We are hurricane evacuees, and are staying in a rented condo until we
can get home to New Orleans. We have slowly been introducing the cats
to each other, and thought that it would work well to have them be able
to look at each other through the glass for a while. We let them mix
several times a week, but it does not usually go well, my cats are not
friendly to their new brother and sister. Husband's cats approach my
cats with playful body language, but mine hiss and swat (they are
older, and I imagine they are not interested in these young
whippersnappers). The attacking guy and my older and gentle (10 y/o)
tuxedo have gotten in a few scrapes over the past couple of months. I
can't imagine having all four inside this very small condo, the
fighting and chaos would be very stressful to all concerned (not to
mention that the people who rented it to us think we only have 2
cats!!!)

The cats don't seem to mind being on the porch, usually. They like to
look at birds and sniff the air (there was no porch for them in their
old house, they were strictly indoor cats). The attacking guy does pine
for his dad, and he can get very upset when he sees him and can't come
in. My husband spends as much time on the porch with him as possible,
but he recently had surgery and was in spectacular pain for a couple of
months, so he was not able to go out as much as he would have liked.

I think this fellow sees his dad and me interacting together inside and
is jealous. That's why I have made such an effort to be the one who
gives him treats, cleans his litter pan, etc. I recognize that this cat
has been through a lot of stress (as have we all!!), and is probably
mad that he can't come in the house. Still, I must emphasize that this
cat had a strong history of aggressive behavior way before the
hurricane, marriage, relocation, etc.

Meanwhile, the hand he bit today is way swollen, and sore as hell. I'm
going to ice it right now.

Don't worry, I told Attack Guy that I forgive him and love him anyway!
(He just glared at me...) Actually, I think things might get better
once we go home and are all living together in the big house, with
plenty of room (we are fortunate in that my husband's home was
undamaged by the storm, a real miracle!!!)

Best, Amy :)

CatNipped
November 13th 05, 04:21 AM
"MaryLyon" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Greetings:
>
> We are hurricane evacuees, and are staying in a rented condo until we
> can get home to New Orleans. We have slowly been introducing the cats
> to each other, and thought that it would work well to have them be able
> to look at each other through the glass for a while. We let them mix
> several times a week, but it does not usually go well, my cats are not
> friendly to their new brother and sister. Husband's cats approach my
> cats with playful body language, but mine hiss and swat (they are
> older, and I imagine they are not interested in these young
> whippersnappers). The attacking guy and my older and gentle (10 y/o)
> tuxedo have gotten in a few scrapes over the past couple of months. I
> can't imagine having all four inside this very small condo, the
> fighting and chaos would be very stressful to all concerned (not to
> mention that the people who rented it to us think we only have 2
> cats!!!)
>
> The cats don't seem to mind being on the porch, usually. They like to
> look at birds and sniff the air (there was no porch for them in their
> old house, they were strictly indoor cats). The attacking guy does pine
> for his dad, and he can get very upset when he sees him and can't come
> in. My husband spends as much time on the porch with him as possible,
> but he recently had surgery and was in spectacular pain for a couple of
> months, so he was not able to go out as much as he would have liked.
>
> I think this fellow sees his dad and me interacting together inside and
> is jealous. That's why I have made such an effort to be the one who
> gives him treats, cleans his litter pan, etc. I recognize that this cat
> has been through a lot of stress (as have we all!!), and is probably
> mad that he can't come in the house. Still, I must emphasize that this
> cat had a strong history of aggressive behavior way before the
> hurricane, marriage, relocation, etc.
>
> Meanwhile, the hand he bit today is way swollen, and sore as hell. I'm
> going to ice it right now.
>
> Don't worry, I told Attack Guy that I forgive him and love him anyway!
> (He just glared at me...) Actually, I think things might get better
> once we go home and are all living together in the big house, with
> plenty of room (we are fortunate in that my husband's home was
> undamaged by the storm, a real miracle!!!)
>
> Best, Amy :)

Amy, again, I *strongly* advise you to see a doctor about your hand. Cat
bites are nothing to fool around with - you could lose the use of your hand
if infection gets into the nerves. I know, I have a biter (earlier this
year she was stressed at the vet's and she bit me down into the first joint
of my middle finger). I was on Clavamox for 10 days and had to get a
tetanus shot (which I'm allergic to so my arm was swollen and itched for 3
weeks!!!).

About your Attack Guy, have you tried Feliway difusers or spray yet? Some
people find them very helpful (but I did hear one person say that they made
their cat even more stressed because the cat thought there was an invisible
cat in the house! ;>).

As I said before, at this point I would back off a bit if I were you,
encourage your husband to spend as much time with his cat as he can. I know
you're anxious to make friends and become one big happy family, but if you
push it you can make the situation worse than it is.

Megan's suggestion about medication is a good one - I know you'd like to
rely on behavioral modification alone, but sometimes you just need to get a
handle on the situation before you can even start to change it. It's going
to take a lot of time and effort, but the day that he sits on your lap and
purrs will make it all worth it.

I do know what you're going through - my entire family lived in St. Bernard
Parish (mostly around Chalmette). My mother-in-law, sister-in-law,
daughter, son-in-law, and my three granddaughters moved in with us after
Katrina. My husband and I were the *only* members of our family who did not
live in "ground zero" (we're in Houston). Other than those living with me,
my whole family is living in FEMA trailers or leasing furnished homes.

Hugs,

CatNipped

IBen Getiner
November 13th 05, 07:17 AM
MaryLyon wrote:
> Greetings:
>
> I was recently married, and we have joined households - two cats each.
> My two cats like my husband very much, and the feeling is mutual. His
> little female is skittish but warming up to me. The problem is his male
> - aged two years, neutered. This cat has a history of minor aggressive
> behavior (swatting) with just about everyone except my husband, whom he
> worships. He is a real one-man cat, and absolutely adores his daddy. He
> pretty much ignored me or swatted at me occasionally before we were
> married, but once he crawled up on my chest and purred and loved on me
> (my husband was sitting right next to me).
>
> Now this cat has decided he hates my guts. He intentionally corners me
> and stalks me, meowing and waving his tail. He has actually attacked me
> with his claws, drawing quite a bit of blood, on several occasions. It
> has gotten to the point where I can't go out on the porch (where he
> lives) without a broom for protection (which I wave menacingly at him
> when he starts up with the aggressive stance, I would never hit him or
> anything). Today I thought maybe I'd sit on the porch and invite him to
> sit on the chair with me while I read. He was up and down on the chair,
> seemingly nice, then bit me on the back of the hand totally unprovoked
> (I wasn't even petting him, just sitting still). He grabbed the thin
> skin of my hand and twisted it, leaving a ring of teeth marks and one
> deep puncture.
>
> I love all animals and want to be friends with him, but it seems he is
> hugely jealous of me and wants me gone. I feed him, clean his litter
> pan, talk nicely to him, but nothing works. I hate carrying a broom
> around - I want us all to get along - but I have to protect myself -
> this is getting dangerous. And what happens when we have a baby?
>
> Any suggestions as to how I can get this fellow to see that I want
> nothing more than to love him and pet him would be greatly appreciated.
> I have no idea what to do, I've never had an animal not love me - ever!
>
> Thanks!
>
> Best, Amy :)


Respond in kind. The cat hates you. That's all there is to it. And
that's never going to change. The only course of action available to
you now is to show it who is the boss. Make IT fear YOU. Not the other
way around.
These are common sense things. What is it with you and your generation?
You seem to have none.



IBen

November 13th 05, 10:30 AM
I'll probably get flamed, but I really wouldn't advise drugging the
cat. Look at the situation - the cat is a hurricane evacuee, he's
living in a new territory, he's simultaneously being introduced to two
strange cats, and his human, the one thing he can depend on, is all
involved with this new strange human. He's angry and he's got a right
to be, even if he's showing it in such a difficult way. He needs time
to adjust. Your husband is his person, right? I think it may be your
husband who has the ability here to have a calming effect on the cat by
spending some solitary time with kitty everyday, reassuring him that
he's still his extra special kitty and rebuilding that bond after all
the changes. That's what kitty wants - he doesn't want you as an (to
his mind) inferior substitute. If your husband could devote himself to
doing a little extra-bonding - with you more or less ignoring the cat
for a while, then you may get a little more space to operate in. Once
the rebonding is in full swing, try to have your husband be the one to
discourage the negative behavior and reward any positive behavior. Try
encountering the cat together, treats in hand, and if the cat is
non-aggressive with you - have your husband reward him with treats
right away. If the cat is aggressive with you - have your husband
express displeasure, and stop interacting with the cat. You both must
be consistent about this and try it everyday. You must incentivize the
cat, using his bond with your husband, to see that he will get what he
wants, affection from your husband, if he is polite to you and the
other cats, and if he isn't, then he won't.

Charlie Wilkes
November 13th 05, 11:42 AM
On Sat, 12 Nov 2005 14:54:14 -0600, wrote:


>But he doesn't know that. When you wave the broom at him "menacingly"
>you them (to him) immediately become a threat. Maybe a better option
>would be to keep a large pillow handy that you can grab and simply put
>between you if he comes after you. I know it's hard, but try to keep in
>mind that this cat truly has nothing against you personally, and is
>reacting to circumstances.
>
Yes. This is consistent with what I have read about animal behavior.

Aversives are bad for canine aggression, at least in all of the most
common situations. The aversive reinforces the aggressive impulse by
raising the animal's anxiety level, which is what causes the
aggression to start with.

For example, if a dog guards a bed, the common mistake is to challenge
him. That might scare the dog off the bed, but it tells him he is
correctly reading the situation as a threat.

The accepted technique is to gradually get closer and work the trigger
threshold down by praising the dog for his tolerance and stopping
before he becomes aggressive. It takes patience, but it isn't
complicated and it usually works.

But cats are too unpredictable in what sets them off, so anti-anxiety
drugs are used to achieve the same effect.

Charlie

Linda Terrell
November 13th 05, 03:51 PM
In article . com>,
"MaryLyon" > wrote:

> Any suggestions as to how I can get this fellow to see that I want
> nothing more than to love him and pet him would be greatly appreciated.
> I have no idea what to do, I've never had an animal not love me - ever!
>
> Thanks!
>
> Best, Amy :)

Water Pistol

LT

cybercat
November 13th 05, 04:46 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> I'll probably get flamed, but I really wouldn't advise drugging the
> cat. Look at the situation - the cat is a hurricane evacuee, he's
> living in a new territory, he's simultaneously being introduced to two
> strange cats, and his human, the one thing he can depend on, is all
> involved with this new strange human. He's angry and he's got a right
> to be, even if he's showing it in such a difficult way. He needs time
> to adjust. Your husband is his person, right? I think it may be your
> husband who has the ability here to have a calming effect on the cat by
> spending some solitary time with kitty everyday, reassuring him that
> he's still his extra special kitty and rebuilding that bond after all
> the changes. That's what kitty wants - he doesn't want you as an (to
> his mind) inferior substitute. If your husband could devote himself to
> doing a little extra-bonding - with you more or less ignoring the cat
> for a while, then you may get a little more space to operate in. Once
> the rebonding is in full swing, try to have your husband be the one to
> discourage the negative behavior and reward any positive behavior. Try
> encountering the cat together, treats in hand, and if the cat is
> non-aggressive with you - have your husband reward him with treats
> right away. If the cat is aggressive with you - have your husband
> express displeasure, and stop interacting with the cat. You both must
> be consistent about this and try it everyday. You must incentivize the
> cat, using his bond with your husband, to see that he will get what he
> wants, affection from your husband, if he is polite to you and the
> other cats, and if he isn't, then he won't.
>

I think this is really good advice, Tracy, and hope the OP will at
least try it before resorting to drugs. It would be nice for her not
to have to pill the cat every day, among other considerations. You
seem to have a nice way of thinking like a cat.

MaryLyon
November 13th 05, 04:54 PM
Greetings:

Wow, what a funny response, given you have no idea of my age, so
therefore have no idea what "generation" I belong to. I understand you
are just a troll, but I do appreciate the laugh, thanks!

Best, Amy :)

MaryLyon
November 13th 05, 04:59 PM
Greetings,

Thanks for your advice and kind words. I was very sorry to hear about
your family - I know that Chalmette was decimated by Katrina. I hope
everyone is safe and healthy.

We are very eager to get back and see what we are up against with our
own eyes. Though this condo has been a real blessing, we feel very
disconnected from our beloved city, and we do not like getting our
information second and third hand. I am so glad we were able to leave
with our pets and have a place to go - I know that you all know that
many people had to leave their pets, or refused to leave because they
would not do it. I hope that in the future, there is better planning
for people to be able to bring their animals with them. I'm glad that
I'm just dealing with an aggressive guy, as opposed to not knowing
where he is or if he is safe!

Best, Amy :)

cybercat
November 13th 05, 06:30 PM
"MaryLyon" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Greetings:
>
> Wow, what a funny response, given you have no idea of my age, so
> therefore have no idea what "generation" I belong to. I understand you
> are just a troll, but I do appreciate the laugh, thanks!
>
> Best, Amy :)
>

You do realize that nobody has any idea of who you are responding to,
right?

MaryLyon
November 13th 05, 06:43 PM
Greetings,

No, sorry - I meant the fellow who suggested that "my" generation had
no ability to discipline, or something silly like that! :)

Thanks again for everyone's advice. My husband was able to spend four
straight hours of quality time with Attack Guy this AM, which was great
for both of them!

Best, Amy :)

cybercat
November 13th 05, 07:18 PM
"MaryLyon" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Greetings,
>
> No, sorry - I meant the fellow who suggested that "my" generation had
> no ability to discipline, or something silly like that! :)

Ah, I missed that one. If you include a little snippet of the post to which
you are replying, everyone can tell.

>
> Thanks again for everyone's advice. My husband was able to spend four
> straight hours of quality time with Attack Guy this AM, which was great
> for both of them!
>

Hope it works out, Amy. I really like TracyRose's advice.

CatNipped
November 13th 05, 07:27 PM
"MaryLyon" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Greetings,
>
> Thanks for your advice and kind words. I was very sorry to hear about
> your family - I know that Chalmette was decimated by Katrina. I hope
> everyone is safe and healthy.
>
> We are very eager to get back and see what we are up against with our
> own eyes. Though this condo has been a real blessing, we feel very
> disconnected from our beloved city, and we do not like getting our
> information second and third hand. I am so glad we were able to leave
> with our pets and have a place to go - I know that you all know that
> many people had to leave their pets, or refused to leave because they
> would not do it. I hope that in the future, there is better planning
> for people to be able to bring their animals with them. I'm glad that
> I'm just dealing with an aggressive guy, as opposed to not knowing
> where he is or if he is safe!
>
> Best, Amy :)

Yeah, the most important thing is that everyone was safe and lived through
the storm - but every single family member lost their homes with everything
in them. Here are some pictures of my daughter's home from right after they
were allowed in to the latest clean-up step. They had to first get
everything out of the house to throw away - because of the toxic mold they
couldn't even salvage the things that were *not* under water for 7 to 10
days. They then had to strip off all sheetrock, ceilings, insulation,
wiring (it was salt water so the copper wiring was corroded) - basically had
to strip the house down to just the bricks and studs, even the roof has to
be replaced).

First pictures: (blurred because my daughter was shaking and crying as she
took them) http://www.possibleplaces.com/StBernard/Erin/

First step: http://www.possibleplaces.com/Recovery1/

Latest progress: http://www.possibleplaces.com/Recovery2/

Hugs,

CatNipped

Rebecca Root
November 13th 05, 07:50 PM
On 2005-11-12 12:19:08 -0700, "MaryLyon" > said:
>
> Any suggestions as to how I can get this fellow to see that I want
> nothing more than to love him and pet him would be greatly appreciated.
> I have no idea what to do, I've never had an animal not love me - ever!

I'm not expert, but I'm going to suggest something that is an
extrapolation of advice I got on reintroducing my two cats two each
other after a falling out.

This cat needs to learn that good things happen when he's near you, but
he needs to do it gradually. It sounds like getting attention from your
husband is the thing he likes best, so he should be lavished with that
attention when he is in your presence. Start out with you apart while
kitty gets attention from his dad. Gradually move you closer, closely
watching that kitty stays comfortable. Let kitty get ordinary attention
from dad in between, but save the extra special attention (favorite
treats, games, scratches) for when you are near by. That's so he'll
associate being near you with happy times.

Once he's totally relaxed with you close by, offering participating in
the attention along with your husband, starting with the things that
least frighten the cat and are safest for you. For example. set down
the treat or pull the toy. Save petting until all else seems normal,
and let the cat approach you first.

That's my extrapolation. Here's my own two-cents; also add in talking
to the cat in your "cat-voice" mixed with whatever your husband does.
I've seen cats raised by women being very scared of men, and I think
the voice pitch and quality may have something to do with it. It may
happen in reverse for this cat. His comfort voice is very different
from yours, so he may have to learn it. Women's voices are pitched more
in cat's range, so it may appear more threatening when it is
unfamiliar. Again, this is purely my own conjecture. Good luck with
your cats, your new marriage and putting your life back together.
You've really got a full plate.

cybercat
November 13th 05, 08:17 PM
"Rebecca Root" > wrote in message
news:2005111311500516807%[email protected]
> On 2005-11-12 12:19:08 -0700, "MaryLyon" > said:
> >
> > Any suggestions as to how I can get this fellow to see that I want
> > nothing more than to love him and pet him would be greatly appreciated.
> > I have no idea what to do, I've never had an animal not love me - ever!
>
> I'm not expert, but I'm going to suggest something that is an
> extrapolation of advice I got on reintroducing my two cats two each
> other after a falling out.
>
> This cat needs to learn that good things happen when he's near you, but
> he needs to do it gradually. It sounds like getting attention from your
> husband is the thing he likes best, so he should be lavished with that
> attention when he is in your presence. Start out with you apart while
> kitty gets attention from his dad. Gradually move you closer, closely
> watching that kitty stays comfortable. Let kitty get ordinary attention
> from dad in between, but save the extra special attention (favorite
> treats, games, scratches) for when you are near by. That's so he'll
> associate being near you with happy times.
>
> Once he's totally relaxed with you close by, offering participating in
> the attention along with your husband, starting with the things that
> least frighten the cat and are safest for you. For example. set down
> the treat or pull the toy. Save petting until all else seems normal,
> and let the cat approach you first.
>

Positive reinforcement really works, but it does require patience,
more in some cases than in others. In this case finding some
patience would probably be worth it because the OP, the cat, and the
husband are in it for the long haul.

Charlie Wilkes
November 14th 05, 08:06 AM
On Sun, 13 Nov 2005 10:46:11 -0500, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>> I'll probably get flamed, but I really wouldn't advise drugging the
>> cat. Look at the situation - the cat is a hurricane evacuee, he's
>> living in a new territory, he's simultaneously being introduced to two
>> strange cats, and his human, the one thing he can depend on, is all
>> involved with this new strange human. He's angry and he's got a right
>> to be, even if he's showing it in such a difficult way. He needs time
>> to adjust. Your husband is his person, right? I think it may be your
>> husband who has the ability here to have a calming effect on the cat by
>> spending some solitary time with kitty everyday, reassuring him that
>> he's still his extra special kitty and rebuilding that bond after all
>> the changes. That's what kitty wants - he doesn't want you as an (to
>> his mind) inferior substitute. If your husband could devote himself to
>> doing a little extra-bonding - with you more or less ignoring the cat
>> for a while, then you may get a little more space to operate in. Once
>> the rebonding is in full swing, try to have your husband be the one to
>> discourage the negative behavior and reward any positive behavior. Try
>> encountering the cat together, treats in hand, and if the cat is
>> non-aggressive with you - have your husband reward him with treats
>> right away. If the cat is aggressive with you - have your husband
>> express displeasure, and stop interacting with the cat. You both must
>> be consistent about this and try it everyday. You must incentivize the
>> cat, using his bond with your husband, to see that he will get what he
>> wants, affection from your husband, if he is polite to you and the
>> other cats, and if he isn't, then he won't.
>>
>
>I think this is really good advice, Tracy, and hope the OP will at
>least try it before resorting to drugs. It would be nice for her not
>to have to pill the cat every day, among other considerations. You
>seem to have a nice way of thinking like a cat.
>
I'm not sure the cat is feeling anger per se. He may be experiencing
something more like what we would consider stress, i.e., fear and
anxiety.

If I were in Mary Lyon's situation, I think I would take pains to
avoid that cat and not let it near me. For one thing, she will avoid
getting bitten again if she does this. Also she will avoid triggering
the aggression. Let the cat play the role of suitor if there is to be
a friendship between these two mammals.

Karen Overall is one of the experts in this field and has interesting
comments about feline aggression. Of course, she is also a big drug
proponent and one of the academic sponsors or Clonicalm.

Charlie

-L.
November 14th 05, 08:52 AM
cybercat wrote:
> "MaryLyon" > wrote in message
> ups.com...
> > Greetings,
> >
> > No, sorry - I meant the fellow who suggested that "my" generation had
> > no ability to discipline, or something silly like that! :)
>
> Ah, I missed that one. If you include a little snippet of the post to which
> you are replying, everyone can tell.

If you viewed the conversation threaded like most newsgroup
participants, you wouldn't keep having this problem.

For someone who bellows continually about how people should post
whatever they want and however they like, you sure seem to like to
dictate to others what they should be commenting on and how they should
post. Hypocrite.

-L.

IBen Getiner
November 14th 05, 11:00 AM
MaryLyon wrote:
> Greetings,
>
> No, sorry - I meant the fellow who suggested that "my" generation had
> no ability to discipline, or something silly like that! :)

You're writing style is extremely shallow and immature. That's how I
knew. Especially telling is the fact that you can't handle a problem
like this without resorting to 'group therapy'.



IBen

cybercat
November 14th 05, 01:26 PM
"-L." > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> cybercat wrote:
> > "MaryLyon" > wrote in message
> > ups.com...
> > > Greetings,
> > >
> > > No, sorry - I meant the fellow who suggested that "my" generation had
> > > no ability to discipline, or something silly like that! :)
> >
> > Ah, I missed that one. If you include a little snippet of the post to
which
> > you are replying, everyone can tell.
>
> If you viewed the conversation threaded like most newsgroup
> participants, you wouldn't keep having this problem.

I thought you were a bit "netiquette" proponent, Miss Spoiler. lol
>
> For someone who bellows continually about how people should post
> whatever they want and however they like, you sure seem to like to
> dictate to others what they should be commenting on and how they should
> post. Hypocrite.
>

You are such an angry woman. It is going to affect your health
one day, if it has not already. You seem to be a "wellness" proponent
in other areas, have you thought about anger management?

Charlie Wilkes
November 14th 05, 02:30 PM
On 13 Nov 2005 23:52:26 -0800, "-L." > wrote:

>
>cybercat wrote:
>> "MaryLyon" > wrote in message
>> ups.com...
>> > Greetings,
>> >
>> > No, sorry - I meant the fellow who suggested that "my" generation had
>> > no ability to discipline, or something silly like that! :)
>>
>> Ah, I missed that one. If you include a little snippet of the post to which
>> you are replying, everyone can tell.
>
>If you viewed the conversation threaded like most newsgroup
>participants, you wouldn't keep having this problem.
>
>For someone who bellows continually about how people should post
>whatever they want and however they like, you sure seem to like to
>dictate to others what they should be commenting on and how they should
>post. Hypocrite.
>
>-L.

Come on, Lyn. Give it a rest. It's a suggestion, not an attempt to
dictate how anyone posts. This is an interesting problem. What do
you think? Are tricyclics a good idea for a stressed-out cat who has
been uprooted from his home and is now attacking his owner's wife?

Charlie

-L.
November 14th 05, 07:07 PM
Charlie Wilkes wrote:
>
> Come on, Lyn. Give it a rest. It's a suggestion, not an attempt to
> dictate how anyone posts.

Um, yeah, whatever, Charles. The hypocrisy is abundant from her.

>This is an interesting problem. What do
> you think? Are tricyclics a good idea for a stressed-out cat who has
> been uprooted from his home and is now attacking his owner's wife?
>

Yes. But the problem is as Megan stated - they are threatening the
cat. Do not ever approach an agressive cat with agression - no squirt
bottles, no brooms, no swats. Megan pretty much summed up the
situation and protocol for correcting the behavior, so I see no need to
comment further.

-L.

Charlie Wilkes
November 15th 05, 10:22 AM
On 14 Nov 2005 10:07:39 -0800, "-L." > wrote:

>
>Charlie Wilkes wrote:
>>
>> Come on, Lyn. Give it a rest. It's a suggestion, not an attempt to
>> dictate how anyone posts.
>
>Um, yeah, whatever, Charles. The hypocrisy is abundant from her.
>
>>This is an interesting problem. What do
>> you think? Are tricyclics a good idea for a stressed-out cat who has
>> been uprooted from his home and is now attacking his owner's wife?
>>
>
>Yes. But the problem is as Megan stated - they are threatening the
>cat. Do not ever approach an agressive cat with agression - no squirt
>bottles, no brooms, no swats. Megan pretty much summed up the
>situation and protocol for correcting the behavior, so I see no need to
>comment further.
>
I asked because I wanted to poll your opinion re drugs for feline
aggression.

Indeed Megan's advice is consistent with what behaviorists are doing,
insofar as I can tell through a cursory web search.

Charlie

-L.
November 15th 05, 11:21 AM
Charlie Wilkes wrote:
> >
> I asked because I wanted to poll your opinion re drugs for feline
> aggression.

An aggressive cat is usually a scared cat. Sometimes it can be
corrected through behavior modification alone - many times meds are
needed. In this case I wouldn't think twice about medicating the cat
because of all of the stress the cat has been under. There's only been
one instance I have encountered when an aggressive cat could not be
controlled/healed and that was a case where the vet suspected some sort
of tumor or cyst on the brain - but upon necropsy, none was detected.
Weirdest case I have ever seen - the cat just flipped out one day and
started attacking the owner for no apparent reason. He would vacillate
between being ok and attacking her with vengence. The attacks
escalated, and eventually she decided to euthanize him as no treatments
were working and he was dangerous. We were the third vet she had been
to, to try to get him controlled. When I handled the cat, he was
more aggressive than any animal I have ever seen up-cose and personal.
He was wicked ****ed!

-L.

MaryLyon
November 15th 05, 07:51 PM
Greetings:

Thanks to all who suggested that I seek medical reatment for my bitten
hand. It definitely became infected, and I got a tetanus shot and some
antibiotics. They also X-Rayed my hand to see if any teeth broke off in
the skin (eeeuuuww), but none had.

Aggressive Guy has been spending more time with my husband, and is now
allowed in the house, albeit ina locked room away from the others and,
of course, me. He seems very happy with this arrangement, and never
cries when he is inside, even though he is not with my husband. I've
been giving him treats, and refuse to bring the broom out with me any
more. However, he really clearly hates my guts. He seems perfectly
content and sweet, but when he sees me (even if I have a treat or am
talking sweetly to him) he swishes his tail and gets that "I'm gonna
kill you, bitch!" look in his eye. Sure is strange, but I remain
hopeful that we can work this out.

Thanks again!

Best, Amy :)

whitershadeofpale
November 15th 05, 10:26 PM
MaryLyon wrote:

> Any suggestions as to how I can get this fellow to see that I want
> nothing more than to love him and pet him would be greatly appreciated.
> I have no idea what to do, I've never had an animal not love me - ever!
>
> Thanks!
>
> Best, Amy :)

don't be scared!

Sounds like he is CRAZY about you

STALKING YOU?!?

Hmmm, you have quite the imacination

MaryLyon
November 15th 05, 10:26 PM
Greetings:

I forgot to mention that when I went to the doctor, the nurse had to
fill out a "bite card," thus labeling my cat as a registered bite
offender! Apparently, they have to report animal bites and gonorrhea
(imagine the paperwork if someone had both! :) )

I was assured nothing would come of this, but today I got a call from
animal control. Apparently now this guy must be quarantined! He can
remain in our home, but has to be kept from anyone who is not a family
member (not hard, we are alone here). But my husband has to provide
proof of shots, and if we board him for Thanksgiving, the vet has to be
notified that he is under quarantine. Can you believe this? I swear, if
I had known this would happen, I would have thought twice about seeking
medical treatment (though I'm glad I did, my hand is MUCH better
today). It's not really a hassle, but it IS rather undignified...

So this cat now has his own caseworker. If only he knew the trouble he
has caused! He's a feline delinquent, I tell ya! (Cue music for
"Officer Krupke...")

Best, Amy :)

PawsForThought
November 16th 05, 01:23 AM
MaryLyon wrote:
I swear, if
> I had known this would happen, I would have thought twice about seeking
> medical treatment (though I'm glad I did, my hand is MUCH better
> today). It's not really a hassle, but it IS rather undignified...

You absolutely did the right thing in seeking medical treatment. But,
and hopefully there won't be a next time you get bit, you can simply
say it was a stray cat.

5cats
November 16th 05, 02:18 AM
PawsForThought wrote:

>
> MaryLyon wrote:
> I swear, if
>> I had known this would happen, I would have thought twice about seeking
>> medical treatment (though I'm glad I did, my hand is MUCH better
>> today). It's not really a hassle, but it IS rather undignified...
>
> You absolutely did the right thing in seeking medical treatment. But,
> and hopefully there won't be a next time you get bit, you can simply
> say it was a stray cat.
>
>

Probably not be a good idea, they'd probably make her take rabies shots if
they think that the cat isn't available for observation.

CatNipped
November 16th 05, 04:18 AM
"Diane" > wrote in message
...
> In article . com>,
> "MaryLyon" > wrote:
>
> > I forgot to mention that when I went to the doctor, the nurse had to
> > fill out a "bite card," thus labeling my cat as a registered bite
> > offender! Apparently, they have to report animal bites and gonorrhea
> > (imagine the paperwork if someone had both! :) )
>
> I'm glad this has never come up with Hodge. It's bad enough that, when
> he boards, he gets the neon orange "MAY BITE" sticker on his cage. :)

"May bite"!?? Hah, what a wuss! Bandit gets the "WILL BITE" sticker on her
cage!! ;>

Hugs,

CatNipped

> --
> Web site: http://www.slywy.com/
> Message board: http://www.slywy.com/phpBB2/
> Journal: http://slywy.diaryland.com/

MaryLyon
November 16th 05, 05:51 AM
Greetings:

Aggressive Guy has a Will Bite sticker on his chart at home - if only
he knew what his reputation was... :)

Has anyone ever had a cat quarantined? Does anyone think a vet will
decline to board him over Thanksgiving, now that he has been labeled as
a menace to society? :)

Best, Amy :)

-L.
November 16th 05, 06:14 AM
MaryLyon wrote:
> Greetings:
>
> Aggressive Guy has a Will Bite sticker on his chart at home - if only
> he knew what his reputation was... :)
>
> Has anyone ever had a cat quarantined? Does anyone think a vet will
> decline to board him over Thanksgiving, now that he has been labeled as
> a menace to society? :)
>
> Best, Amy :)

Unlikely that they will turn you away. Call the vet now and explain
the situation. They have ways of handling biters.
-L.

PawsForThought
November 17th 05, 03:12 AM
5cats wrote:
> PawsForThought wrote:
>
> >
> > MaryLyon wrote:
> > I swear, if
> >> I had known this would happen, I would have thought twice about seeking
> >> medical treatment (though I'm glad I did, my hand is MUCH better
> >> today). It's not really a hassle, but it IS rather undignified...
> >
> > You absolutely did the right thing in seeking medical treatment. But,
> > and hopefully there won't be a next time you get bit, you can simply
> > say it was a stray cat.
> >
> >
>
> Probably not be a good idea, they'd probably make her take rabies shots if
> they think that the cat isn't available for observation.

Oh dear, didn't even think of that :(

Rebecca Root
November 17th 05, 03:15 AM
On 2005-11-15 21:51:37 -0700, "MaryLyon" > said:

> Greetings:
>
> Aggressive Guy has a Will Bite sticker on his chart at home - if only
> he knew what his reputation was... :)
>
> Has anyone ever had a cat quarantined? Does anyone think a vet will
> decline to board him over Thanksgiving, now that he has been labeled as
> a menace to society? :)
>
> Best, Amy :)

My Mom's cat has rap sheet for the same reason, but she still boards
him with no problem. Noah has two strikes, so he's treading on thin ice.

Kitkat
November 22nd 05, 05:21 AM
CatNipped wrote:
> "Diane" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>In article . com>,
>> "MaryLyon" > wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I forgot to mention that when I went to the doctor, the nurse had to
>>>fill out a "bite card," thus labeling my cat as a registered bite
>>>offender! Apparently, they have to report animal bites and gonorrhea
>>>(imagine the paperwork if someone had both! :) )
>>
>>I'm glad this has never come up with Hodge. It's bad enough that, when
>>he boards, he gets the neon orange "MAY BITE" sticker on his cage. :)
>
>
> "May bite"!?? Hah, what a wuss! Bandit gets the "WILL BITE" sticker on her
> cage!! ;>
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped

so did dudley, he who is blind and deaf!!! now he has only his fangs, so
maybe he isnt soooo dangerous!!!!!!!!! lol

pam

cybercat
November 22nd 05, 05:34 AM
"Kitkat" > wrote in message
...
> CatNipped wrote:
> > "Diane" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >
> >>In article . com>,
> >> "MaryLyon" > wrote:
> >>
> >>
> >>>I forgot to mention that when I went to the doctor, the nurse had to
> >>>fill out a "bite card," thus labeling my cat as a registered bite
> >>>offender! Apparently, they have to report animal bites and gonorrhea
> >>>(imagine the paperwork if someone had both! :) )
> >>
> >>I'm glad this has never come up with Hodge. It's bad enough that, when
> >>he boards, he gets the neon orange "MAY BITE" sticker on his cage. :)
> >
> >
> > "May bite"!?? Hah, what a wuss! Bandit gets the "WILL BITE" sticker on
her
> > cage!! ;>
> >
> > Hugs,
> >
> > CatNipped
>
> so did dudley, he who is blind and deaf!!! now he has only his fangs, so
> maybe he isnt soooo dangerous!!!!!!!!! lol
>

Awww. He's a vampidud. :)