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Scudo
November 14th 05, 11:54 AM
We have a pet cat and he seems healthy enough not overweight or anything.
The cat is 6 years old.

Winter is approaching and we generally let him sleep in the garage rather
than the house, he has some old blankets that he curls up in and seems happy
enough. We also feed him in the garage.

At what point would it become uncomfortable (temperature wise) for him in
the garage, as we will then let him sleep in th house. Current temp. is
around 45F and only few days over next few months will it drop to a minus.
The garage does have a radiator that comes on am & pm but not all day.

advice appreciated.
thanks

November 14th 05, 12:28 PM
Scudo wrote:
> We have a pet cat and he seems healthy enough not overweight or anything.
> The cat is 6 years old.
>
> Winter is approaching and we generally let him sleep in the garage rather
> than the house, he has some old blankets that he curls up in and seems happy
> enough. We also feed him in the garage.
>
> At what point would it become uncomfortable (temperature wise) for him in
> the garage, as we will then let him sleep in th house. Current temp. is
> around 45F and only few days over next few months will it drop to a minus.
> The garage does have a radiator that comes on am & pm but not all day.
>
> advice appreciated.
> thanks

What is minus? Do you mean -10F for example?

Is this cat a long-haired or short-haired? Is this a breed that likes
cold weather?

In any case, if it were my situation, I would give the cat an
opportunity to stay in the house at each cold drop in temperature. When
it went into the 30's, I would bring the cat inside and see if the cat
wished to stay inside. I would not be surprised that as it drops below
freezing, most cats would want to come inside, that is, below 32
Fahrenheit. If the cat preferred the garage, then wait until the 20's.
I would not wait until temperatures below 0 degrees Fahrenheit. Or you
can just bring the cat inside now. The cat will tell you that the
garage is preferable or not by the behavior, such as, sitting by the
door to get outside or back to the garage or meowing and running to the
door.

My cat does not like to be outside in the 30's. But I have seen other
cats in the mountains who do not seem to mind temperature in the 30's.
But they had long-hair and were quite bushy compared to my cat. I
cannot image an ordinary cat wanting to be in sub-freezing conditions
unless a polar bear.

Scudo
November 14th 05, 06:43 PM
"Brandy Alexandre" > wrote in message
...
> > wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.health+behav:
>
> >
> > Scudo wrote:
> >> We have a pet cat and he seems healthy enough not overweight or
> >> anything. The cat is 6 years old.
> >>
> >> Winter is approaching and we generally let him sleep in the
> >> garage rather than the house, he has some old blankets that he
> >> curls up in and seems happy enough. We also feed him in the
> >> garage.
> >>
> >> At what point would it become uncomfortable (temperature wise)
> >> for him in the garage, as we will then let him sleep in th house.
> >> Current temp. is around 45F and only few days over next few
> >> months will it drop to a minus. The garage does have a radiator
> >> that comes on am & pm but not all day.
> >>
> >> advice appreciated.
> >> thanks
> >
> > What is minus? Do you mean -10F for example?
> >
> > Is this cat a long-haired or short-haired? Is this a breed that
> > likes cold weather?
> >
> > In any case, if it were my situation, I would give the cat an
> > opportunity to stay in the house at each cold drop in temperature.
> > When it went into the 30's, I would bring the cat inside and see
> > if the cat wished to stay inside. I would not be surprised that as
> > it drops below freezing, most cats would want to come inside, that
> > is, below 32 Fahrenheit. If the cat preferred the garage, then
> > wait until the 20's. I would not wait until temperatures below 0
> > degrees Fahrenheit. Or you can just bring the cat inside now. The
> > cat will tell you that the garage is preferable or not by the
> > behavior, such as, sitting by the door to get outside or back to
> > the garage or meowing and running to the door.
> >
> > My cat does not like to be outside in the 30's. But I have seen
> > other cats in the mountains who do not seem to mind temperature in
> > the 30's. But they had long-hair and were quite bushy compared to
> > my cat. I cannot image an ordinary cat wanting to be in
> > sub-freezing conditions unless a polar bear.
> >
> >
>
> My neighbor moved here from Colorado and her cat LOVES cold weather
> and to play in the snow. She said he's going to be very
> disappointed because it doesn't snow here but once or twice a year
> and it doesn't stick. I agree that you just have to tune in to the
> cat. He'll let you know if he wants to be inside.

Sorry guys I have mixed up temperatures.. C & F The temp I quoted was 45 F
and the minus bit is below 32F (not in C as I implied)
The cat is just a normal moggy no particular breed and short haired.

>
> --
> Brandy AlexandreŽ
> http://www.swydm.com/?refer=BrandyAlx
> Well, would you?

Spot
November 14th 05, 11:15 PM
I'm just wondering why he's not allowed to sleep in the house all the time?

I find for the most part cats prefer the heat and warmth and I'd think in
the winter they would even more. My oldest used to rocket out the door
occasionally and he did this one night it was snowing and I had to go
somewhere. When he wouldn't come when called I put a blanket on the chair
on the porch and left. Three hours later I came home to find him curled
into the blanket with a layer of blown snow on him. The 3 hours out pretty
much cured him of sneaking out of the house in the winter. He has no desire
what so ever to venture out when it's cold now.

Celeste



"Scudo" > wrote in message
. uk...
> We have a pet cat and he seems healthy enough not overweight or anything.
> The cat is 6 years old.
>
> Winter is approaching and we generally let him sleep in the garage rather
> than the house, he has some old blankets that he curls up in and seems
> happy
> enough. We also feed him in the garage.
>
> At what point would it become uncomfortable (temperature wise) for him in
> the garage, as we will then let him sleep in th house. Current temp. is
> around 45F and only few days over next few months will it drop to a
> minus.
> The garage does have a radiator that comes on am & pm but not all day.
>
> advice appreciated.
> thanks
>
>
>
>

Karen
November 15th 05, 12:30 AM
On 2005-11-14 12:43:43 -0600, "Scudo" > said:

>
> "Brandy Alexandre" > wrote in message
> ...
>> > wrote in
>> rec.pets.cats.health+behav:
>>
>>>
>>> Scudo wrote:
>>>> We have a pet cat and he seems healthy enough not overweight or
>>>> anything. The cat is 6 years old.
>>>>
>>>> Winter is approaching and we generally let him sleep in the
>>>> garage rather than the house, he has some old blankets that he
>>>> curls up in and seems happy enough. We also feed him in the
>>>> garage.
>>>>
>>>> At what point would it become uncomfortable (temperature wise)
>>>> for him in the garage, as we will then let him sleep in th house.
>>>> Current temp. is around 45F and only few days over next few
>>>> months will it drop to a minus. The garage does have a radiator
>>>> that comes on am & pm but not all day.
>>>>
>>>> advice appreciated.
>>>> thanks
>>>
>>> What is minus? Do you mean -10F for example?
>>>
>>> Is this cat a long-haired or short-haired? Is this a breed that
>>> likes cold weather?
>>>
>>> In any case, if it were my situation, I would give the cat an
>>> opportunity to stay in the house at each cold drop in temperature.
>>> When it went into the 30's, I would bring the cat inside and see
>>> if the cat wished to stay inside. I would not be surprised that as
>>> it drops below freezing, most cats would want to come inside, that
>>> is, below 32 Fahrenheit. If the cat preferred the garage, then
>>> wait until the 20's. I would not wait until temperatures below 0
>>> degrees Fahrenheit. Or you can just bring the cat inside now. The
>>> cat will tell you that the garage is preferable or not by the
>>> behavior, such as, sitting by the door to get outside or back to
>>> the garage or meowing and running to the door.
>>>
>>> My cat does not like to be outside in the 30's. But I have seen
>>> other cats in the mountains who do not seem to mind temperature in
>>> the 30's. But they had long-hair and were quite bushy compared to
>>> my cat. I cannot image an ordinary cat wanting to be in
>>> sub-freezing conditions unless a polar bear.
>>>
>>>
>>
>> My neighbor moved here from Colorado and her cat LOVES cold weather
>> and to play in the snow. She said he's going to be very
>> disappointed because it doesn't snow here but once or twice a year
>> and it doesn't stick. I agree that you just have to tune in to the
>> cat. He'll let you know if he wants to be inside.
>
> Sorry guys I have mixed up temperatures.. C & F The temp I quoted was 45 F
> and the minus bit is below 32F (not in C as I implied)
> The cat is just a normal moggy no particular breed and short haired.
>
>>
>> --
>> Brandy AlexandreŽ
>> http://www.swydm.com/?refer=BrandyAlx
>> Well, would you?

Why not put a cat flap in the door between house and garage so he can
decide what is too cold?

November 15th 05, 12:45 AM
Scudo wrote:
> Sorry guys I have mixed up temperatures.. C & F The temp I quoted was 45 F
> and the minus bit is below 32F (not in C as I implied)
> The cat is just a normal moggy no particular breed and short haired.

You meant by "minus" then below freezing which is 32 degrees
Fahrenheit.
I am spelling this out. I see now the confusion.

And by "C", you meant 0 degrees Celsius which is 32 degrees Fahrenheit.

Okay.

So your question deals with temperatures in the 20's or so for
Fahrenheit. [which would be minus in Celsius]. I agree it's not a good
idea to mix and match Celsius and Fahrenheit especially when discussing
freezing temperatures.

I was wondering, because minus degrees Fahrenheit is cold storage
freezer weather and I could not imagine many ordinary cats doing well
in that.

And this gets complicated because the temperature in the garage will
vary during the day but probably without heat - I get the sense that
the heater does not come on in the middle of the night when it's
coldest - could get quite cold.

Does the cat not like to go inside or you prefer the cat to be kind of
outside?

In any event, the cat will let you know. Are there complex issues like
a dog inside or other situations?

Snittens
November 15th 05, 02:35 AM
"Scudo" > wrote in message
. uk...
> We have a pet cat and he seems healthy enough not overweight or anything.
> The cat is 6 years old.
>
> Winter is approaching and we generally let him sleep in the garage rather
> than the house, he has some old blankets that he curls up in and seems
> happy
> enough. We also feed him in the garage.
>


Why can't he sleep and eat in the house?

Scudo
November 15th 05, 08:06 AM
"Snittens" > wrote in message
. ..
>
> "Scudo" > wrote in message
> . uk...
> > We have a pet cat and he seems healthy enough not overweight or
anything.
> > The cat is 6 years old.
> >
> > Winter is approaching and we generally let him sleep in the garage
rather
> > than the house, he has some old blankets that he curls up in and seems
> > happy
> > enough. We also feed him in the garage.
> >
>
>
> Why can't he sleep and eat in the house?

My wife has athsma and there is a dog in house, the dog and cat get on ok
but the cat has a habit of urinating in the dogs basket, then the dog wont
sleep in the basket and it just upsets the balance slightly. I am not saying
I wont let it in but I am trying to keep it to the minimum and I have no
intention of letting the cat be uncomfortable hence the original question.
I would also add that my wife is in denial regarding the cat and dog
irritating her asthma (thats another story) so I have to do what I can re
that situation.
Winter here is not severe, from now to March next year we will be lucky if
there are 10 days of snow in total and probably a similar amount of days
where the temp drops below freezing, below freezing usually only drops to
about -3 or -4 C and I have never had anything freeze over in the garage in
16 years.
>
>

Catlover Medway via CatKB.com
November 15th 05, 02:31 PM
Hi, - how about a thermostatically controlled igloo such as this...

http://www.catac.co.uk/html/productlist.asp?id=4

But I agree the ideal would be to have puss as an integral part of the family
- has your wife been to her doctor to absolutely confirm the cause of her
asthma? I believe there is de-sensitization treatment these days.

Another thing to consider would be trying to re-introduce the cat and dog
carefully - here's some advice (you need to register to enter the site, but
that's quick and easy).

http://www.fabcats.org/introducing.html

If all fails though, can the heating be kept on?

Scudo wrote:
>> > We have a pet cat and he seems healthy enough not overweight or anything.
>> > The cat is 6 years old.
>[quoted text clipped - 5 lines]
>>
>> Why can't he sleep and eat in the house?
>
>My wife has athsma and there is a dog in house, the dog and cat get on ok
>but the cat has a habit of urinating in the dogs basket, then the dog wont
>sleep in the basket and it just upsets the balance slightly. I am not saying
>I wont let it in but I am trying to keep it to the minimum and I have no
>intention of letting the cat be uncomfortable hence the original question.
>I would also add that my wife is in denial regarding the cat and dog
>irritating her asthma (thats another story) so I have to do what I can re
>that situation.
>Winter here is not severe, from now to March next year we will be lucky if
>there are 10 days of snow in total and probably a similar amount of days
>where the temp drops below freezing, below freezing usually only drops to
>about -3 or -4 C and I have never had anything freeze over in the garage in
>16 years.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200511/1

Dick Peavey
November 17th 05, 02:01 PM
"Scudo" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Snittens" > wrote in message

>> Why can't he sleep and eat in the house?
>
> My wife has athsma and there is a dog in house, the dog and cat get on ok
> but the cat has a habit of urinating in the dogs basket, then the dog
> wont
> sleep in the basket and it just upsets the balance slightly. I am not
> saying
> I wont let it in but I am trying to keep it to the minimum and I have no
> intention of letting the cat be uncomfortable hence the original question.
> I would also add that my wife is in denial regarding the cat and dog
> irritating her asthma (thats another story) so I have to do what I can re
> that situation.
> Winter here is not severe, from now to March next year we will be lucky if
> there are 10 days of snow in total and probably a similar amount of days
> where the temp drops below freezing, below freezing usually only drops to
> about -3 or -4 C and I have never had anything freeze over in the garage
> in
> 16 years.

Interesting. I started out the same way with my stray Squeaky, who was to be
a "garage" cat because of my wife's allergy. I managed to talk my wife into
getting tested for allergies, she was a good sport, and it turns out that
she isn't allergic to cats. There is so much crud in the air in this part of
Texas God knows what was causing her eyes to water, but it wasn't cats.

So, Squeaky moved in from the garage.

Perhaps your wife can be talked into getting tested? Why does cat bother her
and not dog? Should the test confirm the allergy, then of course, humans
come first, and the cat should remain a garage cat.

It turns out that my wife had a horrible experience with cats as a little
girl that I didn't know about. I advise being sensitive to this sort of
thing.

She has warmed up to Squeaky considerably because the little guy is so
endearing.

I'm reaching the conclusion that one must pass Cats 101 with a B or better
as prerequisite to Beginning Humans.

Dick

Kitkat
November 24th 05, 07:00 AM
Scudo wrote:
>
> I would also add that my wife is in denial regarding the cat and dog
> irritating her asthma (thats another story) so I have to do what I can re
> that situation.

I resemble that remark. DH doesn't even like to talk about my
allergies/asthma since I am stubborn and have 2 cats.

How could I give up my kits?!

November 24th 05, 02:06 PM
Kitkat wrote:
> Scudo wrote:
> >
> > I would also add that my wife is in denial regarding the cat and dog
> > irritating her asthma (thats another story) so I have to do what I can re
> > that situation.
>
> I resemble that remark. DH doesn't even like to talk about my
> allergies/asthma since I am stubborn and have 2 cats.
>
> How could I give up my kits?!

Nope, take up yoga. It's worth a shot, pun intended. A long time ago,
before there was a popular internet, someone did a study. And found
that if stress levels could be reduced - don't remember the criteria
for that, whether biological like endorphins or psychological like a
survey - the allergens although present could not cause the allergic
reaction. In other words, relaxation did not reduce the allergens in
the blood, but did reduce the response to the allergens.

If you are already as calm as a cat, then the above paragraph is not
meaningful unless you are not really calm but think you are calm ;)

Kitkat
November 25th 05, 05:15 AM
wrote:
> Kitkat wrote:
>
>>Scudo wrote:
>>
>>>I would also add that my wife is in denial regarding the cat and dog
>>>irritating her asthma (thats another story) so I have to do what I can re
>>>that situation.
>>
>>I resemble that remark. DH doesn't even like to talk about my
>>allergies/asthma since I am stubborn and have 2 cats.
>>
>>How could I give up my kits?!
>
>
> Nope, take up yoga. It's worth a shot, pun intended. A long time ago,
> before there was a popular internet, someone did a study. And found
> that if stress levels could be reduced - don't remember the criteria
> for that, whether biological like endorphins or psychological like a
> survey - the allergens although present could not cause the allergic
> reaction. In other words, relaxation did not reduce the allergens in
> the blood, but did reduce the response to the allergens.
>
> If you are already as calm as a cat, then the above paragraph is not
> meaningful unless you are not really calm but think you are calm ;)
>

I am *definitely* a lot less calm than I'd like to think I am. My cats
help though. That is one of the jillions of reasons I couldn't give them
up. They calm my nerves SO much.

I am terrified of having kids someday that are allergic. What would I do
then? Cant exactly send my newborn to a yoga class. ;)

gosh i love my cats!
pam

November 25th 05, 11:27 PM
Kitkat wrote:
> wrote:
> > Kitkat wrote:
> >
> >>Scudo wrote:
> >>
> >>>I would also add that my wife is in denial regarding the cat and dog
> >>>irritating her asthma (thats another story) so I have to do what I can re
> >>>that situation.
> >>
> >>I resemble that remark. DH doesn't even like to talk about my
> >>allergies/asthma since I am stubborn and have 2 cats.
> >>
> >>How could I give up my kits?!
> >
> >
> > Nope, take up yoga. It's worth a shot, pun intended. A long time ago,
> > before there was a popular internet, someone did a study. And found
> > that if stress levels could be reduced - don't remember the criteria
> > for that, whether biological like endorphins or psychological like a
> > survey - the allergens although present could not cause the allergic
> > reaction. In other words, relaxation did not reduce the allergens in
> > the blood, but did reduce the response to the allergens.
> >
> > If you are already as calm as a cat, then the above paragraph is not
> > meaningful unless you are not really calm but think you are calm ;)
> >
>
> I am *definitely* a lot less calm than I'd like to think I am. My cats
> help though. That is one of the jillions of reasons I couldn't give them
> up. They calm my nerves SO much.
>
> I am terrified of having kids someday that are allergic. What would I do
> then? Cant exactly send my newborn to a yoga class. ;)
>
> gosh i love my cats!
> pam

Sure you can. Yoga for pregnant women as an early start.
A little meditation, some gentle stretching, start training in the womb
I say :)
Might have an effect on the newborn. Take your newborn to a private
yoga class, you, a mat, and the newborn. See what happens. Not much
risk is there?
And the little ones exposed to cats and pets will probably have less
allergies than others in a more sterile environment or so said a
popular study.

white coco
December 9th 05, 08:23 AM
Cat like to live in warm place.Your cat can get warm from the heat of a
car in the garage.You feed him every meal.So,your cat like to live
there because,it warm for him and he has food toeat every day.Cat
thinks the garage is the safe place for him.

white coco
December 9th 05, 08:25 AM
If you have any stories of have any questions.You can ask me.

NMR
December 9th 05, 02:47 PM
And we think you are a moron
"white coco" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Cat like to live in warm place.Your cat can get warm from the heat of a
> car in the garage.You feed him every meal.So,your cat like to live
> there because,it warm for him and he has food toeat every day.Cat
> thinks the garage is the safe place for him.
>

whitershadeofpale
December 9th 05, 02:53 PM
white coco wrote:
> If you have any stories of have any questions.You can ask me.


I think you and John Doe will get along jest fine.

cybercat
December 9th 05, 04:35 PM
"whitershadeofpale" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> white coco wrote:
> > If you have any stories of have any questions.You can ask me.
>
>
> I think you and John Doe will get along jest fine.
>

**** that. We need a kitty report.