PDA

View Full Version : Rabid Cats


whitershadeofpale
November 19th 05, 02:52 AM
This sounds silly, but I didn't know cats could carry rabies.
You just never hear of it I guess.

I suppose caution should be used when handling strays.

MaryL
November 19th 05, 03:22 AM
"whitershadeofpale" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> This sounds silly, but I didn't know cats could carry rabies.
> You just never hear of it I guess.
>
> I suppose caution should be used when handling strays.
>

I think almost *any* mammal can carry rabies, although some are more noted
for it than others. So, yes, you should take care in handling animals --
although you are more likely to face problems from infection than from
rabies. However, if bitten, it is *essential* to contact a doctor ASAP,
especially if it is a cat not under your control (and therefore one that can
be quarantined).

MaryL

November 19th 05, 04:34 AM
Diane wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote:
>
> > "whitershadeofpale" > wrote in message
> > oups.com...
> > > This sounds silly, but I didn't know cats could carry rabies.
> > > You just never hear of it I guess.
> > >
> > > I suppose caution should be used when handling strays.
> > >
> >
> > I think almost *any* mammal can carry rabies, although some are more noted
> > for it than others.
>
> It's Carnivora and bats only that transmit it.

But cattle can also transmit rabies to humans. They are herbivore,
right?

Sherry
> --
> Web site: http://www.slywy.com/
> Message board: http://www.slywy.com/phpBB2/
> Journal: http://slywy.diaryland.com/

MaryL
November 19th 05, 04:34 AM
"Diane" > wrote in message
...
> In article <[email protected]>,
> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote:
>
>> "whitershadeofpale" > wrote in message
>> oups.com...
>> > This sounds silly, but I didn't know cats could carry rabies.
>> > You just never hear of it I guess.
>> >
>> > I suppose caution should be used when handling strays.
>> >
>>
>> I think almost *any* mammal can carry rabies, although some are more
>> noted
>> for it than others.
>
> It's Carnivora and bats only that transmit it.
> --
> Web site: http://www.slywy.com/
> Message board: http://www.slywy.com/phpBB2/
> Journal: http://slywy.diaryland.com/

Not quite true. For example, even opossums can carry rabies (although it's
rare).

MaryL

No More Retail
November 19th 05, 04:41 AM
Folks any mammal or warm blood creature can carry and trasmit rabies below
is a quote from the cdc

It is not a fun disease I have had the Imovax vaccine 5 times so far the
treatment sucks big time

http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvrd/rabies/

What animals get rabies?

A: Any mammal can get rabies. The most common wild reservoirs of rabies are
raccoons, skunks, bats, foxes, and coyotes. Domestic mammals can also get
rabies. Cats, cattle, and dogs are the most frequently reported rabid
domestic animals in the United States

§cratch
November 19th 05, 12:28 PM
Diane wrote:

> Well, I sit corrected.
lol
>When I heard a speaker on rabies from the CDC
> address this, he said that carnivores and bats are the transmitters
> (that others can get it); a lot of his explanation had to do with how
> the disease progresses.
>
> Cows -- between mad cow, rabies, etc., they're thinking -- IT'S PAYBACK
> TIME!

it's a series of shot into the stomach right
with a long needle
that was just from memory, I might be thinking of another cure

November 19th 05, 12:44 PM
hi, i'm a lurker but this thread really hits home. last sunday i was
bitten by a stray cat. i knew better than to pet it but had been
feeding it and it was so friendly. i think it might be a neighbor cat
who doesn't really take care of it very well.

anyway, my hand swelled up and the next day i had to report it (a law in
Virginia) and go to doc and get tetnus shot and on very strong augmentin
for a week. i had to capture the cat (not a problem, like i said, he
seems very gentle except for the bite) and take to the humane society
for a 10 day quarantine.

to date, cat is fine, i'm fine but i learned a very valuable lesson with
thinking every cat is my friend. what will happen to the cat if its ok?
of course i will adopt it and do all the proper shots/spay/neuter, etc
and hopefully give it a home if it doesn't run back to wherever it came
from. i already have 5 cats (all indoor) but this one deserves a chance
too.

so take caution when dealing with stray cats or any animals. and cross
your fingers i'm rabid free !! LOL

amary

whitershadeofpale
November 19th 05, 01:00 PM
wrote:

> so take caution when dealing with stray cats or any animals. and cross
> your fingers i'm rabid free !! LOL
>
> amary

I'm in Virginia too.

sorry you got bit! I reckon he didn't know what you was planning for
him.

but you're hand swole up! That's what someone was saying, infection is
a more common danger than rabies.

Hope the swelling is going down!

November 19th 05, 02:35 PM
Diane wrote:
>
> Cows -- between mad cow, rabies, etc., they're thinking -- IT'S PAYBACK
> TIME!
>
> BTW, a cousin had to get a rabies series (bat bit him), and it was so
> pleasant, he skipped the last one.

Diane, my DH had to take the rabies series way back in the early 70's.
He quit midway through. We were 18 years old at the time. Anyway, it
*was* horrible. The health department, sheriff's department and
doctor's office was calling night and day. He never did finish it. They
say God looks after fools and children. Proof positive.

November 19th 05, 02:37 PM
No More Retail wrote:
> Barry when we get a new addition to the shelter we use heavy gloves and
> clothing to handle them. they get quarantined for about 30 days depending
> on what vaccinations. There are warning signs for infected and active rabid
> animals. Make sure you get your update shots before doing this
> "whitershadeofpale" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> > This sounds silly, but I didn't know cats could carry rabies.
> > You just never hear of it I guess.
> >
> > I suppose caution should be used when handling strays.

One of the best investments we ever made was a good pair of Kevlar
gloves. Up until then, we just used welding gloves. They're so
expensive though, I wig out everytime I see someone has left them lying
around carelessly. But they are worth it.

Sherry

No More Retail
November 19th 05, 06:18 PM
Depending on the vaccine series depends on where you get them yes the one I
got all where in the stomach

November 19th 05, 06:51 PM
No More Retail wrote:
> Depending on the vaccine series depends on where you get them yes the one I
> got all where in the stomach

Yes, they were all in the stomache. I can't remember whether it was a
21-injection series or 28. After about 10 days he was deathly sick and
getting sicker everytime he got one.
I've heard the treatment is vastly improved now. That was more than 30
years ago.

Sherry

Phil P.
November 19th 05, 09:53 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> One of the best investments we ever made was a good pair of Kevlar
> gloves. Up until then, we just used welding gloves. They're so
> expensive though,


You got them! Aren't they great? Did you get the 18"s or 14"s? They make
you feel brave don't they? LOL!


I wig out everytime I see someone has left them lying
> around carelessly.


I hate lending them out because regardless of what you tell the people, they
still think they're "just gloves"!


> But they are worth it.

Absolutely!

Phil.

whitershadeofpale
November 19th 05, 09:59 PM
Phil P. wrote:

>
> > But they are worth it.
>
> Absolutely!
>
> Phil.

i wouldn't want to lend them out..someone might have just scratched dey
ass

No More Retail
November 20th 05, 02:25 AM
Did you tell them that you wanted to adopt the cat? If you didn't from
my calculations you still have time to make the call due to quarantine
holdings
Not saying it will happen but unless it is a no kill shelter and a very
young cat the cat specially since it has bite some one. The cat will be put
in line for being put to sleep after the quarantine. Most shelters here in
Florida are about 3 days max for animals that bite.

The shelter should have a person that can determine if the cat has any
behavioral problems that you need to know about.
I saw that you try to pet it but how did it happen did you try to pet it
when you put food down? or did you scary the firball by accident? My
experience if it was just a nip they tend to be a warning of don't do that.
If it was a deep bite attack with scratches where the cat attacked and kept
biting. You might have a problem!. There are plenty of people out here that
can help you in that line.

If you are able to adopt him let us know what happens. Please on both
fronts how you are doing from the bite and how the cat is doing. As if you
need help with the spaying and shots I or some one else can direct you to
low cost clinics where ever your area is in Virginia

Matthew aka No More Retail


> wrote in message
...
> hi, i'm a lurker but this thread really hits home. last sunday i was
> bitten by a stray cat. i knew better than to pet it but had been
> feeding it and it was so friendly. i think it might be a neighbor cat
> who doesn't really take care of it very well.
>
> anyway, my hand swelled up and the next day i had to report it (a law in
> Virginia) and go to doc and get tetnus shot and on very strong augmentin
> for a week. i had to capture the cat (not a problem, like i said, he
> seems very gentle except for the bite) and take to the humane society
> for a 10 day quarantine.
>
> to date, cat is fine, i'm fine but i learned a very valuable lesson with
> thinking every cat is my friend. what will happen to the cat if its ok?
> of course i will adopt it and do all the proper shots/spay/neuter, etc
> and hopefully give it a home if it doesn't run back to wherever it came
> from. i already have 5 cats (all indoor) but this one deserves a chance
> too.
>
> so take caution when dealing with stray cats or any animals. and cross
> your fingers i'm rabid free !! LOL
>
> amary
>

November 20th 05, 03:12 AM
Phil P. wrote:
> > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> >
> > One of the best investments we ever made was a good pair of Kevlar
> > gloves. Up until then, we just used welding gloves. They're so
> > expensive though,
>
>
> You got them! Aren't they great? Did you get the 18"s or 14"s? They make
> you feel brave don't they? LOL!
>
>
Oh, yeah I did order them. I'd forgotten we had discussed that. I got
the 18". I didn't order a second pair for home because of the cost, but
I think I will someday. I'd only use them on a rare occasion, but man,
when you need them they're great to have.

Sherry

Phil P.
November 20th 05, 08:11 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Phil P. wrote:
> > > wrote in message
> > oups.com...
> > >
> > > One of the best investments we ever made was a good pair of Kevlar
> > > gloves. Up until then, we just used welding gloves. They're so
> > > expensive though,
> >
> >
> > You got them! Aren't they great? Did you get the 18"s or 14"s? They
make
> > you feel brave don't they? LOL!
> >
> >
> Oh, yeah I did order them. I'd forgotten we had discussed that. I got
> the 18". I didn't order a second pair for home because of the cost, but
> I think I will someday. I'd only use them on a rare occasion, but man,
> when you need them they're great to have.

Yeah, they're like bullet-proof vests- it only takes once to justify the
price. Cat bites with those little daggers can cause osteomyelitis or
septic arthritis or even menigitis.

Phil

November 20th 05, 04:27 PM
Phil P. wrote:
>
> Yeah, they're like bullet-proof vests- it only takes once to justify the
> price. Cat bites with those little daggers can cause osteomyelitis or
> septic arthritis or even menigitis.
>
> Phil

Ooo. Good analagy. The old adage "you get what you pay for" really
applies here. If anybody out there is still using welding gloves, you
won't believe the difference in a good pair of Kevlar gloves that are
*designed* for animal handling. They're not so cumbersome and just fit
better. And you *do* feel injury-proof. That alone helps that you're
concentrating on what you're doing, not worrying about getting hurt.

Sherry

Phil P.
November 20th 05, 07:54 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Phil P. wrote:
> >
> > Yeah, they're like bullet-proof vests- it only takes once to justify the
> > price. Cat bites with those little daggers can cause osteomyelitis or
> > septic arthritis or even menigitis.
> >
> > Phil
>
> Ooo. Good analagy. The old adage "you get what you pay for" really
> applies here. If anybody out there is still using welding gloves, you
> won't believe the difference in a good pair of Kevlar gloves that are
> *designed* for animal handling. They're not so cumbersome and just fit
> better. And you *do* feel injury-proof. That alone helps that you're
> concentrating on what you're doing, not worrying about getting hurt.

You're absolutely right.

There's a night and day difference in dexterity between welder's or
electrician's and kevlar gloves. I've also seen kevlar gloves that have
removable shields on the back- but these are better for handling dogs since
they
have bone-crushing bite force.

The kevlar gloves also allow you handle the cat more gently. I love 'em.

Phil

Phil P.
November 20th 05, 07:57 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Diane wrote:
> >
> > Cows -- between mad cow, rabies, etc., they're thinking -- IT'S PAYBACK
> > TIME!
> >
> > BTW, a cousin had to get a rabies series (bat bit him), and it was so
> > pleasant, he skipped the last one.
>
> Diane, my DH had to take the rabies series way back in the early 70's.
> He quit midway through. We were 18 years old at the time. Anyway, it
> *was* horrible. The health department, sheriff's department and
> doctor's office was calling night and day.

I got bit pretty bad a few years ago- because I was stupid- and required
medical attention. The hospital is required to report cat bites to the BOH
who proceeded to hound every day about getting shots. I finally got them
off
my back by telling them I would get the rabies shots in my eyeballs if they
could produce *one* documented case of cat-vectored rabies in a human in
my state *ever*. They never bothered me again.

They also wanted the cat. I told them the cat ran away- otherwise they
would have unnecessarily quarantined the cat or worse, decapitated the cat
to examine the brain. They usually decapitate the cat only if the cat has
any wounds or symptoms- but they're known for "not taking any chances" and
decapitating the cats anyway. So, I didn't want to "take any chances" that
they would not take any chances.

Phil

whitershadeofpale
November 21st 05, 04:28 AM
No More Retail wrote:
> Did you tell them that you wanted to adopt the cat? If you didn't from
> my calculations you still have time to make the call due to quarantine
> holdi....paying and shots I or some one else can direct you to
> low cost clinics where ever your area is in Virginia
>
> Matthew aka No More Retail


oh just stifle it Edith will ya!