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Ajanta
November 22nd 05, 07:12 PM
There was some discussion here about heat reflecting pads. I have a few
questions: 1/ Do they work? Roughly how many degrees of extra warmth
would they provide? 2/ Is one brand better than others? I have seen one
at Petsmart, another one online at Dr Forster Smith. They all seem to
be around $20.

The stray I feed doesn't live with us, nor wants to as far as I can
tell, but knows where we are and if she showed up on a particularly
cold night we would certainly let her in. (Even those in our household
who don't want a permanent pet living inside won't object to that.)

I am brainstorming about what I can do to increase her options when we
are away for the holidays, should it turn very cold.

There is a basement-ish "room" in our building, more like a very large
storage closet, which is not used at present and I could leave the door
open a few inches with a stopper. It is not heated, nor next to a
heated space, and doesn't have a working electric outlet so I can't do
anything elaborate. However, it will provide complete protection from
wind, rain, and snow.

Only problem is, it would still be cold. I was thinking of setting up a
chair with a cusion, if a add a heat-reflecting pad, would that be a
meanigful extra help?

Phil P.
November 22nd 05, 10:01 PM
"Ajanta" > wrote in message
...
> There was some discussion here about heat reflecting pads. I have a few
> questions: 1/ Do they work? Roughly how many degrees of extra warmth
> would they provide? 2/ Is one brand better than others? I have seen one
> at Petsmart, another one online at Dr Forster Smith. They all seem to
> be around $20.

> The stray I feed doesn't live with us, nor wants to as far as I can
> tell, but knows where we are and if she showed up on a particularly
> cold night we would certainly let her in. (Even those in our household
> who don't want a permanent pet living inside won't object to that.)
>
> I am brainstorming about what I can do to increase her options when we
> are away for the holidays, should it turn very cold.
>
> There is a basement-ish "room" in our building, more like a very large
> storage closet, which is not used at present and I could leave the door
> open a few inches with a stopper. It is not heated, nor next to a
> heated space, and doesn't have a working electric outlet so I can't do
> anything elaborate. However, it will provide complete protection from
> wind, rain, and snow.
>
> Only problem is, it would still be cold. I was thinking of setting up a
> chair with a cusion, if a add a heat-reflecting pad, would that be a
> meanigful extra help?

I don't think you should use any type of cloth material if you won't be
around to change it if it gets wet. Cloth retains moisture and will draw
body heat away from the cat if she comes in wet and lies on it. That's why
I don't use cloth material in winter feral shelters.

Your best bet would be Space Blankets- they're very thin mylar sheets and
reflect
about 80% of the cat's body heat back to the cat. Space blankets are 54" x
84" and cost about
$2-$3 each and come in small packages:

http://www.maxshouse.com/misc/spaceblankets.JPG

http://www.maxshouse.com/Ours/jade_in_space.JPG


You can cover a piece of 2" insulation with the space blanket and cover the
space blanket with straw or hay- cats love to burrow into straw. The most
important things are to keep the shelter dry and off the ground.

You can make a warm and comfy bed for her out of a low rubbermaid storage
bin. A low bin will retain a lot more body heat. The space blankets are
large, so, you can line the inside of the bin to reflect even more heat.

She is sure one lucky cat to have a friend like you!

Phil

Gail
November 23rd 05, 02:14 AM
She does need a place out of the wind, cold, and precipitation. You can use
put a cardboard box in that room, close it up, and open up and area for her
to go in and out. You can fill it with warm, dry blankets. With adequate
food and water, she should be OK.
Gail
"Ajanta" > wrote in message
...
> There was some discussion here about heat reflecting pads. I have a few
> questions: 1/ Do they work? Roughly how many degrees of extra warmth
> would they provide? 2/ Is one brand better than others? I have seen one
> at Petsmart, another one online at Dr Forster Smith. They all seem to
> be around $20.
>
> The stray I feed doesn't live with us, nor wants to as far as I can
> tell, but knows where we are and if she showed up on a particularly
> cold night we would certainly let her in. (Even those in our household
> who don't want a permanent pet living inside won't object to that.)
>
> I am brainstorming about what I can do to increase her options when we
> are away for the holidays, should it turn very cold.
>
> There is a basement-ish "room" in our building, more like a very large
> storage closet, which is not used at present and I could leave the door
> open a few inches with a stopper. It is not heated, nor next to a
> heated space, and doesn't have a working electric outlet so I can't do
> anything elaborate. However, it will provide complete protection from
> wind, rain, and snow.
>
> Only problem is, it would still be cold. I was thinking of setting up a
> chair with a cusion, if a add a heat-reflecting pad, would that be a
> meanigful extra help?

Ajanta
November 23rd 05, 05:54 AM
Phil P. > wrote:

: I don't think you should use any type of cloth material if you won't
: be around to change it if it gets wet...

My original thought was to (1) Use a patio chair and cushion from the
summer (the cushion material does not seem to be cloth; she is also
familiar with these, having used them in the summer). (2) To add a
layer of heat reflecting blanket, something like

<http://www.drsfostersmith.com/Product/Prod_Display.cfm?pcatid=8982&N=20
02+113876>

However, from warmth point of view, it is probably better to have an
enclosed cardboard box and line up all walls with the inexpensive space
blanket you mention below? I could use styrofoam boards for insulation.


Please remember there will be no wind or precipitation in this room,
but the temperature may be what it is outdoors. Too bad there is no
functioning electric outlet, so she will have to go to elsewhere for
water. This arrangement is only for two weeks. I am not contemplating a
permanent shelter. My long term goal still is to install cat doors and
give her access to heated spaces.

Finally, I have no way to know if she needs or will use this device.
For all I know, she may already have a warm spot next to some water
heater. But being unsure I want to give her to an option. Only time
will tell if she used it.

: Your best bet would be Space Blankets- they're very thin mylar sheets and
: reflect
: about 80% of the cat's body heat back to the cat. Space blankets are 54" x
: 84" and cost about
: $2-$3 each and come in small packages:
:
: http://www.maxshouse.com/misc/spaceblankets.JPG
:
: http://www.maxshouse.com/Ours/jade_in_space.JPG

Incredible, my cat looks just like this. Well, so do many others. :-)
What is this breed/type? Three individuals have referred to her "maine
coon", "siamese" and "tabby". But none of them have their own cats and
I am not sure how much they know.

: You can cover a piece of 2" insulation with the space blanket and cover the
: space blanket with straw or hay- cats love to burrow into straw. The most
: important things are to keep the shelter dry and off the ground.

Would Fall leaves be a good substitute for hay/straw? Otherwise I can
try to find out where to get the latter (not in my usual stores). Bags
full of raked Fall leaves are available everywhere right now.

If I place the box on a layer of standard bricks, would that raise it
enough?

: You can make a warm and comfy bed for her out of a low rubbermaid storage
: bin. A low bin will retain a lot more body heat. The space blankets are
: large, so, you can line the inside of the bin to reflect even more heat.

This arrangement is only for two weeks. I am not contemplating a
permanent shelter. My long term goal still is to install cat doors and
give her access to heated spaces.

Finally, I have no way to know if she needs or will use this device.
For all I know, she may already have a warm spot next to some hot water
heater. But being unsure I want to give her to an option. Only time
will tell if she used it.

: She is sure one lucky cat to have a friend like you!

Well we are both lucky to have each other, and to have knowledgeable
and helpful friends like you. :-)

Ajanta
November 23rd 05, 05:59 AM
Gail > wrote:

: She does need a place out of the wind, cold, and precipitation. You can use
: put a cardboard box in that room, close it up, and open up and area for her
: to go in and out. You can fill it with warm, dry blankets. With adequate
: food and water, she should be OK.

I feed her everyday, so I know she counts on me for food. Incredibly, I
don't know if she needs my help with shelter. I just want to increase
her options when I am out of town.

Spot
November 23rd 05, 09:45 AM
I would take 2 cardboard boxes one quite bigger than the other. Place the
smaller inside then insulate between the two with either newspapers, straw
or styrofoam. You could place something like this inside the basement for
her to access. Line the inside with a space blanket & some old blankets or
fill it full with straw so she can snuggle into the straw. It's not heated
but at least she would be out of the wind and have someplace to snuggle into
that would be warm.

If you don't think she may go into the basement you could always place one
of these under the porch or in a back out of the way corner where the wind
isn't too bad but the basement would be better.

Celeste

"Phil P." > wrote in message
ink.net...
>
> "Ajanta" > wrote in message
> ...
>> There was some discussion here about heat reflecting pads. I have a few
>> questions: 1/ Do they work? Roughly how many degrees of extra warmth
>> would they provide? 2/ Is one brand better than others? I have seen one
>> at Petsmart, another one online at Dr Forster Smith. They all seem to
>> be around $20.
>
>> The stray I feed doesn't live with us, nor wants to as far as I can
>> tell, but knows where we are and if she showed up on a particularly
>> cold night we would certainly let her in. (Even those in our household
>> who don't want a permanent pet living inside won't object to that.)
>>
>> I am brainstorming about what I can do to increase her options when we
>> are away for the holidays, should it turn very cold.
>>
>> There is a basement-ish "room" in our building, more like a very large
>> storage closet, which is not used at present and I could leave the door
>> open a few inches with a stopper. It is not heated, nor next to a
>> heated space, and doesn't have a working electric outlet so I can't do
>> anything elaborate. However, it will provide complete protection from
>> wind, rain, and snow.
>>
>> Only problem is, it would still be cold. I was thinking of setting up a
>> chair with a cusion, if a add a heat-reflecting pad, would that be a
>> meanigful extra help?
>
> I don't think you should use any type of cloth material if you won't be
> around to change it if it gets wet. Cloth retains moisture and will draw
> body heat away from the cat if she comes in wet and lies on it. That's
> why
> I don't use cloth material in winter feral shelters.
>
> Your best bet would be Space Blankets- they're very thin mylar sheets and
> reflect
> about 80% of the cat's body heat back to the cat. Space blankets are 54"
> x
> 84" and cost about
> $2-$3 each and come in small packages:
>
> http://www.maxshouse.com/misc/spaceblankets.JPG
>
> http://www.maxshouse.com/Ours/jade_in_space.JPG
>
>
> You can cover a piece of 2" insulation with the space blanket and cover
> the
> space blanket with straw or hay- cats love to burrow into straw. The most
> important things are to keep the shelter dry and off the ground.
>
> You can make a warm and comfy bed for her out of a low rubbermaid storage
> bin. A low bin will retain a lot more body heat. The space blankets are
> large, so, you can line the inside of the bin to reflect even more heat.
>
> She is sure one lucky cat to have a friend like you!
>
> Phil
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

Phil P.
November 23rd 05, 10:02 AM
"Ajanta" > wrote in message
...
> Phil P. > wrote:
>
> : I don't think you should use any type of cloth material if you won't
> : be around to change it if it gets wet...
>
> My original thought was to (1) Use a patio chair and cushion from the
> summer (the cushion material does not seem to be cloth; she is also
> familiar with these, having used them in the summer). (2) To add a
> layer of heat reflecting blanket, something like
>
> <http://www.drsfostersmith.com/Product/Prod_Display.cfm?pcatid=8982&N=20
> 02+113876>
>
> However, from warmth point of view, it is probably better to have an
> enclosed cardboard box and line up all walls with the inexpensive space
> blanket you mention below? I could use styrofoam boards for insulation.

Here's a very simple, but effective winter shelter similar to your idea:


http://www.neighborhoodcats.org/info/wintershelter.htm


Straw or hay is much better than a blanket because they dry much more
quickly.


>
>
> Please remember there will be no wind or precipitation in this room,
> but the temperature may be what it is outdoors.


I understand the shelter will be indoors. However, if she's wet when she
comes in she'll dampen the padding. Damp padding will draw body heat out of
her. The only cloth material that *might* work is a waterproof down ski
jacket.



Too bad there is no
> functioning electric outlet, so she will have to go to elsewhere for
> water. This arrangement is only for two weeks. I am not contemplating a
> permanent shelter. My long term goal still is to install cat doors and
> give her access to heated spaces.
>
> Finally, I have no way to know if she needs or will use this device.
> For all I know, she may already have a warm spot next to some water
> heater. But being unsure I want to give her to an option. Only time
> will tell if she used it.


If she's been around for more than a week, I'd bet she knows every single
nook and cranny in the neighborhood. Still, you still might have to show
her where it is because she might not know you put a bed in the room.



>
> : Your best bet would be Space Blankets- they're very thin mylar sheets
and
> : reflect
> : about 80% of the cat's body heat back to the cat. Space blankets are
54" x
> : 84" and cost about
> : $2-$3 each and come in small packages:
> :
> : http://www.maxshouse.com/misc/spaceblankets.JPG
> :
> : http://www.maxshouse.com/Ours/jade_in_space.JPG
>
> Incredible, my cat looks just like this. Well, so do many others. :-)
> What is this breed/type?

She's a DSH- Classic Tabby. Here's a better shot with her eyes open:

http://www.maxshouse.com/Ours/Jade-11-16-04--4a.jpg


and when she was younger:

http://www.maxshouse.com/Ours/Jade-o-mine-climb.jpg


Three individuals have referred to her "maine
> coon", "siamese" and "tabby". But none of them have their own cats and
> I am not sure how much they know.
>
> : You can cover a piece of 2" insulation with the space blanket and cover
the
> : space blanket with straw or hay- cats love to burrow into straw. The
most
> : important things are to keep the shelter dry and off the ground.
>
> Would Fall leaves be a good substitute for hay/straw? Otherwise I can
> try to find out where to get the latter (not in my usual stores). Bags
> full of raked Fall leaves are available everywhere right now.


I don't think leaves would work very well. I'm sure you've seen how long
leaves take to dry- and that's outdoors where wind speeds the drying
process. If the room isn't heated, there's also a chance the wet leaves
will freeze making the shelter or bed even colder and she'll never use it
again.



>
> If I place the box on a layer of standard bricks, would that raise it
> enough?

Short 2x4s would be better since they wouldn't hold or transfer as much
cold. If you use a piece of 2" insulation on the bottom of the shelter,
bricks would work fine. Whatever you use, make sure it doesn't wobble.


>
> : You can make a warm and comfy bed for her out of a low rubbermaid
storage
> : bin. A low bin will retain a lot more body heat. The space blankets are
> : large, so, you can line the inside of the bin to reflect even more heat.
>
> This arrangement is only for two weeks. I am not contemplating a
> permanent shelter. My long term goal still is to install cat doors and
> give her access to heated spaces.

That would be ideal. For a short-term shelter in the meantime, the one I'm
describing shouldn't cost more than $10 and take about 30 minutes to make.

Again, she sure is one lucky cat!

Best of luck,

Phil

CatNipped
November 23rd 05, 02:39 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
nk.net...
>
> "Ajanta" > wrote in message
> ...
> > Phil P. > wrote:
> >
> > : I don't think you should use any type of cloth material if you won't
> > : be around to change it if it gets wet...
> >
> > My original thought was to (1) Use a patio chair and cushion from the
> > summer (the cushion material does not seem to be cloth; she is also
> > familiar with these, having used them in the summer). (2) To add a
> > layer of heat reflecting blanket, something like
> >
> > <http://www.drsfostersmith.com/Product/Prod_Display.cfm?pcatid=8982&N=20
> > 02+113876>
> >
> > However, from warmth point of view, it is probably better to have an
> > enclosed cardboard box and line up all walls with the inexpensive space
> > blanket you mention below? I could use styrofoam boards for insulation.
>
> Here's a very simple, but effective winter shelter similar to your idea:
>
>
> http://www.neighborhoodcats.org/info/wintershelter.htm
>
>
> Straw or hay is much better than a blanket because they dry much more
> quickly.

Plus, it's the "layered" effect you're looking for - just like they advise
people to wear layered clothes in severe weather. Straw or hay (or, OP,
fall leaves) trap miltiple pockets of air that act as insulation. A cat can
burrow down into it and be surrounded by that insulation to keep his/her
body heat trapped in with him/her.

Hugs,

CatNipped

> >
> > Please remember there will be no wind or precipitation in this room,
> > but the temperature may be what it is outdoors.
>
>
> I understand the shelter will be indoors. However, if she's wet when she
> comes in she'll dampen the padding. Damp padding will draw body heat out
of
> her. The only cloth material that *might* work is a waterproof down ski
> jacket.
>
>
>
> Too bad there is no
> > functioning electric outlet, so she will have to go to elsewhere for
> > water. This arrangement is only for two weeks. I am not contemplating a
> > permanent shelter. My long term goal still is to install cat doors and
> > give her access to heated spaces.
> >
> > Finally, I have no way to know if she needs or will use this device.
> > For all I know, she may already have a warm spot next to some water
> > heater. But being unsure I want to give her to an option. Only time
> > will tell if she used it.
>
>
> If she's been around for more than a week, I'd bet she knows every single
> nook and cranny in the neighborhood. Still, you still might have to show
> her where it is because she might not know you put a bed in the room.
>
>
>
> >
> > : Your best bet would be Space Blankets- they're very thin mylar sheets
> and
> > : reflect
> > : about 80% of the cat's body heat back to the cat. Space blankets are
> 54" x
> > : 84" and cost about
> > : $2-$3 each and come in small packages:
> > :
> > : http://www.maxshouse.com/misc/spaceblankets.JPG
> > :
> > : http://www.maxshouse.com/Ours/jade_in_space.JPG
> >
> > Incredible, my cat looks just like this. Well, so do many others. :-)
> > What is this breed/type?
>
> She's a DSH- Classic Tabby. Here's a better shot with her eyes open:
>
> http://www.maxshouse.com/Ours/Jade-11-16-04--4a.jpg
>
>
> and when she was younger:
>
> http://www.maxshouse.com/Ours/Jade-o-mine-climb.jpg
>
>
> Three individuals have referred to her "maine
> > coon", "siamese" and "tabby". But none of them have their own cats and
> > I am not sure how much they know.
> >
> > : You can cover a piece of 2" insulation with the space blanket and
cover
> the
> > : space blanket with straw or hay- cats love to burrow into straw. The
> most
> > : important things are to keep the shelter dry and off the ground.
> >
> > Would Fall leaves be a good substitute for hay/straw? Otherwise I can
> > try to find out where to get the latter (not in my usual stores). Bags
> > full of raked Fall leaves are available everywhere right now.
>
>
> I don't think leaves would work very well. I'm sure you've seen how long
> leaves take to dry- and that's outdoors where wind speeds the drying
> process. If the room isn't heated, there's also a chance the wet leaves
> will freeze making the shelter or bed even colder and she'll never use it
> again.
>
>
>
> >
> > If I place the box on a layer of standard bricks, would that raise it
> > enough?
>
> Short 2x4s would be better since they wouldn't hold or transfer as much
> cold. If you use a piece of 2" insulation on the bottom of the shelter,
> bricks would work fine. Whatever you use, make sure it doesn't wobble.
>
>
> >
> > : You can make a warm and comfy bed for her out of a low rubbermaid
> storage
> > : bin. A low bin will retain a lot more body heat. The space blankets
are
> > : large, so, you can line the inside of the bin to reflect even more
heat.
> >
> > This arrangement is only for two weeks. I am not contemplating a
> > permanent shelter. My long term goal still is to install cat doors and
> > give her access to heated spaces.
>
> That would be ideal. For a short-term shelter in the meantime, the one
I'm
> describing shouldn't cost more than $10 and take about 30 minutes to make.
>
> Again, she sure is one lucky cat!
>
> Best of luck,
>
> Phil
>
>
>

Tony P.
November 24th 05, 04:24 AM
In article et>,
says...
>
> "Ajanta" > wrote in message
> ...
> > There was some discussion here about heat reflecting pads. I have a few
> > questions: 1/ Do they work? Roughly how many degrees of extra warmth
> > would they provide? 2/ Is one brand better than others? I have seen one
> > at Petsmart, another one online at Dr Forster Smith. They all seem to
> > be around $20.
>
> > The stray I feed doesn't live with us, nor wants to as far as I can
> > tell, but knows where we are and if she showed up on a particularly
> > cold night we would certainly let her in. (Even those in our household
> > who don't want a permanent pet living inside won't object to that.)
> >
> > I am brainstorming about what I can do to increase her options when we
> > are away for the holidays, should it turn very cold.
> >
> > There is a basement-ish "room" in our building, more like a very large
> > storage closet, which is not used at present and I could leave the door
> > open a few inches with a stopper. It is not heated, nor next to a
> > heated space, and doesn't have a working electric outlet so I can't do
> > anything elaborate. However, it will provide complete protection from
> > wind, rain, and snow.
> >
> > Only problem is, it would still be cold. I was thinking of setting up a
> > chair with a cusion, if a add a heat-reflecting pad, would that be a
> > meanigful extra help?
>
> I don't think you should use any type of cloth material if you won't be
> around to change it if it gets wet. Cloth retains moisture and will draw
> body heat away from the cat if she comes in wet and lies on it. That's why
> I don't use cloth material in winter feral shelters.
>
> Your best bet would be Space Blankets- they're very thin mylar sheets and
> reflect
> about 80% of the cat's body heat back to the cat. Space blankets are 54" x
> 84" and cost about
> $2-$3 each and come in small packages:
>
> http://www.maxshouse.com/misc/spaceblankets.JPG
>
> http://www.maxshouse.com/Ours/jade_in_space.JPG
>
>
> You can cover a piece of 2" insulation with the space blanket and cover the
> space blanket with straw or hay- cats love to burrow into straw. The most
> important things are to keep the shelter dry and off the ground.
>
> You can make a warm and comfy bed for her out of a low rubbermaid storage
> bin. A low bin will retain a lot more body heat. The space blankets are
> large, so, you can line the inside of the bin to reflect even more heat.
>
> She is sure one lucky cat to have a friend like you!

I keep the night temps at 55F to save natural gas. But I want the cats
to be warm. I might just employ what you've suggested for them.

Reason I say this is that I have a sleeping bag with a nylon outer and
cotton/rayon inner. If I put the nylon side on top of me it's much
warmer than if I use the cottony side.

But mine are strictly indoor cats. So I'm not so concerned about them
getting wet but I want them to be warm.

Phil P.
November 24th 05, 12:54 PM
"Tony P." > wrote in message
. ..
>
> I keep the night temps at 55F to save natural gas. But I want the cats
> to be warm. I might just employ what you've suggested for them.
>
> Reason I say this is that I have a sleeping bag with a nylon outer and
> cotton/rayon inner. If I put the nylon side on top of me it's much
> warmer than if I use the cottony side.
>
> But mine are strictly indoor cats. So I'm not so concerned about them
> getting wet but I want them to be warm.


Have you ever noticed that a cat will always find the warmest spot in the
house? ;-)

Phil

Tony P.
November 25th 05, 04:45 AM
In article et>,
says...
>
> "Tony P." > wrote in message
> . ..
> >
> > I keep the night temps at 55F to save natural gas. But I want the cats
> > to be warm. I might just employ what you've suggested for them.
> >
> > Reason I say this is that I have a sleeping bag with a nylon outer and
> > cotton/rayon inner. If I put the nylon side on top of me it's much
> > warmer than if I use the cottony side.
> >
> > But mine are strictly indoor cats. So I'm not so concerned about them
> > getting wet but I want them to be warm.
>
>
> Have you ever noticed that a cat will always find the warmest spot in the
> house? ;-)
>
> Phil

Yes I have. Those warm spots also tend to be sunny spots.

carola
November 25th 05, 06:54 AM
: > Have you ever noticed that a cat will always find the warmest spot in
the
: > house? ;-)
: >
: > Phil
:
: Yes I have. Those warm spots also tend to be sunny spots.


Yes, but our long hair seems to prefer the cooler spots like the floor.


carola