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Ajanta
November 22nd 05, 07:23 PM
I am brainstorming how to assist my stray during the holidays season
when we would gone for about 10 days.

A friend is willing to come every 1-2 days and put out dry food just
outside the door.

However, I can't figure out what to do about water if the temperatures
are below freezing?

whitershadeofpale
November 22nd 05, 08:02 PM
Ajanta wrote:
> I am brainstorming how to assist my stray during the holidays season
> when we would gone for about 10 days.
>
> A friend is willing to come every 1-2 days and put out dry food just
> outside the door.
>
> However, I can't figure out what to do about water if the temperatures
> are below freezing?

don't worry, if it's below freezing there won't be any cat to even feed

-L.
November 22nd 05, 08:05 PM
Ajanta wrote:
> I am brainstorming how to assist my stray during the holidays season
> when we would gone for about 10 days.
>
> A friend is willing to come every 1-2 days and put out dry food just
> outside the door.
>
> However, I can't figure out what to do about water if the temperatures
> are below freezing?

There are heating elements you can plug in and put into the water dish
for just this reason.
Search any feed supply store, pet store or the Drs. Smith and Foster
website and you should be able to find one.
-L.

whitershadeofpale
November 22nd 05, 08:09 PM
whitershadeofpale wrote:

> don't worry, if it's below freezing there won't be any cat to even feed

just messing! I don't know how cold a cat can stand it, I figure
freezing is peaking.

do you know where the stray goes when it leaves each day?

If it hangs around, maybe there's a place where she can get warm,
I picked up a huge sturdy carboard box today...(Ill mail it to
you...lol)

You can live it in too if you need to

[email protected]____no____.com
November 22nd 05, 08:47 PM
On Tue, 22 Nov 2005 18:23:44 GMT, Ajanta > wrote:

>I am brainstorming how to assist my stray during the holidays season
>when we would gone for about 10 days.
>
>A friend is willing to come every 1-2 days and put out dry food just
>outside the door.
>
>However, I can't figure out what to do about water if the temperatures
>are below freezing?

As always, I can see that a person can not get any help on this
newsgroup, only sarcastic remarks from a bunch of people who think
their **** is better than everyone elses.

So, here is some actual help.
I am a farmer and have barn cats, so I know all about this.

You can buy heated pet bowls at pet stores and farm supply stores.
They are around $20. It's a bowl with a cord on it. Just plug it in
and fill with water. The heating element is built into the bowl.
They draw about 40 watts so they wont run your electric bill way up.
I recommend the larger ones intended for dogs, rather than the smaller
cat ones, especially if there is more than one cat. The bigger ones
dont get tipped...

You should provide shelter for the cats. Use a dog house, wooden box,
even a cardboard box (but cardboard dont last long). Better yet, if
you have a shed or garage, put a cat door on it. Cats do not need to
live in a heated house. They grow fur according to the weather if
they live outdoors. You DO NOT want to toss an indoor cat outdoors in
winter because they did not grow a winter coat, but if they live
outdoors all the time, they do just fine as long as they have shelter
food and water.

It's nice to put old blankets or any clothing in their shelters. Be
sure to point the entrance of the shelter to the south-east. The
winds from the north and west are the ones that are the strongest and
coldest. Farmers always point their livestock shelters to the
south-east too.

On the most severe days of winter, I like to put an old heating pad
under the blankets. Plug it in, and turn it on low. I used to cage
the cats and bring them in the house during the severe cold, but found
that they quickly adapt to the heat and then they find it difficult to
go back outdoors. I can not permanemtly keep cats in the house, due
to allergies, which is why I caged them to keep them confined to one
part of the house. But I now find it's better they just stay
outdoors. One advantage for barn cats, they have livestock to keep
them warm, and often find them sitting on the backs of cattle and
horses.

Thanks for caring for the strays.

This message out to give all the goodie-goodie flamers something to
flame..... My plonk button is ready !!!!

Phil P.
November 22nd 05, 09:16 PM
"Ajanta" > wrote in message
...
> I am brainstorming how to assist my stray during the holidays season
> when we would gone for about 10 days.
>
> A friend is willing to come every 1-2 days and put out dry food just
> outside the door.
>
> However, I can't figure out what to do about water if the temperatures
> are below freezing?

Try a heated water bowl- some are thermostatically controlled to go on only
when the temp drops below 40F. http://tinyurl.com/8wltb

Just remember, heated water evaporates much more quickly in cold temps, so
be sure to get a large bowl- at least 1- 1.5 gallon.

Phil

cybercat
November 22nd 05, 09:33 PM
Tom Smith wrote:
>
> You can buy heated pet bowls at pet stores and farm supply stores.
> They are around $20. It's a bowl with a cord on it. Just plug it in
> and fill with water. The heating element is built into the bowl.
> They draw about 40 watts so they wont run your electric bill way up.
> I recommend the larger ones intended for dogs, rather than the smaller
> cat ones, especially if there is more than one cat. The bigger ones
> dont get tipped...

This sounds like a great idea, and much safer than the bowls with
exposed heating elements. I wonder if there are any battery-powered
ones for places without electrical outlets?

Karin Gillette
November 22nd 05, 09:41 PM
Tom has a good point. Where does the cat go at night? If it doesn't get
below freezing for long periods then the water should thaw enough for them
to get a drink during the day. We have chickens and put out a big water and
it melts some most days if the temp doesn't stay below freezing 24/7. Not
sure where you are at.

Also as long as they have been outdoor cats they have figured out a place to
sleep that is protected. I too would advise more than a cardboard box. If
the wind normally blows from one direction I would definitely put it
somewhere away from the direct wind.


"Ajanta" > wrote in message
...
> I am brainstorming how to assist my stray during the holidays season
> when we would gone for about 10 days.
>
> A friend is willing to come every 1-2 days and put out dry food just
> outside the door.
>
> However, I can't figure out what to do about water if the temperatures
> are below freezing?

Upscale
November 22nd 05, 10:43 PM
> wrote in message
> outdoors. One advantage for barn cats, they have livestock to keep
> them warm, and often find them sitting on the backs of cattle and
> horses.

I've love to see a picture or two of that.

Willow
November 22nd 05, 10:53 PM
I don't have pictures.. but I've seen it in my Dad's barn.. cutest thing
too..

--
Will~

"... so that's how liberty ends, in a round of applause."

Queen Amidala, The revenge of the Syth.


"Upscale" > wrote in message
...
> > wrote in message
> > outdoors. One advantage for barn cats, they have livestock to keep
> > them warm, and often find them sitting on the backs of cattle and
> > horses.
>
> I've love to see a picture or two of that.
>
>

Snittens
November 22nd 05, 10:54 PM
> wrote
> As always, I can see that a person can not get any help on this
> newsgroup, only sarcastic remarks from a bunch of people who think
> their **** is better than everyone elses.

Huh? I didn't see any sarcastic remarks.

When I was trying to trap my cat that got out, I used those microwavable
discs from Fosters & Smith. Those might keep water from freezing, if you
set a bowl on top. They need to be reheated every twelve hours.
--
-Kelly

whitershadeofpale
November 22nd 05, 11:00 PM
wrote:
> snip...One advantage for barn cats, they have livestock to keep
> them warm, and often find them sitting on the backs of cattle and
> horses.
>
> Thanks for caring for the strays.
>
> This message out to give all the goodie-goodie flamers something to
> flame..... My plonk button is ready !!!!


exactly how cold you reckon a cat can stand it

i gave her my honest opinion yo! I was the only who posted when you
made your post.

Soooo....

Zaire's sno way eh khat will live in freezing temperatchures.

vet of cooors he can findz a hol to heat but dham
chez vworry ah freezing watear, Im, Vwat aabout
thawing out the khat.

DW
November 22nd 05, 11:28 PM
whitershadeofpale wrote:
> don't worry, if it's below freezing there won't be any cat to even feed
Wrong. That cat is still around despite the freezing temeperatures.

Look outside in the middle of February after a blizzard. You'll see
lots
of cat tracks in the snow. The cat is still around, it's probably
hiding
under the hood of a car (on a warm engine), in your garage, over a
heating grate, etc. Just like homeless humans, homeless cats don't
just disappear when the weather gets cold.

DW
November 22nd 05, 11:36 PM
One thing I would point out about strays. It is dangerous for cats to
be outside when the temperature gets below zero and the winds kick
up (especially when you have a wind chill of 60 below zero).

At a minimum they need shelter from a biting howling wind out of the
North (a Montreal Express).

whitershadeofpale
November 22nd 05, 11:36 PM
DW wrote:

> under the hood of a car (on a warm engine), in your garage, over a
> heating grate, etc. Just like homeless humans, homeless cats don't
> just disappear when the weather gets cold.

no...what you see are the survivors what you don't see are the cats
hunkered
down and frozen under some dank bitter cold house.

You wouldn't see that

could you live under a house in freezing temps...yeah for a couple of
days

why are we having this conversation

Spot
November 23rd 05, 12:07 AM
You can buy at pet supply stores heated water bowls. I don't know what kind
of temperatures you are talking here so I'm not sure it if would stay
completely thawed. You would still have to have someone top off the water
every day or so but at least it wouldn't freeze solid.

Celeste


"Ajanta" > wrote in message
...
>I am brainstorming how to assist my stray during the holidays season
> when we would gone for about 10 days.
>
> A friend is willing to come every 1-2 days and put out dry food just
> outside the door.
>
> However, I can't figure out what to do about water if the temperatures
> are below freezing?

Spot
November 23rd 05, 12:07 AM
We had an old duck years ago who decided it was bunking with the collie dog
for the winter. We would go to feed the dog and find the duck snuggled up
right beside it in the box.

Celeste

"Willow" > wrote in message
. net...
>I don't have pictures.. but I've seen it in my Dad's barn.. cutest thing
> too..
>
> --
> Will~
>
> "... so that's how liberty ends, in a round of applause."
>
> Queen Amidala, The revenge of the Syth.
>
>
> "Upscale" > wrote in message
> ...
>> > wrote in message
>> > outdoors. One advantage for barn cats, they have livestock to keep
>> > them warm, and often find them sitting on the backs of cattle and
>> > horses.
>>
>> I've love to see a picture or two of that.
>>
>>
>
>

DW
November 23rd 05, 12:11 AM
whitershadeofpale wrote:
> exactly how cold you reckon a cat can stand it
Around here when it gets into the single numbers or
below zero they warn people to keep their pets
inside.

When it gets below zero exposed flesh on a
person can suffer frostbite in a matter of
seconds. I would assume the same for your cat.

DW
November 23rd 05, 12:19 AM
Karin Gillette wrote:
> Tom has a good point. Where does the cat go at night? If it doesn't get
> below freezing for long periods then the water should thaw enough for them
> to get a drink during the day.
It should be pointed out around here it can and does go below freezing
as early as the middle of November and sometimes will stay below
freezing for
4-12 weeks.

Last year we had close to two months where it never went above
ten degrees during the day.

[it was bad news for our cats but it is good news for our
Super Bowl winning Patriots.....you know what.....somehow that
label never gets old.]

whayface
November 23rd 05, 01:14 AM
On Tue, 22 Nov 2005 18:23:44 GMT, Ajanta > wrote:

>I am brainstorming how to assist my stray during the holidays season
>when we would gone for about 10 days.
>
>A friend is willing to come every 1-2 days and put out dry food just
>outside the door.
>
>However, I can't figure out what to do about water if the temperatures
>are below freezing?


There are electric heated water container for outdoor use that you can buy. Tractor
Supply Corporation sells them in Michigan USA. I have one plugged in under porch along
with a pile of dryed leaves, an old pillow and a comforter so the strays can pick what to
sleep on. I also keep a container of dry food at all times plus a can of wet food daily
during the day when it is warm enough so it does not freeze.

Only problem is that during the coldest winter months the canned food freezes and the
birds find the dry food and pig out on so it is kind of hard to keep food out for the
cats!!

[email protected]____no____.com
November 23rd 05, 02:16 AM
On 22 Nov 2005 21:33:55 +0100, "cybercat" > wrote:

>
>Tom Smith wrote:
>>
>> You can buy heated pet bowls at pet stores and farm supply stores.
>> They are around $20. It's a bowl with a cord on it. Just plug it in
>> and fill with water. The heating element is built into the bowl.
>> They draw about 40 watts so they wont run your electric bill way up.
>> I recommend the larger ones intended for dogs, rather than the smaller
>> cat ones, especially if there is more than one cat. The bigger ones
>> dont get tipped...
>
>This sounds like a great idea, and much safer than the bowls with
>exposed heating elements. I wonder if there are any battery-powered
>ones for places without electrical outlets?
>
>

Here's some info....

You can order the heated bowls online from ValleyVet.com

Here is the direct link to the bowls (below)
I have this first one on the list.
It's on sale right now for $19.95 and free shipping.
Durable, works well, and dont tip over
They are 50 watt.

http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=2e87c291-7b6a-11d5-a192-00b0d0204ae5

Here's another one. Similar but stainless steel and costs more. I
think plastic is better since steel will lose heat faster, sitting on
the cold ground.

http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=30e07c1a-7b6a-11d5-a192-00b0d0204ae5

I am not advertising for Valley Vet, but I have been a satisfied
customer. Just dont get on their email list unless you want ads
almost daily. They did remove my email address without any hassle
though. They ship quickly and have lots of other goods.

PS. They make smaller versions of these heated bowls but they are too
small if you ask me. They also make large ones (more like pails) for
horses.

No, I dont think you can get battery operated ones. Anything that
heats with electricity needs alot of power. You'd be changing
batteries several times a day.

Cost to operate: Running it 24 hours a day uses 1.2 KWH
If your electric cost per KWH is 10 cents (sort of an average), it
will cost you 12 cents a day to run this thing. ($3.60 per month).

I wish my livestock tanks were that cheap, they cost me 15 cents per
HOUR per heater and I run 6 of them, which would cost $21.60 per day
to run them all. (except I get an agriculture rate for electric, but
its still about $15 a day). Those January electric bills are a
killer.

Tom

cybercat
November 23rd 05, 03:13 AM
> wrote in message
...
> On 22 Nov 2005 21:33:55 +0100, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
> Here's some info....
>
> You can order the heated bowls online from ValleyVet.com
>
> Here is the direct link to the bowls (below)
> I have this first one on the list.
> It's on sale right now for $19.95 and free shipping.
> Durable, works well, and dont tip over
> They are 50 watt.
>
>
http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=2e87c291-7b6a-11d5-a192-00b0d0204ae5
>
> Here's another one. Similar but stainless steel and costs more. I
> think plastic is better since steel will lose heat faster, sitting on
> the cold ground.
>
>
http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=30e07c1a-7b6a-11d5-a192-00b0d0204ae5
>

Good to know, Tom. I bookmarked the web site.

>
> I wish my livestock tanks were that cheap, they cost me 15 cents per
> HOUR per heater and I run 6 of them, which would cost $21.60 per day
> to run them all. (except I get an agriculture rate for electric, but
> its still about $15 a day). Those January electric bills are a
> killer.
>

Do you have barn cats? I am just curious.

carola
November 23rd 05, 03:21 AM
"Spot" > schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:4xNgf.9337$%[email protected]
: We had an old duck years ago who decided it was bunking with the collie
dog
: for the winter. We would go to feed the dog and find the duck snuggled up
: right beside it in the box.
:
: Celeste


I had a dwarf rabbit that loved to sit on the Shetland pony's back in
winter.
He climbed up on the hay rack and then jumped. The pony didn't mind at all.
The other rabbit ate the tail ...


carola

carola
November 23rd 05, 03:31 AM
"Phil P." > schrieb im Newsbeitrag
nk.net...
:
: "Ajanta" > wrote in message
: ...
: > I am brainstorming how to assist my stray during the holidays season
: > when we would gone for about 10 days.
: >
: > A friend is willing to come every 1-2 days and put out dry food just
: > outside the door.
: >
: > However, I can't figure out what to do about water if the temperatures
: > are below freezing?
:
: Try a heated water bowl- some are thermostatically controlled to go on
only
: when the temp drops below 40F. http://tinyurl.com/8wltb
:
: Just remember, heated water evaporates much more quickly in cold temps, so
: be sure to get a large bowl- at least 1- 1.5 gallon.
:
: Phil
:


The easiest thing would be to fill the bowl with lukewarm water, and of
course to remove the ice every day.
You might need a second bowl if the ice gets too thick.
Don't use plastic, it bursts. I use old pans for my outdoor rabbits. And of
course I put them into the sun.


carola

[email protected]____no____.com
November 23rd 05, 05:04 AM
On 23 Nov 2005 03:13:20 +0100, "cybercat" > wrote:

>
> wrote in message
...
>> On 22 Nov 2005 21:33:55 +0100, "cybercat" > wrote:
>>
>> Here's some info....
>>
>> You can order the heated bowls online from ValleyVet.com
>>
>> Here is the direct link to the bowls (below)
>> I have this first one on the list.
>> It's on sale right now for $19.95 and free shipping.
>> Durable, works well, and dont tip over
>> They are 50 watt.
>>
>>
>http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=2e87c291-7b6a-11d5-a192-00b0d0204ae5
>>
>> Here's another one. Similar but stainless steel and costs more. I
>> think plastic is better since steel will lose heat faster, sitting on
>> the cold ground.
>>
>>
>http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_detail.html?pgguid=30e07c1a-7b6a-11d5-a192-00b0d0204ae5
>>
>
>Good to know, Tom. I bookmarked the web site.
>
>>
>> I wish my livestock tanks were that cheap, they cost me 15 cents per
>> HOUR per heater and I run 6 of them, which would cost $21.60 per day
>> to run them all. (except I get an agriculture rate for electric, but
>> its still about $15 a day). Those January electric bills are a
>> killer.
>>
>
>Do you have barn cats? I am just curious.
>

Yes, 11 barn cats who are fed cat food each day and still prefer
eating pelletized horse feed, (with the horses), and even whole oats.
I dont understand that, but if they like it, let them eat it... The
horses dont seem to mind, except one pony that I have seen pin his
ears and chase the cats. (they avoid him now). The cats are always
watered and in severe cold they get the their choice of an igloo dog
house with straw on the floor, the hay shed, or in the barn with the
horses and cattle. I will have to get some pics of the cats sitting on
horses. The cattle are not as tolerant of them.

By the way, cats can stay quite warm in hay sheds. They crawl into
gaps between the bales. Of course not everyone has a hayshed.

Valley Vet has almost everything for animals, and are easy to work
with too.

Tom

Ajanta
November 23rd 05, 06:28 AM
Karin Gillette > wrote:

: Tom has a good point. Where does the cat go at night?

I feed her everyday, so she relies on me and I must arrange for her
food and water.

As for shelter, she lives in 7-8 interconnected backyards and I have
not been able to figure out where she goes once she leaves my home. She
could have spots in basements, sheds etc. But then they may not be warm
enough, or her path could be blocked in a snow storm. So, lacking
precise information, I want to rig up an option for her while I am
away.

Unfortunately, the best spot for this shelter, which is protected from
winds, rain etc., has no functioning electrical outlet. So I have to
separate her shelter from her food and water station, but that is a
small detail compared to making sure she has all essentials somewhere.

: If it doesn't get below freezing for long periods then the water should
: thaw enough for them to get a drink during the day...

When I am here, I look at the day and react accordingly. However, this
planning is for Christmas - New Year when I don't know what weather
will be like and I'll be out of town.

So, I hope for the best and plan for the worst. :-)

Ajanta
November 23rd 05, 06:39 AM
> wrote:

: As always, I can see that a person can not get any help on this
: newsgroup, only sarcastic remarks...

As an old user of ng's I know they have always been like that. Good
thing is, it is pretty easy to filter out the noise and focus on good
informative posts. Yours is certainly one of the most helpful. Thank
you for all the info in this post as well as in others.

I will definitely get a water bowl and rig up a temprary shelter in my
absence. When I return I intend to instal cat doors and give her access
to my heated apartment when she desires it.

I don't have a barn but can see why that would be a better solution for
you as well as for the animals. Your anecdotes of cats with horses,
ponies, and cattle are wonderful, it would be good to see the pics
whenever you can get them.

: You can buy heated pet bowls at pet stores and farm supply stores.
: They are around $20. It's a bowl with a cord on it. Just plug it in
: and fill with water. The heating element is built into the bowl.
: They draw about 40 watts so they wont run your electric bill way up.
: I recommend the larger ones intended for dogs, rather than the smaller
: cat ones, especially if there is more than one cat. The bigger ones
: dont get tipped...
:
: You should provide shelter for the cats. Use a dog house, wooden box,
: even a cardboard box (but cardboard dont last long). Better yet, if
: you have a shed or garage, put a cat door on it. Cats do not need to
: live in a heated house. They grow fur according to the weather if
: they live outdoors. You DO NOT want to toss an indoor cat outdoors in
: winter because they did not grow a winter coat, but if they live
: outdoors all the time, they do just fine as long as they have shelter
: food and water.
:
: It's nice to put old blankets or any clothing in their shelters. Be
: sure to point the entrance of the shelter to the south-east. The
: winds from the north and west are the ones that are the strongest and
: coldest. Farmers always point their livestock shelters to the
: south-east too.
:
: On the most severe days of winter, I like to put an old heating pad
: under the blankets. Plug it in, and turn it on low. I used to cage
: the cats and bring them in the house during the severe cold, but found
: that they quickly adapt to the heat and then they find it difficult to
: go back outdoors. I can not permanemtly keep cats in the house, due
: to allergies, which is why I caged them to keep them confined to one
: part of the house. But I now find it's better they just stay
: outdoors. One advantage for barn cats, they have livestock to keep
: them warm, and often find them sitting on the backs of cattle and
: horses.
:
: Thanks for caring for the strays.
:
: This message out to give all the goodie-goodie flamers something to
: flame..... My plonk button is ready !!!!

Upscale
November 23rd 05, 11:34 AM
"Spot" > wrote in message
> We had an old duck years ago who decided it was bunking with the collie
dog
> for the winter. We would go to feed the dog and find the duck snuggled up
> right beside it in the box.

For anyone interested, I've just posted a picture to alt.binaries.test of an
ape cuddling a cat.

[email protected]____no____.com
November 23rd 05, 02:25 PM
On Wed, 23 Nov 2005 05:39:59 GMT, Ajanta > wrote:

>
>As an old user of ng's I know they have always been like that. Good
>thing is, it is pretty easy to filter out the noise and focus on good
>informative posts. Yours is certainly one of the most helpful. Thank
>you for all the info in this post as well as in others.
>
You are very welcome. I do filter out the junk. Like you said, NGs
in general can be difficult. I have used them for years too. For
some reason the pet related groups seem to be some of the worse
though. The computer repair groups have the least troubles. ????

>I will definitely get a water bowl and rig up a temprary shelter in my
>absence. When I return I intend to instal cat doors and give her access
>to my heated apartment when she desires it.

Sounds good. Thats a good deal on those bowls at Valley vet since the
shipping is free. But maybe you can find one locally too. If you are
worried about getting it in time from V.V. I usually get my orders in
2 to 3 days.
I noticed in another post you said you dont have electric nearby.
Because this is a 50 watt device (low power load), you could run a 100
foot extension cord and still have enough power left to decorate the
cat house with christmas lites. :)
I have to often do things like this on the farm. I try to string the
cords thru trees if I can. Otherwise lay it one the ground, put duct
tape around the connecttion and place a board under it, and a welcome
mat on top plus a few rocks for weight.

>
>I don't have a barn but can see why that would be a better solution for
>you as well as for the animals. Your anecdotes of cats with horses,
>ponies, and cattle are wonderful, it would be good to see the pics
>whenever you can get them.
>

Its amazing how much heat livestock put out. I tend to seal the barn
as best I can in winter. It gets a little smelly, but they stay warm.
The cats know where the horses are and they get along well. One horse
loves cats and likes to lick them and play with them. She did have to
learn a lesson when I first got her and she thought a cats tail was
something to groom with her teeth (horses groom other horses that
way). Well, the cat was not impressed and clawed her nose. That
didnt happen again. The same horse decided to do the same to my arm
too. I let out a yell and that stopped real quick. (She's a young
horse.)

I will see what I can do for pictures.

Time to feed the herd.

Tom

Brigitte
November 23rd 05, 04:26 PM
"Snittens" > wrote in message
...
> > wrote
> > As always, I can see that a person can not get any help on this
> > newsgroup, only sarcastic remarks from a bunch of people who think
> > their **** is better than everyone elses.
>
> Huh? I didn't see any sarcastic remarks.

I didn't see it either. Perhaps we have the culprit killfiled. :)

Brigitte

carola
November 23rd 05, 04:53 PM
: >As an old user of ng's I know they have always been like that. Good
: >thing is, it is pretty easy to filter out the noise and focus on good
: >informative posts. Yours is certainly one of the most helpful. Thank
: >you for all the info in this post as well as in others.
: >
: You are very welcome. I do filter out the junk. Like you said, NGs
: in general can be difficult. I have used them for years too. For
: some reason the pet related groups seem to be some of the worse
: though. The computer repair groups have the least troubles. ????



OK ... but their language is double Dutch at times ...



carola

Willow
November 23rd 05, 05:05 PM
It depends what kind of cold you're talking about..

Back home (in Quebec) boiling water freeze over in about an hour.. if even
that much..

--
Will~

"... so that's how liberty ends, in a round of applause."

Queen Amidala, The revenge of the Syth.


"carola" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Phil P." > schrieb im Newsbeitrag
> nk.net...
> :
> : "Ajanta" > wrote in message
> : ...
> : > I am brainstorming how to assist my stray during the holidays season
> : > when we would gone for about 10 days.
> : >
> : > A friend is willing to come every 1-2 days and put out dry food just
> : > outside the door.
> : >
> : > However, I can't figure out what to do about water if the temperatures
> : > are below freezing?
> :
> : Try a heated water bowl- some are thermostatically controlled to go on
> only
> : when the temp drops below 40F. http://tinyurl.com/8wltb
> :
> : Just remember, heated water evaporates much more quickly in cold temps,
so
> : be sure to get a large bowl- at least 1- 1.5 gallon.
> :
> : Phil
> :
>
>
> The easiest thing would be to fill the bowl with lukewarm water, and of
> course to remove the ice every day.
> You might need a second bowl if the ice gets too thick.
> Don't use plastic, it bursts. I use old pans for my outdoor rabbits. And
of
> course I put them into the sun.
>
>
> carola
>
>

No More Retail
November 23rd 05, 06:21 PM
http://www.aspca.org/site/PageServer?pagename=pets_coldweathertips

Kiran
November 23rd 05, 09:31 PM
: Thats a good deal on those bowls at Valley vet since the shipping
: is free.

Shipping at valley vet is free only if your order totals $50+. Maybe
old established customers get a special deal?

BTW, if you filled that bowl and kept it plugged, how long would
it be before all water evaporated?

KG
November 24th 05, 12:41 AM
It doesn't usually get that cold were I am at but I have an old plastic dog
house like the big gray ones you can get at wal-mart.

I cut a piece of wood the same size as the floor and put 1 inch tall dowel
rods in all 4 corners. then I cut another piece of wood from a peg board an
mounted on top of that. Inside it I coiled one of those heat tapes for
pipes.

It keeps it just warm enough for pets outdoors. I put a small bowl of food
and water in there. It hasn't gotten cold enough for me to tell yet if the
water will freeze in there or not. But cats love it. :)


"whitershadeofpale" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Ajanta wrote:
>> I am brainstorming how to assist my stray during the holidays season
>> when we would gone for about 10 days.
>>
>> A friend is willing to come every 1-2 days and put out dry food just
>> outside the door.
>>
>> However, I can't figure out what to do about water if the temperatures
>> are below freezing?
>
> don't worry, if it's below freezing there won't be any cat to even feed
>

whitershadeofpale
November 24th 05, 01:05 AM
KG wrote:

>Inside it I coiled one of those heat tapes for
> pipes.

That's a good idea.

J King
November 24th 05, 01:22 AM
Check out this site.

http://www.pacthumanesociety.org/core/WinterShelter.htm

Nothing there about water but some great ideas for strays.

Joanne


"Ajanta" > wrote in message
...
>I am brainstorming how to assist my stray during the holidays season
> when we would gone for about 10 days.
>
> A friend is willing to come every 1-2 days and put out dry food just
> outside the door.
>
> However, I can't figure out what to do about water if the temperatures
> are below freezing?

KG
November 24th 05, 01:53 AM
Actually my dad thought of it. They don't get very hot but do put out enough
to give them some warmth. The holes in the peg board let the heat through to
them as it rises.

All 4 of them get up in there and cuddle up. Looks like a mass of tribbles
from star trek.

"whitershadeofpale" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> KG wrote:
>
>>Inside it I coiled one of those heat tapes for
>> pipes.
>
> That's a good idea.
>

rpl
November 24th 05, 03:29 AM
re: the "wet cat" problem... disposable diapers ?... you'd have to cut
the elastic off of course to flatten it out, but that on top of one of
those heat-reflective blankets might work...


I'd do it just for the looks I'd get when I brought a box of Pampers to
the cashier "for my cat".


pat

[email protected]____no____.com
November 24th 05, 05:01 AM
On Wed, 23 Nov 2005 20:31:06 GMT, Kiran > wrote:

>: Thats a good deal on those bowls at Valley vet since the shipping
>: is free.
>
>Shipping at valley vet is free only if your order totals $50+. Maybe
>old established customers get a special deal?

The ad for that bowl said free shipping, but you might be correct. My
orders are always well over $50

>
>BTW, if you filled that bowl and kept it plugged, how long would
>it be before all water evaporated?

I have never had it evaporate that I know of (since the cats drink it,
it's hard to know). I check it daily and generally fill it every
other day in winter since the cats tend to drink out of livestock
tanks too. The water does not get "HOT", it just keeps it from
freezing. On the coldest nights it gets a little skin of ice but the
cats can still drink. Thats whem I fill it with hot tap water to help
keep it thawed. Even my livestock tanks get a skin of ice at those
times, and they have 1500 watts of power inside. But a skin is better
than frozen solid. 100 gallons of soild ice really sucks, and it has
happened when a breaker blew or something gets unplugged. One horse
things it's fun to take the heater out of the water. That really
ticks me off.

Tom

whitershadeofpale
November 24th 05, 07:26 AM
wrote:

>Thats whem I fill it with hot tap water to help
> keep it thawed.
> Tom

you know hot water freezes faster than cold

Sounds like you have a full life going on there.
I would really like to have some cattle and horses.

A friend and me was talking while driving.
She goes on about condos and big city living...
just then, we pass a beautiful ranch...complete with
horses and cattle...fences and barns...

All the talk about city life went right out the window!

You can always eat when you have a farm. You can always make money
when you have land. Fresh veggies, fresh eggs, bacon, ...

edie humperdink
November 24th 05, 08:34 AM
don't worry, cats can chew on ice. how do you think cougars survive in
the mountains?

November 25th 05, 06:20 PM
In alt.pets.cats Ajanta > wrote:
> I am brainstorming how to assist my stray during the holidays season
> when we would gone for about 10 days.

> A friend is willing to come every 1-2 days and put out dry food just
> outside the door.

> However, I can't figure out what to do about water if the temperatures
> are below freezing?

For years my mother had a large dog kennel... no dog... but it provided
a welcome refuge for cats. When the latest member joined the household
he was found perching on top of the kennel, but during the summer he
would run into the kennel but turn around waiting his food,
almost as if he were on an army parade ground.

He has a slight infection which he keeps scratching at, but the vet
said it should stop soon especially after an injection that he
administered. We asked if his (the cat's not the vet's) claws
should be trimmed and he said there was no reason unless the cat
was damaging the furniture.

Axel

Sara
November 27th 05, 01:21 AM
Garden centers sometimes sell a device called a "bird bath warmer" that
will keep water in the bird bath from freezing. I use one of those - I
have an old bird bath bowl that I put directly on the ground in the
garden. The warmer plugs into your house current and I think it draws
about as much power as a night light.

For shelters, I use a "box within a box." The outer box is an
inexpensive plastic storage box that you can get at any discount store.
Inside is a cardboard box. I put styrofoam panels between the boxes
for an insulating layer, and put straw or hay in the inner box. Of
course you need to cut holes for kitty to get in and out! Put them on
the long side, at an end, so kitty can scrunch down in the protected
part. I put my kitty shelters under my deck, oriented so the wind
can't get in. Hope this helps.

Beth M.
November 27th 05, 07:32 PM
www.drsfostersmith.com has the before mentioned bird bath warmer, they also
sell a dog bowl for water that plugs in so it does not freeze