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Cat Protector
November 25th 05, 04:47 AM
I know this is a topic that keeps popping up over and over again but it just
goes to you that even during the holidays people still think about declawing
their cats. Tonight at Thanksgiving dinner I was shocked to learn that a
couple of guests (they are a married couple) who I had known for years
actually have their cats declawed because they don't like their furniture
being scratched up. When I started on the don't declaw cat side, one of them
said they didn't want to get into this discussion.
I have discovered that those who have no problem with declawing a cat never
want to discuss it.
I pretty much had to hold it in so Thanksgiving dinner wouldn't be ruined
for everyone but I am amazed how people you think you know, you really don't
know. It seems that those who declaw cats really don't want to know about
the facts that state declawing is wrong and how it hurts the cat.

This seems to be why we have such wars on here about declawing. I would
never declaw a cat because furniture can be replaced and if you take simple
steps like teaching them to use a scratching post (and praising them for
doing so) as well clipping their claws and giving a firm NO (or squirting
them with water) when scratching in areas that declawing would not be
needed. I think those who declaw don't want to know the truth or simply
can't handle it. I am proud of being on the side that doesn't declaw. Cats
don't deserve such punishment. They are beautiful and wonderful creatures
and should not be harmed. Those who declaw, let's face it are comitting
animal cruelty and don't even realize it because in their mind it isn't
wrong. When will these people learn? Declawing is wrong no matter how you
slice it. Declawing a cat also results in behavioral problems with the
animal and they also have health problems as well. A declawed cat also loses
one of their main defensive mechanisms should they ever get outside.

Many animal rescue groups often speak out against declawing but it seems
many don't listen. I have yet to meet that one human believes in declawing
but that is willing to go through the procedure themselves (or one similar).
I doubt I ever will. I think those who declaw cats are nothing but cowards.
It is easy to hide behind ignorance when putting their cat through the
procedure but have they ever asked their cats if it is ok? How would humans
feel if cats just scheduled an appointment for them to have important body
parts removed so their home or furniture wouldn't be ruined? I doubt a human
would find that cool. So, for those considering declawing, read the facts.
There are so many non-harmful treatments you can try to curb bad behavior
and best of all it'd be cheaper. Enough said.

--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com

No More Retail
November 25th 05, 04:54 AM
you can tell a person's real face by how they treat their pets
"Cat Protector" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I know this is a topic that keeps popping up over and over again but it
>just goes to you that even during the holidays people still think about
>declawing their cats. Tonight at Thanksgiving dinner I was shocked to learn
>that a couple of guests (they are a married couple) who I had known for
>years actually have their cats declawed because they don't like their
>furniture being scratched up. When I started on the don't declaw cat side,
>one of them said they didn't want to get into this discussion.
> I have discovered that those who have no problem with declawing a cat
> never want to discuss it.
> I pretty much had to hold it in so Thanksgiving dinner wouldn't be ruined
> for everyone but I am amazed how people you think you know, you really
> don't know. It seems that those who declaw cats really don't want to know
> about the facts that state declawing is wrong and how it hurts the cat.
>
> This seems to be why we have such wars on here about declawing. I would
> never declaw a cat because furniture can be replaced and if you take
> simple steps like teaching them to use a scratching post (and praising
> them for doing so) as well clipping their claws and giving a firm NO (or
> squirting them with water) when scratching in areas that declawing would
> not be needed. I think those who declaw don't want to know the truth or
> simply can't handle it. I am proud of being on the side that doesn't
> declaw. Cats don't deserve such punishment. They are beautiful and
> wonderful creatures and should not be harmed. Those who declaw, let's face
> it are comitting animal cruelty and don't even realize it because in their
> mind it isn't wrong. When will these people learn? Declawing is wrong no
> matter how you slice it. Declawing a cat also results in behavioral
> problems with the animal and they also have health problems as well. A
> declawed cat also loses one of their main defensive mechanisms should they
> ever get outside.
>
> Many animal rescue groups often speak out against declawing but it seems
> many don't listen. I have yet to meet that one human believes in declawing
> but that is willing to go through the procedure themselves (or one
> similar). I doubt I ever will. I think those who declaw cats are nothing
> but cowards. It is easy to hide behind ignorance when putting their cat
> through the procedure but have they ever asked their cats if it is ok? How
> would humans feel if cats just scheduled an appointment for them to have
> important body parts removed so their home or furniture wouldn't be
> ruined? I doubt a human would find that cool. So, for those considering
> declawing, read the facts. There are so many non-harmful treatments you
> can try to curb bad behavior and best of all it'd be cheaper. Enough said.
>
> --
> Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
> www.catgalaxymedia.com
>
> Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
> www.panthertekit.com
>

Snittens
November 25th 05, 05:05 AM
"Cat Protector" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I know this is a topic that keeps popping up over and over again but it
>just goes to you that even during the holidays people still think about
>declawing their cats. Tonight at Thanksgiving dinner I was shocked to learn
>that a couple of guests (they are a married couple) who I had known for
>years actually have their cats declawed because they don't like their
>furniture being scratched up. When I started on the don't declaw cat side,
>one of them said they didn't want to get into this discussion.
> I have discovered that those who have no problem with declawing a cat
> never want to discuss it.

<snip>

Honestly, I don't understand why people care about their furniture so damn
much. It's just stuff. I never buy expensive furniture so that way I don't
get upset if it gets ruined. If the cats scratch it or it gets stained,
hey, that's what slipcovers are for.
People want to stay uninformed so that way they don't have to feel guilty.
After I learned the truth about declawing, which I have to give credit to
this group for, I felt awful. I let Dash get declawed when I was a teenager
and I had no idea what it really was. I also blame vets for not telling
their clients the truth.

-Kelly

Cat Protector
November 25th 05, 05:32 AM
Well the worst part about this was because it was Thanksgiving dinner you
can't make a scene. I was floored when she said she was taking their newest
cat to get declawed. When I asked why she would do it and that declawing was
wrong she didn't want to get into it. I got up and left and pretty much have
nothing to say to these people anymore.

--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com
"Snittens" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Cat Protector" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>I know this is a topic that keeps popping up over and over again but it
>>just goes to you that even during the holidays people still think about
>>declawing their cats. Tonight at Thanksgiving dinner I was shocked to
>>learn that a couple of guests (they are a married couple) who I had known
>>for years actually have their cats declawed because they don't like their
>>furniture being scratched up. When I started on the don't declaw cat side,
>>one of them said they didn't want to get into this discussion.
>> I have discovered that those who have no problem with declawing a cat
>> never want to discuss it.
>
> <snip>
>
> Honestly, I don't understand why people care about their furniture so damn
> much. It's just stuff. I never buy expensive furniture so that way I
> don't get upset if it gets ruined. If the cats scratch it or it gets
> stained, hey, that's what slipcovers are for.
> People want to stay uninformed so that way they don't have to feel guilty.
> After I learned the truth about declawing, which I have to give credit to
> this group for, I felt awful. I let Dash get declawed when I was a
> teenager and I had no idea what it really was. I also blame vets for not
> telling their clients the truth.
>
> -Kelly
>
>

No More Retail
November 25th 05, 05:50 AM
I would have opened the door and said have a good night cat abusers are
not welcome in my house
You have every right to make a scene I told my wife sister's off in front
of everyone so she would get the point of running her mouth has after
effects. Every one gave her hell for what she did she went home early

At least you know how this people are and not to associate with them if they
are that way. People real faces always come out one way or another

"Cat Protector" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Well the worst part about this was because it was Thanksgiving dinner you
> can't make a scene. I was floored when she said she was taking their
> newest cat to get declawed. When I asked why she would do it and that
> declawing was wrong she didn't want to get into it. I got up and left and
> pretty much have nothing to say to these people anymore.
>
> --
> Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
> www.catgalaxymedia.com
>
> Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
> www.panthertekit.com
> "Snittens" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Cat Protector" > wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>>I know this is a topic that keeps popping up over and over again but it
>>>just goes to you that even during the holidays people still think about
>>>declawing their cats. Tonight at Thanksgiving dinner I was shocked to
>>>learn that a couple of guests (they are a married couple) who I had known
>>>for years actually have their cats declawed because they don't like their
>>>furniture being scratched up. When I started on the don't declaw cat
>>>side, one of them said they didn't want to get into this discussion.
>>> I have discovered that those who have no problem with declawing a cat
>>> never want to discuss it.
>>
>> <snip>
>>
>> Honestly, I don't understand why people care about their furniture so
>> damn much. It's just stuff. I never buy expensive furniture so that way
>> I don't get upset if it gets ruined. If the cats scratch it or it gets
>> stained, hey, that's what slipcovers are for.
>> People want to stay uninformed so that way they don't have to feel
>> guilty. After I learned the truth about declawing, which I have to give
>> credit to this group for, I felt awful. I let Dash get declawed when I
>> was a teenager and I had no idea what it really was. I also blame vets
>> for not telling their clients the truth.
>>
>> -Kelly
>>
>>
>
>

Cat Protector
November 25th 05, 06:09 AM
Well seeing that it was at my parent's house and Thanksgiving, I just held
in most of what I wanted to say. I pretty much said that I would never
declaw a cat. I feel bad for the cat that is getting the surgery. I think in
some ways I let it be known to her that I am against declawing and that it
is cruel. You can't change someone's mind because those who declaw don't
want to hear the truth.

--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com
"No More Retail" > wrote in message
...
>I would have opened the door and said have a good night cat abusers are
>not welcome in my house
> You have every right to make a scene I told my wife sister's off in
> front of everyone so she would get the point of running her mouth has
> after effects. Every one gave her hell for what she did she went home
> early
>
> At least you know how this people are and not to associate with them if
> they are that way. People real faces always come out one way or another
>
> "Cat Protector" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> Well the worst part about this was because it was Thanksgiving dinner you
>> can't make a scene. I was floored when she said she was taking their
>> newest cat to get declawed. When I asked why she would do it and that
>> declawing was wrong she didn't want to get into it. I got up and left and
>> pretty much have nothing to say to these people anymore.
>>
>> --
>> Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
>> www.catgalaxymedia.com
>>
>> Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
>> www.panthertekit.com
>> "Snittens" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>> "Cat Protector" > wrote in message
>>> news:[email protected]
>>>>I know this is a topic that keeps popping up over and over again but it
>>>>just goes to you that even during the holidays people still think about
>>>>declawing their cats. Tonight at Thanksgiving dinner I was shocked to
>>>>learn that a couple of guests (they are a married couple) who I had
>>>>known for years actually have their cats declawed because they don't
>>>>like their furniture being scratched up. When I started on the don't
>>>>declaw cat side, one of them said they didn't want to get into this
>>>>discussion.
>>>> I have discovered that those who have no problem with declawing a cat
>>>> never want to discuss it.
>>>
>>> <snip>
>>>
>>> Honestly, I don't understand why people care about their furniture so
>>> damn much. It's just stuff. I never buy expensive furniture so that
>>> way I don't get upset if it gets ruined. If the cats scratch it or it
>>> gets stained, hey, that's what slipcovers are for.
>>> People want to stay uninformed so that way they don't have to feel
>>> guilty. After I learned the truth about declawing, which I have to give
>>> credit to this group for, I felt awful. I let Dash get declawed when I
>>> was a teenager and I had no idea what it really was. I also blame vets
>>> for not telling their clients the truth.
>>>
>>> -Kelly
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>

No More Retail
November 25th 05, 06:16 AM
that is not true many years ago over 25 years I declawed my cats to keep
them from hurting each other I had a cat get into a fight and almost loose
an eye. My best friend now a vet was studying to be a vet took me into
what happens when a cat gets declawed I cried after I saw what happened.
Never again have I had it done. Uniformed people are willing to hear the
truth but a informed person that chooses to ignore the truth is the problem


"Cat Protector" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Well seeing that it was at my parent's house and Thanksgiving, I just held
> in most of what I wanted to say. I pretty much said that I would never
> declaw a cat. I feel bad for the cat that is getting the surgery. I think
> in some ways I let it be known to her that I am against declawing and that
> it is cruel. You can't change someone's mind because those who declaw
> don't want to hear the truth.
>
> --
> Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
> www.catgalaxymedia.com
>
> Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
> www.panthertekit.com
> "No More Retail" > wrote in message
> ...
>>I would have opened the door and said have a good night cat abusers are
>>not welcome in my house
>> You have every right to make a scene I told my wife sister's off in
>> front of everyone so she would get the point of running her mouth has
>> after effects. Every one gave her hell for what she did she went home
>> early
>>
>> At least you know how this people are and not to associate with them if
>> they are that way. People real faces always come out one way or another
>>
>> "Cat Protector" > wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>> Well the worst part about this was because it was Thanksgiving dinner
>>> you can't make a scene. I was floored when she said she was taking their
>>> newest cat to get declawed. When I asked why she would do it and that
>>> declawing was wrong she didn't want to get into it. I got up and left
>>> and pretty much have nothing to say to these people anymore.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
>>> www.catgalaxymedia.com
>>>
>>> Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
>>> www.panthertekit.com
>>> "Snittens" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>>
>>>> "Cat Protector" > wrote in message
>>>> news:[email protected]
>>>>>I know this is a topic that keeps popping up over and over again but it
>>>>>just goes to you that even during the holidays people still think about
>>>>>declawing their cats. Tonight at Thanksgiving dinner I was shocked to
>>>>>learn that a couple of guests (they are a married couple) who I had
>>>>>known for years actually have their cats declawed because they don't
>>>>>like their furniture being scratched up. When I started on the don't
>>>>>declaw cat side, one of them said they didn't want to get into this
>>>>>discussion.
>>>>> I have discovered that those who have no problem with declawing a cat
>>>>> never want to discuss it.
>>>>
>>>> <snip>
>>>>
>>>> Honestly, I don't understand why people care about their furniture so
>>>> damn much. It's just stuff. I never buy expensive furniture so that
>>>> way I don't get upset if it gets ruined. If the cats scratch it or it
>>>> gets stained, hey, that's what slipcovers are for.
>>>> People want to stay uninformed so that way they don't have to feel
>>>> guilty. After I learned the truth about declawing, which I have to give
>>>> credit to this group for, I felt awful. I let Dash get declawed when I
>>>> was a teenager and I had no idea what it really was. I also blame vets
>>>> for not telling their clients the truth.
>>>>
>>>> -Kelly
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>>
>
>

Joe Canuck
November 25th 05, 01:38 PM
Cat Protector wrote:

> I know this is a topic that keeps popping up over and over again but it just
> goes to you that even during the holidays people still think about declawing
> their cats. Tonight at Thanksgiving dinner I was shocked to learn that a
> couple of guests (they are a married couple) who I had known for years
> actually have their cats declawed because they don't like their furniture
> being scratched up. When I started on the don't declaw cat side, one of them
> said they didn't want to get into this discussion.
> I have discovered that those who have no problem with declawing a cat never
> want to discuss it.
> I pretty much had to hold it in so Thanksgiving dinner wouldn't be ruined

> for everyone but I am amazed how people you think you know, you really don't
> know. It seems that those who declaw cats really don't want to know about

Oh man, yes, isn't that the truth!

> the facts that state declawing is wrong and how it hurts the cat.
>
> This seems to be why we have such wars on here about declawing. I would
> never declaw a cat because furniture can be replaced and if you take simple
> steps like teaching them to use a scratching post (and praising them for
> doing so) as well clipping their claws and giving a firm NO (or squirting
> them with water) when scratching in areas that declawing would not be
> needed. I think those who declaw don't want to know the truth or simply
> can't handle it. I am proud of being on the side that doesn't declaw. Cats
> don't deserve such punishment. They are beautiful and wonderful creatures
> and should not be harmed. Those who declaw, let's face it are comitting
> animal cruelty and don't even realize it because in their mind it isn't
> wrong. When will these people learn?

Never is the answer, particulary in some hard core cases.

> Declawing is wrong no matter how you
> slice it. Declawing a cat also results in behavioral problems with the
> animal and they also have health problems as well. A declawed cat also loses
> one of their main defensive mechanisms should they ever get outside.
>
> Many animal rescue groups often speak out against declawing but it seems
> many don't listen. I have yet to meet that one human believes in declawing
> but that is willing to go through the procedure themselves (or one similar).
> I doubt I ever will. I think those who declaw cats are nothing but cowards.
> It is easy to hide behind ignorance when putting their cat through the
> procedure but have they ever asked their cats if it is ok? How would humans
> feel if cats just scheduled an appointment for them to have important body
> parts removed so their home or furniture wouldn't be ruined? I doubt a human
> would find that cool. So, for those considering declawing, read the facts.
> There are so many non-harmful treatments you can try to curb bad behavior
> and best of all it'd be cheaper. Enough said.
>

Yep, teach them early on and often what is and isn't appropriate. There
will still be inappropriate clawing but that is to be accepted when one
is owned by a cat. We don't alter a living thing to suit our own needs,
but rather we must accept them as they are. Perhaps those who cannot
accept them as should reconsider their pet choice.

Wendy
November 25th 05, 01:53 PM
"Snittens" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Cat Protector" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>I know this is a topic that keeps popping up over and over again but it
>>just goes to you that even during the holidays people still think about
>>declawing their cats. Tonight at Thanksgiving dinner I was shocked to
>>learn that a couple of guests (they are a married couple) who I had known
>>for years actually have their cats declawed because they don't like their
>>furniture being scratched up. When I started on the don't declaw cat side,
>>one of them said they didn't want to get into this discussion.
>> I have discovered that those who have no problem with declawing a cat
>> never want to discuss it.
>
> <snip>
>
> Honestly, I don't understand why people care about their furniture so damn
> much. It's just stuff. I never buy expensive furniture so that way I
> don't get upset if it gets ruined. If the cats scratch it or it gets
> stained, hey, that's what slipcovers are for.
> People want to stay uninformed so that way they don't have to feel guilty.
> After I learned the truth about declawing, which I have to give credit to
> this group for, I felt awful. I let Dash get declawed when I was a
> teenager and I had no idea what it really was. I also blame vets for not
> telling their clients the truth.
>
> -Kelly
>
>

They don't want to have to spend any time training the cat nor do they want
to spend the money on a good scratching post or cat tree. Maybe the cat tree
doesn't match their decor or something. They never see the problem as their
problem. The cat is the problem so they have it de-clawed. They bring the
cat home from surgery voilą! problem solved. Instant gratification.

W

whitershadeofpale
November 25th 05, 02:06 PM
No More Retail wrote:
> that is not true many years ago over 25 years I declawed my cats to keep
> them from hurting each other I had a cat get into a fight and almost loose
> an eye. My best friend now a vet was studying to be a vet took me into
> what happens when a cat gets declawed I cried after I saw what happened.
> Never again have I had it done. Uniformed people are willing to hear the
> truth but a informed person that chooses to ignore the truth is the problem
>

Some people are successful in educating others on the subject
some are not. Being understood and heard can have nothing to do with
the message
but the messenger. If someone was to jump me about declawing my cats
I would think they are extreme and have a major malfunction.
(that's me)

So sure, being right about something, does not negate the need for a
practical
effective method to educate someone.

You know, like if someone threw paint on my new Lion Fur Coat?
It would be better for them to explain where they are coming from
rather than destroy personal property.

Because there was a day, when they was wearing a coat just like mine.

CatNipped
November 25th 05, 05:25 PM
"Cat Protector" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I know this is a topic that keeps popping up over and over again but it
just
> goes to you that even during the holidays people still think about
declawing
> their cats. Tonight at Thanksgiving dinner I was shocked to learn that a
> couple of guests (they are a married couple) who I had known for years
> actually have their cats declawed because they don't like their furniture
> being scratched up. When I started on the don't declaw cat side, one of
them
> said they didn't want to get into this discussion.
> I have discovered that those who have no problem with declawing a cat
never
> want to discuss it.
> I pretty much had to hold it in so Thanksgiving dinner wouldn't be ruined
> for everyone but I am amazed how people you think you know, you really
don't
> know. It seems that those who declaw cats really don't want to know about
> the facts that state declawing is wrong and how it hurts the cat.
>
> This seems to be why we have such wars on here about declawing. I would
> never declaw a cat because furniture can be replaced and if you take
simple
> steps like teaching them to use a scratching post (and praising them for
> doing so) as well clipping their claws and giving a firm NO (or squirting
> them with water) when scratching in areas that declawing would not be
> needed. I think those who declaw don't want to know the truth or simply
> can't handle it. I am proud of being on the side that doesn't declaw. Cats
> don't deserve such punishment. They are beautiful and wonderful creatures
> and should not be harmed. Those who declaw, let's face it are comitting
> animal cruelty and don't even realize it because in their mind it isn't
> wrong. When will these people learn? Declawing is wrong no matter how you
> slice it. Declawing a cat also results in behavioral problems with the
> animal and they also have health problems as well. A declawed cat also
loses
> one of their main defensive mechanisms should they ever get outside.
>
> Many animal rescue groups often speak out against declawing but it seems
> many don't listen. I have yet to meet that one human believes in declawing
> but that is willing to go through the procedure themselves (or one
similar).
> I doubt I ever will. I think those who declaw cats are nothing but
cowards.
> It is easy to hide behind ignorance when putting their cat through the
> procedure but have they ever asked their cats if it is ok? How would
humans
> feel if cats just scheduled an appointment for them to have important body
> parts removed so their home or furniture wouldn't be ruined? I doubt a
human
> would find that cool. So, for those considering declawing, read the facts.
> There are so many non-harmful treatments you can try to curb bad behavior
> and best of all it'd be cheaper. Enough said.

I had a cat declawed many, many years ago because a landlord said I had to
in order to keep the cat. I only *WISH* someone had told me what that
involved - I would have moved to a different apartment or even lived in a
cardboard box under an overpass ifI had known how much it hurt and how much
it would affect the quality of her life.

When you meet up with someone who is considering having a cat declawed
simply ask them, "How much do you love your cat." If they say even, "A
little", then tell them, "here is something you need to know, then."

Hugs,

CatNipped

> --
> Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
> www.catgalaxymedia.com
>
> Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
> www.panthertekit.com
>
>

PawsForThought
November 25th 05, 07:39 PM
No More Retail wrote:
> you can tell a person's real face by how they treat their pets

Very true. My ex-stepmother-from-hell declawed her cats, and she was a
horrible person, in general.

Cat Protector
November 25th 05, 08:28 PM
I think for me the sad part is there was nothing I could really do or say. I
was cut-off and she told me she didn't want to talk about it. That to me
said she has probably already heard the side of people like me and didn't
want to hear it. You can't reach people like that so it was hard knowing
that no matter what, they are going to do it anyway. I kind of felt like a
real failure. The worse part was it was at Thanksgiving dinner which most
people frown on because they don't want to fight and make it unpleasant for
everyone. Besides you can't talk someone out of declawing their cat if they
do not care to know the facts or even want to listen.

--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com

> When you meet up with someone who is considering having a cat declawed
> simply ask them, "How much do you love your cat." If they say even, "A
> little", then tell them, "here is something you need to know, then."
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped
>
>> --
>> Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
>> www.catgalaxymedia.com
>>
>> Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
>> www.panthertekit.com
>>
>>
>
>

Niel Humphreys
November 25th 05, 08:38 PM
"Cat Protector" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I think for me the sad part is there was nothing I could really do or say.
>I was cut-off and she told me she didn't want to talk about it. That to me
>said she has probably already heard the side of people like me and didn't
>want to hear it. You can't reach people like that so it was hard knowing
>that no matter what, they are going to do it anyway. I kind of felt like a
>real failure. The worse part was it was at Thanksgiving dinner which most
>people frown on because they don't want to fight and make it unpleasant for
>everyone. Besides you can't talk someone out of declawing their cat if they
>do not care to know the facts or even want to listen.


I'd have just got up and gone home, not after the meal but there and then.
--

Niel H

dnr
November 25th 05, 11:50 PM
"Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
message ...
> "Cat Protector" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>I think for me the sad part is there was nothing I could really do or say.
>>I was cut-off and she told me she didn't want to talk about it. That to me
>>said she has probably already heard the side of people like me and didn't
>>want to hear it. You can't reach people like that so it was hard knowing
>>that no matter what, they are going to do it anyway. I kind of felt like a
>>real failure. The worse part was it was at Thanksgiving dinner which most
>>people frown on because they don't want to fight and make it unpleasant
>>for everyone. Besides you can't talk someone out of declawing their cat if
>>they do not care to know the facts or even want to listen.
>
>
> I'd have just got up and gone home, not after the meal but there and then.
> --
>
> Niel H


Agree w/general consensus: people *for* declawing just don't want to hear
logic about it *as a surgery*. But I have enlightened them during a visit to
my home (not a holiday dinner table) as they see two fully clawed adult cats
here (the third was front-declawed long before he came here) among the Ethan
Allen custom-leather sofa
and its footstool, also an orange-trim denim lounge (we are Broncomania
here) untouched by cat claws. I explain that I control the atmosphere of
tempting claw-sharpening
issues by diligent and frequent claw-trimming of the clawed duo as well as
many, many, heavy, ornamental
large throws completely covering (including *backs*) this
expensive furniture! All throws are "whipped right off" when company comes.
You can pick these throws up, if $ is short, for a couple dollars each at
Goodwill, Salvation Army thrift stores in your area. Once in awhile, one of
the clawed cats will sink a claw into one of the throws but they are so
thick the leather is never reached through them. I don't want to bother with
training cats (similar in my book to "herding cats" LOL) or having a crowded
living room full of scratching posts. Many years of clipping has kind of
"trained" them to put up with claw trimming, and honed my skills of
close-but-no-vein-contact work.
Caveat: do NOT ever attempt clipping with *dog* nail clippers. These will
pull, shred claws as well as scare your cat. If any "declawing" believers
read this long post, try my methods (fairly cheap but a little
demanding: regular clipping) before you condemn your cat to this unpleasant
fate.

.oO rach Oo.
November 26th 05, 01:43 AM
People like that really **** me off. THEY brought it up along with their
lack of interest on training them out of it or clipping the claws. As soon
as someone offers their own opinion, the discussion is over. I would have
asked them if it was a discussion they were looking for or if they were
making a speech.

Too bad they didn't choke on the wishbone.

--
..oO rach Oo.


"Cat Protector" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>I know this is a topic that keeps popping up over and over again but it
>just goes to you that even during the holidays people still think about
>declawing their cats. Tonight at Thanksgiving dinner I was shocked to learn
>that a couple of guests (they are a married couple) who I had known for
>years actually have their cats declawed because they don't like their
>furniture being scratched up. When I started on the don't declaw cat side,
>one of them said they didn't want to get into this discussion.
> I have discovered that those who have no problem with declawing a cat
> never want to discuss it.
> I pretty much had to hold it in so Thanksgiving dinner wouldn't be ruined
> for everyone but I am amazed how people you think you know, you really
> don't know. It seems that those who declaw cats really don't want to know
> about the facts that state declawing is wrong and how it hurts the cat.
>
> This seems to be why we have such wars on here about declawing. I would
> never declaw a cat because furniture can be replaced and if you take
> simple steps like teaching them to use a scratching post (and praising
> them for doing so) as well clipping their claws and giving a firm NO (or
> squirting them with water) when scratching in areas that declawing would
> not be needed. I think those who declaw don't want to know the truth or
> simply can't handle it. I am proud of being on the side that doesn't
> declaw. Cats don't deserve such punishment. They are beautiful and
> wonderful creatures and should not be harmed. Those who declaw, let's face
> it are comitting animal cruelty and don't even realize it because in their
> mind it isn't wrong. When will these people learn? Declawing is wrong no
> matter how you slice it. Declawing a cat also results in behavioral
> problems with the animal and they also have health problems as well. A
> declawed cat also loses one of their main defensive mechanisms should they
> ever get outside.
>
> Many animal rescue groups often speak out against declawing but it seems
> many don't listen. I have yet to meet that one human believes in declawing
> but that is willing to go through the procedure themselves (or one
> similar). I doubt I ever will. I think those who declaw cats are nothing
> but cowards. It is easy to hide behind ignorance when putting their cat
> through the procedure but have they ever asked their cats if it is ok? How
> would humans feel if cats just scheduled an appointment for them to have
> important body parts removed so their home or furniture wouldn't be
> ruined? I doubt a human would find that cool. So, for those considering
> declawing, read the facts. There are so many non-harmful treatments you
> can try to curb bad behavior and best of all it'd be cheaper. Enough said.
>
> --
> Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
> www.catgalaxymedia.com
>
> Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
> www.panthertekit.com
>

furfin
November 26th 05, 06:40 AM
Cat Protector, I think I know how you feel. A while back I was shocked
to learn that my sister, who I think of as a real animal lover (she has
a pot bellied pig she loves, and has had numerous snakes) had sometime
in the past had her cats declawed after unsucessfully trying to train
and tempt them away from destroying some stupid 1950's colonial repro
dining room table that she considered an heirloom. When she eventually
married an allergic man she rehomed these cats with friends and got the
pig, which doesn't activate his allergies.

We were discussing this when she mentioned the declawing. I was kind of
stunned. It was all in the past, and she will probably never have cats
again due to hubby, so there wasn't much point in making her feel
really horrible about it. I did tell her I think declawing is wrong,
that it is like cutting off fingers, that it causes behavior problems.
She claimed her cats seemed fine afterwards, she even laughed about
their attempts to scratch with their poor little stumps.

I do like my sister and I didn't want to hurt her feelings, so I didn't
push the discussion very far. I honestly think she had no concept of
what she had done to her cats...she really did love and spoil them
otherwise. She told me she had spent extra money to get a laser declaw
which the vet had told her was better. I blame the vet for minimizing
what the procedure actually is.

I feel sad for her cats and I can see how a person who had done such a
thing would prefer to remain in denial about its atrociousness. I
really admire the people on this newsgroup who can admit they are sorry
to have declawed cats in the past when they were misinformed about it.
Most people can never admit they were wrong, and I really admire those
who can...they are much freer actually, and capable of learning and
changing. I'm glad the information is out there on the internet now,
because I think it probably is saving some cats from the hell of
declawing.

Cat Protector
November 26th 05, 07:46 AM
Well when I saw she didn't want to hear it and cut me off short, I just got
up and walked away from the table upset. I could have yelled and screamed
but it would have spoiled it for everyone else. Knowing this cat is getting
declawed on Monday is upsetting but even more is the fact I can't do
anything about it.

--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com
"dnr" > wrote in message
...
> Agree w/general consensus: people *for* declawing just don't want to hear
> logic about it *as a surgery*. But I have enlightened them during a visit
> to my home (not a holiday dinner table) as they see two fully clawed adult
> cats here (the third was front-declawed long before he came here) among
> the Ethan Allen custom-leather sofa
> and its footstool, also an orange-trim denim lounge (we are Broncomania
> here) untouched by cat claws. I explain that I control the atmosphere of
> tempting claw-sharpening
> issues by diligent and frequent claw-trimming of the clawed duo as well as
> many, many, heavy, ornamental
> large throws completely covering (including *backs*) this
> expensive furniture! All throws are "whipped right off" when company
> comes. You can pick these throws up, if $ is short, for a couple dollars
> each at Goodwill, Salvation Army thrift stores in your area. Once in
> awhile, one of the clawed cats will sink a claw into one of the throws but
> they are so thick the leather is never reached through them. I don't want
> to bother with training cats (similar in my book to "herding cats" LOL) or
> having a crowded living room full of scratching posts. Many years of
> clipping has kind of "trained" them to put up with claw trimming, and
> honed my skills of close-but-no-vein-contact work.
> Caveat: do NOT ever attempt clipping with *dog* nail clippers. These will
> pull, shred claws as well as scare your cat. If any "declawing" believers
> read this long post, try my methods (fairly cheap but a little
> demanding: regular clipping) before you condemn your cat to this
> unpleasant fate.
>

Cat Protector
November 26th 05, 07:52 AM
Well I was upset and it being Thanksgiving dinner there was not much I could
do. Before I even started to tell the reasons why a cat shouldn't be
declawed, I was cut off by the person. She didn't want to hear me out so I
just got up from the table and walked away angry. I always thought this
person wouldn't harm a fly but I was wrong. The worst thing is people like
that feel that getting a cat is their business and those that object have no
right to tell them what they can and can't do with their cats. It makes me
mad.

--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com
"furfin" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Cat Protector, I think I know how you feel. A while back I was shocked
> to learn that my sister, who I think of as a real animal lover (she has
> a pot bellied pig she loves, and has had numerous snakes) had sometime
> in the past had her cats declawed after unsucessfully trying to train
> and tempt them away from destroying some stupid 1950's colonial repro
> dining room table that she considered an heirloom. When she eventually
> married an allergic man she rehomed these cats with friends and got the
> pig, which doesn't activate his allergies.
>
> We were discussing this when she mentioned the declawing. I was kind of
> stunned. It was all in the past, and she will probably never have cats
> again due to hubby, so there wasn't much point in making her feel
> really horrible about it. I did tell her I think declawing is wrong,
> that it is like cutting off fingers, that it causes behavior problems.
> She claimed her cats seemed fine afterwards, she even laughed about
> their attempts to scratch with their poor little stumps.
>
> I do like my sister and I didn't want to hurt her feelings, so I didn't
> push the discussion very far. I honestly think she had no concept of
> what she had done to her cats...she really did love and spoil them
> otherwise. She told me she had spent extra money to get a laser declaw
> which the vet had told her was better. I blame the vet for minimizing
> what the procedure actually is.
>
> I feel sad for her cats and I can see how a person who had done such a
> thing would prefer to remain in denial about its atrociousness. I
> really admire the people on this newsgroup who can admit they are sorry
> to have declawed cats in the past when they were misinformed about it.
> Most people can never admit they were wrong, and I really admire those
> who can...they are much freer actually, and capable of learning and
> changing. I'm glad the information is out there on the internet now,
> because I think it probably is saving some cats from the hell of
> declawing.
>

-L.
November 26th 05, 09:59 AM
Wendy wrote:
> They don't want to have to spend any time training the cat nor do they want
> to spend the money on a good scratching post or cat tree. Maybe the cat tree
> doesn't match their decor or something. They never see the problem as their
> problem. The cat is the problem so they have it de-clawed. They bring the
> cat home from surgery voilą! problem solved. Instant gratification.
>
> W

Yep. It's pretty much a symptom of our Walmart society. They want
thier stuff NOW, they want it cheap, don't care about quality and they
want it because everybody else has it.

That being said, if you know the person well enough you can usually
talk them out of declawing. My sister was going to declaw two of her
cats - I talked her out of it pretty quick. But she didn't know what
was involved and when I told her she was horrified. But like the OP
said - if they know what it is and still don't care, there isn't much
you can do about it. We once had a Jr. assistant (student) at the vet
office I worked at tell a client to declaw a former feral. I about hit
the roof. Smarmy little bitch looked me in the face and said "Yeah, I
KNOW what it is." I could have slapped her. The head vet tech
eventually told her to quit giving out advice to clients - that it
wasn't her place. Thank god.

-L.

Wendy
November 26th 05, 12:53 PM
"-L." > wrote in message
oups.com...

Wendy wrote:
> They don't want to have to spend any time training the cat nor do they
> want
> to spend the money on a good scratching post or cat tree. Maybe the cat
> tree
> doesn't match their decor or something. They never see the problem as
> their
> problem. The cat is the problem so they have it de-clawed. They bring the
> cat home from surgery voilą! problem solved. Instant gratification.
>
> W

Yep. It's pretty much a symptom of our Walmart society. They want
thier stuff NOW, they want it cheap, don't care about quality and they
want it because everybody else has it.

That being said, if you know the person well enough you can usually
talk them out of declawing. My sister was going to declaw two of her
cats - I talked her out of it pretty quick. But she didn't know what
was involved and when I told her she was horrified. But like the OP
said - if they know what it is and still don't care, there isn't much
you can do about it. We once had a Jr. assistant (student) at the vet
office I worked at tell a client to declaw a former feral. I about hit
the roof. Smarmy little bitch looked me in the face and said "Yeah, I
KNOW what it is." I could have slapped her. The head vet tech
eventually told her to quit giving out advice to clients - that it
wasn't her place. Thank god.

-L.

Did you ever find out WHY the Jr. assistant was recommending having the cat
de-clawed? Was she not familiar with alternatives? trying to drum up
business for the vet? Maybe she learned about it from someone who assured
her the cat never notices the loss. Vets who do this surgery have to have
some way to justify themselves.

W

cybercat
November 26th 05, 08:18 PM
"Niel Humphreys" > wrote in
message ...
> "Cat Protector" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> >I think for me the sad part is there was nothing I could really do or
say.
> >I was cut-off and she told me she didn't want to talk about it. That to
me
> >said she has probably already heard the side of people like me and didn't
> >want to hear it. You can't reach people like that so it was hard knowing
> >that no matter what, they are going to do it anyway. I kind of felt like
a
> >real failure. The worse part was it was at Thanksgiving dinner which most
> >people frown on because they don't want to fight and make it unpleasant
for
> >everyone. Besides you can't talk someone out of declawing their cat if
they
> >do not care to know the facts or even want to listen.
>
>
> I'd have just got up and gone home, not after the meal but there and then.
> --
>

I'm sure that would have been helpful.

PawsForThought
November 26th 05, 10:59 PM
Cat Protector wrote:
> Well when I saw she didn't want to hear it and cut me off short, I just got
> up and walked away from the table upset. I could have yelled and screamed
> but it would have spoiled it for everyone else. Knowing this cat is getting
> declawed on Monday is upsetting but even more is the fact I can't do
> anything about it.

Do they live nearby? If so, I would print out some info from some of
the websites and bring it to her house. Does she have email? You
could send some of the pics from www.declawing.com to her. Don't know
if it would help, but I don't think it could hurt.

Cat Protector
November 26th 05, 11:15 PM
They actually moved but don't know where there house is. I was told that
their email is down as a result.

--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com
"PawsForThought" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> Cat Protector wrote:
>> Well when I saw she didn't want to hear it and cut me off short, I just
>> got
>> up and walked away from the table upset. I could have yelled and screamed
>> but it would have spoiled it for everyone else. Knowing this cat is
>> getting
>> declawed on Monday is upsetting but even more is the fact I can't do
>> anything about it.
>
> Do they live nearby? If so, I would print out some info from some of
> the websites and bring it to her house. Does she have email? You
> could send some of the pics from www.declawing.com to her. Don't know
> if it would help, but I don't think it could hurt.
>

-L.
November 27th 05, 06:13 AM
Wendy wrote:
> Did you ever find out WHY the Jr. assistant was recommending having the cat
> de-clawed? Was she not familiar with alternatives? trying to drum up
> business for the vet? Maybe she learned about it from someone who assured
> her the cat never notices the loss. Vets who do this surgery have to have
> some way to justify themselves.
>
> W

She was a new hire (to boot!) and all of her cats were declawed. She
was of the mentality that declawing was the way to solve scratching and
aggression problems. The head vet at this practice basically felt the
same way despite all the cats we saw that had post-declaw problems -
arthritis in old age, biting, aggression, etc. He'd just blame it on
something else. This is the same asshole who would bitch at me for
putting "too much" bleach in the wash.

Thank God there was one vet with a conscience (and two that were middle
of the road) or I probably would have quit sooner. It was an
excellent experience, but if I ever do it again, it will not be for a
practice that condones declawing.

-L.