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ken
December 1st 05, 03:33 PM
what do you think of nail caps to prevent a lot of furniture
scratching? It sounds like a lot of work - gluing a cap on each claw

Ken

December 2nd 05, 12:01 PM
I'll let you know after this weekend, since I am about to apply a set
to a 7 week old that is ripping up my arms when we play. (I have very
thin skin due to massive antibiotic usage in the past), however I've
been holding off since I'm sure I'm going to look like I wrestled a
thorn bush when I'm finished doin Lucifer's nails. Much bandages and
betadine will be on hand.
Di
ken wrote:
> what do you think of nail caps to prevent a lot of furniture
> scratching? It sounds like a lot of work - gluing a cap on each claw
>
> Ken

Joe Canuck
December 2nd 05, 12:31 PM
ken wrote:

> what do you think of nail caps to prevent a lot of furniture
> scratching? It sounds like a lot of work - gluing a cap on each claw
>
> Ken
>

Nail caps eventually fall off, some sooner rather than later. Not only
that, but the cat may not adapt to them and between application time and
the time they fall off you may have one upset kitty on your hands.

Better to have trained them what is and isn't appropriate scratching and
provide plenty of areas where scratching is acceptable -and- keep their
claws trimmed to minimize the damage.

Joe Canuck
December 2nd 05, 12:34 PM
wrote:

> I'll let you know after this weekend, since I am about to apply a set
> to a 7 week old that is ripping up my arms when we play.


That is the root of the problem, that your cat has come to consider your
hands and arms playthings.

Never play with your cat using your hands, but rather using something
you hold with your hands.


> (I have very
> thin skin due to massive antibiotic usage in the past), however I've
> been holding off since I'm sure I'm going to look like I wrestled a
> thorn bush when I'm finished doin Lucifer's nails. Much bandages and
> betadine will be on hand.
> Di
> ken wrote:
>
>>what do you think of nail caps to prevent a lot of furniture
>>scratching? It sounds like a lot of work - gluing a cap on each claw
>>
>>Ken
>
>

Wendy
December 7th 05, 03:28 PM
"ken" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> what do you think of nail caps to prevent a lot of furniture
> scratching? It sounds like a lot of work - gluing a cap on each claw
>
> Ken
>

Many groomers will apply them for you. They should stay on until the cat
sheds the nail sheath.

If you don't want to do that, buy a nice big cat tree or heavy scratching
post that is large enough for the cat to stretch on and heavy enough the cat
can't knock it over. If the post isn't secure the cat won't use it. Many
cats like the ones that are wrapped with the sisal rope. Other cats prefer
to scratch on horizontal surfaces. In that case a inexpensive cardboard
scratcher (sold in most pet stores and probably Walmart) will do. Then spray
the tree/post/scratcher with catnip. Feed kitty treats on the post/tree. Do
everything to give kitty good associations with it. Praise the cat when
he/she uses it. Place the post/tree/scratcher near the place the cat has
been scratching. You can gradually move it to another location after kitty
is using it reliably but don't remove it from that room.

Apply double side sticky tape (available in pet stores - easily removable
leaving no residue when you're done) to the furniture that the cat was
interested in.


W