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weft2
December 1st 05, 07:48 PM
I have an indoor/outdoor cat who comes in most nights (99% of the time
during our harsh winters) and who is confined to a large, warm basement
room (in the same room as our computers) with the door shut. Other
people in the house have allergies, so generally she is not allowed to
wander.

The problem is, we now have an invasion of mice who are eating and
defecating throughout the basement. I've seem them run over/under the
fluorescent light fixtures, and the sonic mouse deterrant we have
doesn't seem to work anymore, though I think it did when we first got
it a few years ago. On a trial basis, I've also let the cat loose
several times in the basement to investigate, but she never comes up
with anything. Unfortunately, she is not much of a mouser, and just
kills birds most of the time, hence her prescription for Drontal.

My questions are: is it safe to put open Warfarin (looks like little
seed packets) boxes around the basement, espc. in the room the cat
sleeps in, as well as another room which she stays in from time to
time.

Also, has anyone had any accidents with house pets, cats, etc while
using Warfarin in their house? I would assume or at least hope that
most animals like cats would be repulsed by the smell of the Warfarin
and not eat it? Unless it was flavoured to appeal to mice?

Finally, if the mice did eat the Warfarin, and by some chance the cat
came upon them, would they be poisoned by eating or mauling the dead
mice?

The people I share the house with are not huge pet lovers, and more
importantly, have lost patience with trying to eradicate the mouse
problem with more milder methods, so I'm trying to see if the Warfarin
can be a viable option- or at least not a fatal one.

Thanks for any input

William Hamblen
December 2nd 05, 12:37 AM
On 1 Dec 2005 10:48:23 -0800, "weft2" > wrote:

Warfarin can be toxic to dogs and cats. The vet can treat animals for
accidental warfarin poisoning, but it is better to avoid using mouse
baits around cats. Warfarin also is used to treat some heart problems
in animals as well as people. Small doses are therapeutic. Overdoses
are not.

Another problem with mouse baits is that the mouse crawls into a
hidden place to die and decompose, filling the house with the odor of
rotting mouse corpse.

Kim
December 3rd 05, 03:42 AM
I wouldn't risk using warfarin in this case.

Live traps work well if baited with peanut butter. You have to release the
mice at least a mile away or they return though.


"weft2" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I have an indoor/outdoor cat who comes in most nights (99% of the time
> during our harsh winters) and who is confined to a large, warm basement
> room (in the same room as our computers) with the door shut. Other
> people in the house have allergies, so generally she is not allowed to
> wander.
>
> The problem is, we now have an invasion of mice who are eating and
> defecating throughout the basement. I've seem them run over/under the
> fluorescent light fixtures, and the sonic mouse deterrant we have
> doesn't seem to work anymore, though I think it did when we first got
> it a few years ago. On a trial basis, I've also let the cat loose
> several times in the basement to investigate, but she never comes up
> with anything. Unfortunately, she is not much of a mouser, and just
> kills birds most of the time, hence her prescription for Drontal.
>
> My questions are: is it safe to put open Warfarin (looks like little
> seed packets) boxes around the basement, espc. in the room the cat
> sleeps in, as well as another room which she stays in from time to
> time.
>
> Also, has anyone had any accidents with house pets, cats, etc while
> using Warfarin in their house? I would assume or at least hope that
> most animals like cats would be repulsed by the smell of the Warfarin
> and not eat it? Unless it was flavoured to appeal to mice?
>
> Finally, if the mice did eat the Warfarin, and by some chance the cat
> came upon them, would they be poisoned by eating or mauling the dead
> mice?
>
> The people I share the house with are not huge pet lovers, and more
> importantly, have lost patience with trying to eradicate the mouse
> problem with more milder methods, so I'm trying to see if the Warfarin
> can be a viable option- or at least not a fatal one.
>
> Thanks for any input
>

john smith
December 3rd 05, 08:11 AM
I would just get the mouse traps that use sticky tape. Maybe an enclosed
box kind. Works great. They love peanut butter.



"weft2" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I have an indoor/outdoor cat who comes in most nights (99% of the time
> during our harsh winters) and who is confined to a large, warm basement
> room (in the same room as our computers) with the door shut. Other
> people in the house have allergies, so generally she is not allowed to
> wander.
>
> The problem is, we now have an invasion of mice who are eating and
> defecating throughout the basement. I've seem them run over/under the
> fluorescent light fixtures, and the sonic mouse deterrant we have
> doesn't seem to work anymore, though I think it did when we first got
> it a few years ago. On a trial basis, I've also let the cat loose
> several times in the basement to investigate, but she never comes up
> with anything. Unfortunately, she is not much of a mouser, and just
> kills birds most of the time, hence her prescription for Drontal.
>
> My questions are: is it safe to put open Warfarin (looks like little
> seed packets) boxes around the basement, espc. in the room the cat
> sleeps in, as well as another room which she stays in from time to
> time.
>
> Also, has anyone had any accidents with house pets, cats, etc while
> using Warfarin in their house? I would assume or at least hope that
> most animals like cats would be repulsed by the smell of the Warfarin
> and not eat it? Unless it was flavoured to appeal to mice?
>
> Finally, if the mice did eat the Warfarin, and by some chance the cat
> came upon them, would they be poisoned by eating or mauling the dead
> mice?
>
> The people I share the house with are not huge pet lovers, and more
> importantly, have lost patience with trying to eradicate the mouse
> problem with more milder methods, so I'm trying to see if the Warfarin
> can be a viable option- or at least not a fatal one.
>
> Thanks for any input
>

Veloise
December 3rd 05, 04:42 PM
weft2 wrote:
> ...mice

How about borrowing a neighbor's cat to take care of the mice (and
perhaps provide private lessons to yours)?

HTH

--Karen D.