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December 12th 05, 08:24 PM
As I had written, my mom's cat with the sore on her right hind leg
developed diarrhea last Thursday. We thought it might be caused switching
her from Purina Pro Plan Chicken and Rice to Purina Pro Plan Sensitive Skin
and Stomach due to a persistent sore on her right hind leg.

She's back on Chicken and Rice dry food for the last five day, and is
eating and drinking ok. She hasn't vomited (thank goodness) and is alert.
The only problem is the diarrhea and the skin.

The vet just recommended one quarter of a tablet of Pepto Bismol 2x a day,
but I'm reading all over the net that Pepto Bismol contains a salicylate
which is very harmful to cats and that Kaopectate is the way to go.


Comments? Please!

Karen
December 12th 05, 08:32 PM
I've heard there is now an ingrediant in pepto bismal that is very bad for
cats! It did not used to be there. I will tell you what cleared up my cats
diarrhea and that is canned w/d food from the vets. I mean in 24 hours
mixing that in with her regular food cleared it up and now as long as she
has at least half a can of that a day she does fine.

> wrote in message
...
> As I had written, my mom's cat with the sore on her right hind leg
> developed diarrhea last Thursday. We thought it might be caused switching
> her from Purina Pro Plan Chicken and Rice to Purina Pro Plan Sensitive
Skin
> and Stomach due to a persistent sore on her right hind leg.
>
> She's back on Chicken and Rice dry food for the last five day, and is
> eating and drinking ok. She hasn't vomited (thank goodness) and is alert.
> The only problem is the diarrhea and the skin.
>
> The vet just recommended one quarter of a tablet of Pepto Bismol 2x a day,
> but I'm reading all over the net that Pepto Bismol contains a salicylate
> which is very harmful to cats and that Kaopectate is the way to go.
>
>
> Comments? Please!

December 12th 05, 08:48 PM
The ingredient is called subsalicylate
(http://www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/nov03/031115b.asp) which is
unfortunately now in Kaopectate, too! So what to do?

By the way, whis does w/d stand for and is this part of the Hills Science
Diet family?




"Karen" > wrote in
:

> I've heard there is now an ingrediant in pepto bismal that is very bad
> for cats! It did not used to be there. I will tell you what cleared up
> my cats diarrhea and that is canned w/d food from the vets. I mean in
> 24 hours mixing that in with her regular food cleared it up and now as
> long as she has at least half a can of that a day she does fine.
>
> > wrote in message
> ...
>> As I had written, my mom's cat with the sore on her right hind leg
>> developed diarrhea last Thursday. We thought it might be caused
>> switching her from Purina Pro Plan Chicken and Rice to Purina Pro
>> Plan Sensitive
> Skin
>> and Stomach due to a persistent sore on her right hind leg.
>>
>> She's back on Chicken and Rice dry food for the last five day, and is
>> eating and drinking ok. She hasn't vomited (thank goodness) and is
>> alert. The only problem is the diarrhea and the skin.
>>
>> The vet just recommended one quarter of a tablet of Pepto Bismol 2x a
>> day, but I'm reading all over the net that Pepto Bismol contains a
>> salicylate which is very harmful to cats and that Kaopectate is the
>> way to go.
>>
>>
>> Comments? Please!
>
>
>

MaryL
December 12th 05, 09:30 PM
> wrote in message
...
> As I had written, my mom's cat with the sore on her right hind leg
> developed diarrhea last Thursday. We thought it might be caused switching
> her from Purina Pro Plan Chicken and Rice to Purina Pro Plan Sensitive
> Skin
> and Stomach due to a persistent sore on her right hind leg.
>
> She's back on Chicken and Rice dry food for the last five day, and is
> eating and drinking ok. She hasn't vomited (thank goodness) and is alert.
> The only problem is the diarrhea and the skin.
>
> The vet just recommended one quarter of a tablet of Pepto Bismol 2x a day,
> but I'm reading all over the net that Pepto Bismol contains a salicylate
> which is very harmful to cats and that Kaopectate is the way to go.
>
>
> Comments? Please!

My vet recommends Immodium AD, and it worked very well. I used the pills.
He showed me how to shave one down and use only a tiny portion (about the
size of a BB). This was for a previous cat with IBD, and I eventually got
good enough with using a very sharp, narrow blade to "extract" several cat
doses from a single pill.

MaryL

Shirley
December 13th 05, 12:16 AM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> > wrote in message
> ...
>> As I had written, my mom's cat with the sore on her right hind leg
>> developed diarrhea last Thursday. We thought it might be caused
>> switching
>> her from Purina Pro Plan Chicken and Rice to Purina Pro Plan
>> Sensitive Skin
>> and Stomach due to a persistent sore on her right hind leg.
>>
>> She's back on Chicken and Rice dry food for the last five day, and
>> is
>> eating and drinking ok. She hasn't vomited (thank goodness) and is
>> alert.
>> The only problem is the diarrhea and the skin.
>>
>> The vet just recommended one quarter of a tablet of Pepto Bismol 2x
>> a day,
>> but I'm reading all over the net that Pepto Bismol contains a
>> salicylate
>> which is very harmful to cats and that Kaopectate is the way to go.
>>
>>
>> Comments? Please!
>
> My vet recommends Immodium AD, and it worked very well. I used the
> pills. He showed me how to shave one down and use only a tiny
> portion (about the size of a BB). This was for a previous cat with
> IBD, and I eventually got good enough with using a very sharp,
> narrow blade to "extract" several cat doses from a single pill.
>
> MaryL

I use Immodium syrup (approx 0.3ml per kilo of weight) and I mix it
with the cats wet food or use a syringe to squirt it into the cats
mouth.......it can cause hyperactivity particularly in kittens so
that's something to watch for.


--
Shirley
http://community.webshots.com/user/shirleycatuk

>
>

December 13th 05, 12:42 AM
"Shirley" > wrote in news:Tponf.18188
:

>
> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>
>> > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> As I had written, my mom's cat with the sore on her right hind leg
>>> developed diarrhea last Thursday. We thought it might be caused
>>> switching
>>> her from Purina Pro Plan Chicken and Rice to Purina Pro Plan
>>> Sensitive Skin
>>> and Stomach due to a persistent sore on her right hind leg.
>>>
>>> She's back on Chicken and Rice dry food for the last five day, and
>>> is
>>> eating and drinking ok. She hasn't vomited (thank goodness) and is
>>> alert.
>>> The only problem is the diarrhea and the skin.
>>>
>>> The vet just recommended one quarter of a tablet of Pepto Bismol 2x
>>> a day,
>>> but I'm reading all over the net that Pepto Bismol contains a
>>> salicylate
>>> which is very harmful to cats and that Kaopectate is the way to go.
>>>
>>>
>>> Comments? Please!
>>
>> My vet recommends Immodium AD, and it worked very well. I used the
>> pills. He showed me how to shave one down and use only a tiny
>> portion (about the size of a BB). This was for a previous cat with
>> IBD, and I eventually got good enough with using a very sharp,
>> narrow blade to "extract" several cat doses from a single pill.
>>
>> MaryL
>
> I use Immodium syrup (approx 0.3ml per kilo of weight) and I mix it
> with the cats wet food or use a syringe to squirt it into the cats
> mouth.......it can cause hyperactivity particularly in kittens so
> that's something to watch for.
>

So for a 9 pound cat that would be 1.22 ml (4.082 kg x .3ml) or 1 ml
rounded off). That's like .03 (3/100) of an ounce or (.2) 2/10 of a
teaspoon.
Sounds like a measured dropper is needed.

A physician friend of mine just suggested to feed the cat strained baby
food and a rice mixture (preferably baby portion) and let the diarrhea
take its course. He said it would probably go away on its own and avoid
anything with a salicylate content as they wouldn't even use it in
children.

Phil P.
December 13th 05, 01:03 PM
> wrote in message
...
> The ingredient is called subsalicylate
> (http://www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/nov03/031115b.asp) which is
> unfortunately now in Kaopectate, too!


Here's an article about Kaopectate from the Journal of the American
Veterinary Association:

"Kaopectate reformulation could be dangerous to cats."

http://www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/nov03/031115b.asp


Unfortunately, the use of most anti-diarrheal drugs are controversial and
potentially dangerous in cats- even loperamide because its an opiate
antidiarrheal. The safe dose for cats is so small that's its very easy to
overdose. Even the so-called "safe" dose of Pepto Bismol is really to low
to have any significant effect. So, the benefits don't offest the potential
risks.


> So what to do?


Diarrhea is a symptom of a disorder and not a diagnosis. Strictly
symptomatic treatment only masks the underlying reason for the diarrhea and
only delay its diagnosis. Its more important to find the cause of diarrhea
rather than just treat the symptoms. Fortunately, most cases of diarrhea in
cats is self-limiting and resolve by themselves without any drugs.

The most important thing to make sure of is that the cat stays well
hydrated. Diarrhea can not only cause critical dehydration but can also
predispose cats to crystals, uroliths and urinary tract obstructions- the
huge fecal water loss results in a lower urine volume and much higher
concentration of urinary solutes.

I usually make up a "stew" with warm water and cooked chicken or turkey
alone and feed that for a few days to provide the cat with plenty of water
and high-quality protein while giving the bowels a chance to rest. A
single-protein diet such as i/d can also help some cats. You can also try a
meat-based baby food- without onions. Feed a little at a time- several small
meals a day rather than fewer large meals so you don't overload the
digestive tract.

One other tid bit of advice learned from hard, unpleasant experience: Try
to avoid antibiotics unless bacterial or protozoan enteropathogens are
*actually* found in the poop. Antibiotis can have adverse effects on the
normal intestinal microflora and can actually promote diarrhea and
antibiotic-resistant bacteria.


>
> By the way, whis does w/d stand for and is this part of the Hills Science
> Diet family?

W/d is basically a weight-maintenance diet for cats prone to obesity. r/d
is a weight-reduction diet. W/d is also used in diabetic cats because the
higher slows glucose absorption for the gastrointestinal tract. W/d is also
used to treat diarrhea because the additional fiber absorbs colonic water.

Phil

Phil P.
December 13th 05, 01:14 PM
> wrote in message
...
> "Shirley" > wrote in news:Tponf.18188

> A physician friend of mine just suggested to feed the cat strained baby
> food and a rice mixture (preferably baby portion) and let the diarrhea
> take its course. He said it would probably go away on its own and avoid
> anything with a salicylate content as they wouldn't even use it in
> children.

That's very good advice. I agree wholeheartedly.

Phil

---MIKE---
December 13th 05, 02:32 PM
Phil P wrote:

>>Antibiotis can have adverse effects on
>> the normal intestinal microflora and
>> can actually promote diarrhea and
>> antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

Why don't you recommend adding acidolphulos powder to their food?


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

December 17th 05, 08:24 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in
ink.net:

>
> > wrote in message
> ...
>> The ingredient is called subsalicylate
>> (http://www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/nov03/031115b.asp) which is
>> unfortunately now in Kaopectate, too!
> >

> I usually make up a "stew" with warm water and cooked chicken or
> turkey alone and feed that for a few days to provide the cat with
> plenty of water and high-quality protein while giving the bowels a
> chance to rest.

Very good advice. I had posted the AMVA article link re:subsalicylates
earlier and further reading showed it would have been more dangerous in
my cat's case because she was on Prednisolone and Tresaderm.

The diarrhea subsided after a week and she's almost back to normal bowel
movements now. She went back to her Purina Pro Plan Chicken and Rice dry
food (and drank plenty of water), and for the last few days I've been
giving her Beechnut Beef and beef broth and Chicken and Chicken Broth -
which she loves. I know she can't stay on this diet, but I don't want to
put her back on Fancy Feast wet food. She's had a sore on her right hind
leg for over a year and after numerous treatments, the best guess is it's
either a granuloma or a food allergy.

(Phil - please see my next post on possible food suggestions)



>
> W/d is also used to treat diarrhea because the additional
> fiber absorbs colonic water.
>

Very interesting. One would have thought that a switch to Purina Pro
Plan Sensitive Skin and Stomach (from Chicken and Rice) wouldn't have
caused the diarrhea since it's higher in fiber content. Perhaps it was
just too sudden and one teaspoon at a time would have been better.

December 17th 05, 08:55 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in news:NOznf.4129$Dd2.2752
@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net:

> > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Shirley" > wrote in news:Tponf.18188
>
>> A physician friend of mine just suggested to feed the cat strained baby
>> food and a rice mixture (preferably baby portion) and let the diarrhea
>> take its course. He said it would probably go away on its own and avoid
>> anything with a salicylate content as they wouldn't even use it in
>> children.
>
> That's very good advice. I agree wholeheartedly.
>
> Phil

I took his advice and I couldn't be happier that I didn't listen to the vet
with the Pepto Bismol advice.

I think these newsgroups (as long as one can weed out the spam) are very
beneficial to pet owners. Hopefully, someone else can benefit from this
thread someday by doing a Google newsgroup search.

Thanks to all for their advice.

Phil P.
December 19th 05, 03:40 AM
> wrote in message
...
> "Phil P." > wrote in
> ink.net:
>
> >
> > > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> The ingredient is called subsalicylate
> >> (http://www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/nov03/031115b.asp) which is
> >> unfortunately now in Kaopectate, too!
> > >
>
> > I usually make up a "stew" with warm water and cooked chicken or
> > turkey alone and feed that for a few days to provide the cat with
> > plenty of water and high-quality protein while giving the bowels a
> > chance to rest.
>
> Very good advice. I had posted the AMVA article link re:subsalicylates
> earlier and further reading showed it would have been more dangerous in
> my cat's case because she was on Prednisolone and Tresaderm.
>
> The diarrhea subsided after a week and she's almost back to normal bowel
> movements now. She went back to her Purina Pro Plan Chicken and Rice dry
> food (and drank plenty of water), and for the last few days I've been
> giving her Beechnut Beef and beef broth and Chicken and Chicken Broth -
> which she loves. I know she can't stay on this diet, but I don't want to
> put her back on Fancy Feast wet food. She's had a sore on her right hind
> leg for over a year and after numerous treatments, the best guess is it's
> either a granuloma or a food allergy.
>
> (Phil - please see my next post on possible food suggestions)
>
>
>
> >
> > W/d is also used to treat diarrhea because the additional
> > fiber absorbs colonic water.
> >
>
> Very interesting. One would have thought that a switch to Purina Pro
> Plan Sensitive Skin and Stomach (from Chicken and Rice) wouldn't have
> caused the diarrhea since it's higher in fiber content.


Fiber works both ways: it helps diarrhea by absorbing colonic water and
firming up stools, and it helps constipation by absorbing colonic water and
softening stools. However, too much fiber can cause constipation.


Perhaps it was
> just too sudden and one teaspoon at a time would have been better.

Sure. Abrupt changes of diets can certainly cause diarrhea.

P.