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December 26th 05, 02:40 PM
No trying to troll or wind anyone up.
My 'opinion' is, everyone/thing needs a bit of company/interaction with
their own species, to be stimulated and healthy. In Uk there are cat
communities not consisting purely of feral cats, house cats that meet up at
night to play and do cat stuff, my male seems to hold court in the yard at
least once a week, they will be over the road one night, all over next doors
shed the other, they seem to meet, to socialise, sniff the cat nip, chase
the queens (mine's both neutered) The male will come home smelly and tired
then sleep all day.
Mr's T just sits up inside on a high window ( I have rigged her a vantage
point out of card board and tape) she sits peeping at the fuss below. They
live in colonies, they might grace us with company and accept some grub, but
they "become alive" with the gang, in the dark, and have a ball from what I
hear! Then they come back to sanctuary, a feed, a wash, a kip, then go do it
all again the next night.

That's the UK, no rabies or real predators as such, a few foxes no big cats
or packs of un fed dogs, the hunters dogs will rip up any small animal, but
that's in the countryside and people tend to lock down everything on hunt
days. Some cats have FIV, but mine and all sensible folk, have all the
injections money can buy and a chip to say where they belong. Most cats are
worth no money, most are street moggies, so don't get stolen for resale. The
posh breeds are kept indoors. Oh we don't de claw as most cat's live 1/2 and
1/2 inside outside, they obviously need to defend themselves, so we
encourage them to keep the claws very sharp by providing scratching posts
mats (manicure)

I can see why people keep the cat indoors, if there are Mountain lion or
Alligator around to eat her.
Here they are none.

---MIKE---
December 26th 05, 07:40 PM
JackKetch wrote:

>>I can see why people keep the cat
>> indoors, if there are Mountain lion or
>> Alligator around to eat her.
>>Here they are none.

Well, no alligators but we do have coyotes, bob cats, fishers, racoons,
and bears. Not safe (I lost Ike six years ago).


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

December 27th 05, 02:43 AM
wrote:
<snipped>
> I can see why people keep the cat indoors, if there are Mountain lion or
> Alligator around to eat her.
> Here they are none.

In the countryside there are often coyotes. Or other animals,
depending upon where in the U.S. one lives.

Right here, in a northeastern city, there are skunks, raccoons, &
rabbits - no big deal. But there *is* traffic, which is a big deal.
(One of my neighbor's cats was killed in the road when he was 2;
another neighbor's cat was killed/hit by a car when several months
old.) Therefore my cats are indoors, except for going out onto a
screened-in porch.

Cathy

December 27th 05, 08:54 PM
I live in austin Texas-but its growing so fast (makes me sad) all the
subdivisions are of course not planning on wild life relocation so the
coyotes (i cant spell) are walking around in broad daylight in peoples
yards. My friend lost her three kitties that way. So sad.
My cats are indoors except for badass Tuffy who adopted me about 5
years ago.
Sarah LIz

December 28th 05, 12:12 AM
wrote:
> My 'opinion' is, everyone/thing needs a bit of company/interaction with
> their own species, to be stimulated and healthy. In Uk there are cat
> communities not consisting purely of feral cats, house cats that meet up at
> night to play and do cat stuff, my male seems to hold court in the yard at
> least once a week, they will be over the road one night, all over next doors
> shed the other, they seem to meet, to socialise, sniff the cat nip, chase
> the queens (mine's both neutered) The male will come home smelly and tired
> then sleep all day.

That's nice if your cat is a social creature. Mine was like that as an
outside feral cat. But since brought indoors, she is often intolerant
of other cats to a marked degree. I let her out. Usually I supervise.
She usually comes in a half hour later by herself. If not, I go find
her and bring her in. Since she is a female, she seems only interested
in her immediate turf, her household, and does not stray. Fortunately,
there is enough open ground that she can sniff and eat grass and
torture the occasional mouse and not need to cross an open road. It's
been this way for three years. But you never know so I try to keep an
eye out in case she suddenly decides to explore some creek or copse.

chas
December 28th 05, 01:01 AM
I'm in the UK too - and we still have too many cats being killed by traffic
because people let them roam outdoors on our overcrowded roads.

chas

dgk
December 28th 05, 09:10 PM
On Mon, 26 Dec 2005 13:40:14 GMT, > wrote:

>No trying to troll or wind anyone up.
>My 'opinion' is, everyone/thing needs a bit of company/interaction with
>their own species, to be stimulated and healthy. In Uk there are cat
>communities not consisting purely of feral cats, house cats that meet up at
>night to play and do cat stuff, my male seems to hold court in the yard at
>least once a week, they will be over the road one night, all over next doors
>shed the other, they seem to meet, to socialise, sniff the cat nip, chase
>the queens (mine's both neutered) The male will come home smelly and tired
>then sleep all day.
....

I live in New York City and have fenced my small backyard so that the
boys can have some outdoor fun, but can't stroll off the property.
There is just too much traffic on the streets. Nipsy is a wuss and
comes running inside every few minutes, having heard a noise. Espy
will stay out until dark when I have to go and get him. This is
assuming that I'm home; they never go out unless I'm there. I've also
hooked up a camera that broadcasts to the TV in the computer room so
that I can keep an eye on them as I work.

It's winter now so I can't leave the door open, and that means that
Nipsy has to bang on the door so that I can let him in. When he was a
baby he was attacked by something and almost killed, which likely
explains why he is so scared of the outside. A friend of mine got him
fixed up and made me take him after Nico (the wonder cat) died.

I understand why folks in cities can't let their cats out. Most live
in apartments which makes it impossible. Others can't fence in the
whole property. And a cat outside in this traffic is quickly roadkill.
Not that there aren't quite a few cats around, but they likely don't
live too long. I know one woman who feeds ten on a regular basis.

Folks in other newsgroups might laugh, but one of the reasons that I
bought this house was because I lived in an apartment with no southern
(sun) exposure. I wanted my cats to at least have a spot that got some
sun. The mortgage wasn't much more than my rent and now is
considerably less than what people are paying in rent. And the house
has likely tripled in value. I owe my boys big time.