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December 29th 05, 01:25 AM
our cat is now six and has just lost his front leg after many months of
trying to save it, Please do they cope ? do they live for a long time
if you let them out ? i would really love to know mwe want to do whats
best. we love him

NMR
December 29th 05, 01:33 AM
Just because he lost his front leg does not mean he can't have a good
quality of life. There are cats and dogs out there that have lost both
their back legs and go around on a wheeled trailer. Animals adopt to what
ever is necessary just like humans do.

If your vet says he needs to be put down go seek a second opinion you have
had a friend for 6 years would you give up on a human friend just because
they lost a arm.


> wrote in message
ups.com...
> our cat is now six and has just lost his front leg after many months of
> trying to save it, Please do they cope ? do they live for a long time
> if you let them out ? i would really love to know mwe want to do whats
> best. we love him
>

December 29th 05, 01:39 AM
We are the owners of a rottie, who has both crucial ligaments paid for
and another cat , we would never dream of putting him to sleep ! what i
am so worried about is leaving him go back out . I love to know he is
asleep ay the bottom of my bed but the vet said because he is an
"outside" ! cat it will be cruel to keep him in for the next 10 or 12
years.

cybercat
December 29th 05, 01:42 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> We are the owners of a rottie, who has both crucial ligaments paid for
> and another cat , we would never dream of putting him to sleep ! what i
> am so worried about is leaving him go back out . I love to know he is
> asleep ay the bottom of my bed but the vet said because he is an
> "outside" ! cat it will be cruel to keep him in for the next 10 or 12
> years.
>

Your vet is wrong. Cats adjust quite well to the indoor life, and even come
to prefer it.
Both of my cats were outdoor cats and don't even try to get out any more.
You are not thinking about letting him out, are you?

NMR
December 29th 05, 01:44 AM
Your vet is way out of date and uninformed typical vet now adays. It is
far from cruel to keep an animals inside that you love. Specially now that
the cat is down to 3 legs think about other animals chasing it.
Here are a couple of links about the subject.

http://www.fanciers.com/cat-faqs/outside-world.shtml
This is Phil's site
http://www.maxshouse.com/outdoor_risks.htm

> wrote in message
oups.com...
> We are the owners of a rottie, who has both crucial ligaments paid for
> and another cat , we would never dream of putting him to sleep ! what i
> am so worried about is leaving him go back out . I love to know he is
> asleep ay the bottom of my bed but the vet said because he is an
> "outside" ! cat it will be cruel to keep him in for the next 10 or 12
> years.
>

olicat
December 29th 05, 01:56 AM
Not at all, oli was 8 wks old & had never been handled he"s my baby but
,he is desperate , three times he broke his leg ! my rottie is third in
line our two cats rule the roost but she cries when i dont let him out
because he does ! how do you solve that one !

cybercat
December 29th 05, 02:03 AM
"olicat" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Not at all, oli was 8 wks old & had never been handled he"s my baby but
> ,he is desperate , three times he broke his leg ! my rottie is third in
> line our two cats rule the roost but she cries when i dont let him out
> because he does ! how do you solve that one !
>

Ignore them and keep your cat inside and safe.

John Doe
December 29th 05, 02:31 AM
wrote:

> We are the owners of a rottie, who has both crucial ligaments paid
> for and another cat , we would never dream of putting him to sleep
> ! what i am so worried about is leaving him go back out . I love
> to know he is asleep ay the bottom of my bed but the vet said
> because he is an "outside" ! cat it will be cruel to keep him in
> for the next 10 or 12 years.

On the contrary, cruel would be to let it outside with only three
legs. If your dwelling were so small, how could you live in it?

If you want to feel better...

.... give it lots of stuff to climb on, carpeted two by fours are
good for that

.... give it a nice view and if possible a window (with a screen) at
least slightly open that it can smell the outdoors (if necessary,
you could just crack the window to prevent it from breaking through
the screen, my formerly outdoor/injured cat clearly loves to smell
what's on the outside

.... bring the outside sounds in with an infant room monitor
(currently, I am reevaluating this advice because it might cause
some nervous tension may be depending on factors like what sounds
the cat was used to in another neighborhood) unfortunately, we have
lots of dogs barking around here

Good luck.

MaryL
December 29th 05, 01:16 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> We are the owners of a rottie, who has both crucial ligaments paid for
> and another cat , we would never dream of putting him to sleep ! what i
> am so worried about is leaving him go back out . I love to know he is
> asleep ay the bottom of my bed but the vet said because he is an
> "outside" ! cat it will be cruel to keep him in for the next 10 or 12
> years.
>

Many vets know a great deal about the medical care of cats (that's what
they're trained for), but they may know very little about issues such as
indoors-outdoors. *Many* people have had success in acclimating a formerly
outdoor cat to become indoor-only. In your case, that would be essential --
and it is *not* cruel. I had a feral cat that eventually became a
wonderfully loving companion. He also became an indoor-only cat and at some
point lost all interest in the outdoors. All of my other cats have also
been indoor-only, but none had a formerly outdoor existence. Please google
to find some descriptions that may help you in this process.

MaryL

MaryL
December 29th 05, 01:20 PM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
> wrote:
>
> ... give it lots of stuff to climb on, carpeted two by fours are
> good for that
>
> >

Excellent advice! Give your cat lots of toys and items to climb on. A cat
tree would be a good investment. Since your cat will only have three legs,
it would probably be helpful to modify the cat tree (and other climbing
surfaces) by providing a carpeted slant access to the tree. You could also
get a set of carpeted steps (Drs. Foster and Smith have a variety of sizes)
to set beside a bed or sofa.

MaryL