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View Full Version : Teeth extraction - advice/experiences pls?


eden
January 20th 06, 08:42 PM
My cat is 13-ish. He had gingivitus about 5 years ago and 7 teeth out -
the vet said if it flared up again he would want to extract them all
which seems extreme and cruel to me. Gingivitus has flared up again,
(although he is eating fine and seems ok in himself) and I am loathe to
take him back because I know what will be advised. Apart from the whole
idea I'm concerned about anaestheics at his age plus the fact that he
is the most stressy cat I have ever had and panics like mad - (used to
quiet life with just me) - on the other hand I dont want him to be in
pain. Adivice and comments pls?

Shardonay
January 20th 06, 09:32 PM
eden wrote:
> My cat is 13-ish. He had gingivitus about 5 years ago and 7 teeth out -
> the vet said if it flared up again he would want to extract them all
> which seems extreme and cruel to me. Gingivitus has flared up again,
> (although he is eating fine and seems ok in himself) and I am loathe to
> take him back because I know what will be advised. Apart from the whole
> idea I'm concerned about anaestheics at his age plus the fact that he
> is the most stressy cat I have ever had and panics like mad - (used to
> quiet life with just me) - on the other hand I dont want him to be in
> pain. Adivice and comments pls?
>

Have his teeth cleaned - it's a $200 expense but it is necessary - and
then use Science Diet Oral Care kibble plus a dose of placque-fighting
liquid (forgot the name) in his water bowl. Also try to "brush" his
teeth wth kitty paste on your finger. Good luck!

JJ
January 20th 06, 09:52 PM
You have some options here -

1. YOu can get a second opinion.

2. YOu can follow your vet's advice.


I have a cat who had all her teeth removed and for her it was an
extremely positive thing as she was in a lot of pain with constantly
red and bleeding gums. She had horrible breath and the pain was
evident - she was depressed and not grooming well, she also had some
upper respiratory symptoms which my Veterinarian thought were linked to
her poor gum condition. So bad, that some teeth were even loose -

We had all teeth removed and it was perhaps the best thing we could
have done. She was given some pain medication for days after the
procedure - Also she was on anti-biotics several days prior to dental
extractions and I think she got an anti-biotic shot at the dentist
along with pain meds.

Some things to think about!

- Kitty should stay inside permanently - without teeth - cat should
never go outside again because if she were in danger he could not
defend himself nor good he hunt if needed food (if he got separated
from you)

ON the plus side without teeth:

1. No more bad breath and horrendous gum pain.
2. Kitty has much happier disposition - purrs more, is happier - since
feels better.

NO, I do not have to feed the kitty a different diet - she still eats
hard food - though she has gained some weight and I presume this has
occured because she swallows food whole now...

I feed a blend of two foods - Nutro Natural Choice (use the senior
formula - with smaller size kibble) and Cat Chow indoor formula (very
small kibble)

Also a kitty without teeth needs help grooming and must have immaculate
flea prevention because kitty will no longer be able to bite itself
when groom.

One more good thing is that positive dental health has a correlation to
better long-term kidney function and for male cats can reduce urinary
issues....

Good luck - hope this helps - Cheers, jen

January 21st 06, 01:36 AM
I would definitely have his teeth removed. My kitty lived to 20 years
and 3 months and I wished that at age 16 I would have had his teeth
removed. Nothing but trouble when they get older and after 16 forget
about anaestheics. Do it now, if you are having trouble.
Sharon

Wendy
January 22nd 06, 06:02 PM
"JJ" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> You have some options here -
>
>
> One more good thing is that positive dental health has a correlation to
> better long-term kidney function and for male cats can reduce urinary
> issues....
>
> Good luck - hope this helps - Cheers, jen
>

Just curious what the correlation is between dental health and urinary
issues in particular?

W

Toni
January 22nd 06, 08:37 PM
"Wendy" > wrote in message
...
> >
>
> Just curious what the correlation is between dental health and urinary
> issues in particular?
>


Not urinary issues exactly, but kidney issues.
A mouth full of tartar is full of nasty bacteria as well. Every time the
animal swallows toxic bacteria are swallowed and enter the bloodstream.
Our kidneys serve as filters to remove dangerous things from our
bloodstreams- the liver acts similarly. So an overload of toxic bacteria
causes the liver and kidneys to have to work extra hard to filter out the
impurities.
Over time the strain on organs can become substantial.

(nutshell version)
--
Toni
http://www.irish-wolfhounds.com

John Doe
January 24th 06, 01:10 AM
"JJ" <jengoolsby gmail.com> wrote:


>
> ON the plus side without teeth:

>
> NO, I do not have to feed the kitty a different diet - she still
> eats hard food - though she has gained some weight and I presume
> this has occured because she swallows food whole now...

There are lots worse things going on in the world, I guess you have
your reasons.








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> From: "JJ" <jengoolsby gmail.com>
> Newsgroups: rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> Subject: Re: Teeth extraction - advice/experiences pls?
> Date: 20 Jan 2006 13:52:53 -0800
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dgk
January 24th 06, 02:59 PM
On 20 Jan 2006 12:42:49 -0800, "eden" > wrote:

>My cat is 13-ish. He had gingivitus about 5 years ago and 7 teeth out -
>the vet said if it flared up again he would want to extract them all
>which seems extreme and cruel to me. Gingivitus has flared up again,
>(although he is eating fine and seems ok in himself) and I am loathe to
>take him back because I know what will be advised. Apart from the whole
>idea I'm concerned about anaestheics at his age plus the fact that he
>is the most stressy cat I have ever had and panics like mad - (used to
>quiet life with just me) - on the other hand I dont want him to be in
>pain. Adivice and comments pls?

I adopted a very old cat that had major dental problems, in fact the
vet specialist said that she was either allergic to her own teeth or
to the bacteria that couldn't be defeated because it was under the gum
line. She had infections and the saddest look on any cat that I've
ever seen.

At their recommendation I had all of her teeth pulled, including some
that were broken off below the gum line. After a few days she actually
looked almost happy. It didn't bother her eating; in fact she was
barely eating before the operation and she put on some weight after
it. I had to have her put to sleep a few months later because of a
tumor in her ear, but she was vastly improved during those months.

I think it might be premature in your case if he is eating fine but
that is up to the vets. Get a second opinion but the cat will get
along fine although he might drool a bit.

Here's a link to what Jackie was like after the operation (it is very
slow since it's running on my home computer and it's busy doing other
stuff).
http://sonicechoes.gotdns.org/jackie/