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J.G.
January 23rd 06, 06:59 PM
I have a question that I'm hoping someone knows the answer to! I
apologize in advance for the long-winded explanation.

I have two cats - one is a 5 year old domestic medium hair, and the
other is a 9 month old Ragdoll. They get along great, and the younger
arrival has definitely improved the life of the older one.

There is one thing that I can't figure out, however. Whenever my
fiance or I leave our home, the older cat will run over to the younger
one and bite him on the back of the neck. He'll even come running out
of his cat tree to do it. He doesn't seem to be mounting him, he just
sort of comes at him from behind on an angle. He sort of holds him
there for a few minutes before letting go (or the younger one finally
decides to roll over to get him off). It doesn't seem to be hurting
the Ragdoll, who seems to just lay there quietly while he does it. Its
like clockwork - we can shut the door, and reopen it 15 seconds later
to see the older cat holding down the younger one.

This sometimes happens at other times, usually at night when we're in
the bedroom and they're in another room. We'll hear the usual "war
cry" that the older one makes before doing this strange action.

We can't figure out why he's doing this! Its almost like he's trying
to preven the younger one from joining us out the door? Has anyone
else seen this strange behaviour?

Thanks,
J

NMR
January 23rd 06, 07:37 PM
"J.G." > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I have a question that I'm hoping someone knows the answer to! I
> apologize in advance for the long-winded explanation.
>
> I have two cats - one is a 5 year old domestic medium hair, and the
> other is a 9 month old Ragdoll. They get along great, and the younger
> arrival has definitely improved the life of the older one.
>
> There is one thing that I can't figure out, however. Whenever my
> fiance or I leave our home, the older cat will run over to the younger
> one and bite him on the back of the neck. He'll even come running out
> of his cat tree to do it. He doesn't seem to be mounting him, he just
> sort of comes at him from behind on an angle. He sort of holds him
> there for a few minutes before letting go (or the younger one finally
> decides to roll over to get him off). It doesn't seem to be hurting
> the Ragdoll, who seems to just lay there quietly while he does it. Its
> like clockwork - we can shut the door, and reopen it 15 seconds later
> to see the older cat holding down the younger one.
>
> This sometimes happens at other times, usually at night when we're in
> the bedroom and they're in another room. We'll hear the usual "war
> cry" that the older one makes before doing this strange action.
>
> We can't figure out why he's doing this! Its almost like he's trying
> to preven the younger one from joining us out the door? Has anyone
> else seen this strange behaviour?
>
> Thanks,
> J
>

Dominance the older one is trying to prove it
The younger one is allowing it for now but wait till he decide he has had
enough
as long as the older one lets go when the younger shakes him off no problem
but when he doesn't you need to step in and deal with the problem

J.G.
January 23rd 06, 10:31 PM
For some reason, I never once thought of that. It makes perfect sense,
though. He only does it when we either leave our home, or when we're
in bed and they're left alone in another room. He has also done it
when the younger one is doing something "annoying" like banging a
cupboard door as he tries to open it.

The strange thing is that he doesn't seem to be hurting him. The bite
seems to be firm, but the younger one doesn't seem bothered by it.

At 9 months, the Ragdoll is already the size of the 5 year old. He's
going to be a whopper in another year or two. Due to his placid
nature, however, I can't see him fighting back at all.

NMR
January 23rd 06, 10:35 PM
"J.G." > wrote in message
ups.com...
> For some reason, I never once thought of that. It makes perfect sense,
> though. He only does it when we either leave our home, or when we're
> in bed and they're left alone in another room. He has also done it
> when the younger one is doing something "annoying" like banging a
> cupboard door as he tries to open it.
>
> The strange thing is that he doesn't seem to be hurting him. The bite
> seems to be firm, but the younger one doesn't seem bothered by it.
>
> At 9 months, the Ragdoll is already the size of the 5 year old. He's
> going to be a whopper in another year or two. Due to his placid
> nature, however, I can't see him fighting back at all.
>

Just wait our youngest was having this done by the oldest till he got
bigger now he give the older one hell on wheels for doing it to him. No
rest for the wicked

Toni
January 23rd 06, 10:41 PM
"J.G." > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> The strange thing is that he doesn't seem to be hurting him. The bite
> seems to be firm, but the younger one doesn't seem bothered by it.
>


It's not meant to hurt- just intimidate.
It's cat language- as long as *they* understand each other all is well.

And for the future- I'm not one for interfering in dominance struggles- that
only prolongs the battle. Let them work it out unless there is actual
bloodshed, which is rare. It's all noise and posturing.


--
Toni
http://www.irish-wolfhounds.com

J.G.
January 23rd 06, 11:09 PM
It will definitely be interesting to see how this plays out as they get
older.

The two of them get along extremely well - all playing, no fighting.
This is the only behaviour of this type that either of them show to
eachother. Very fascinating!

January 24th 06, 03:43 AM
I have an exceedingly dominant female who insists on this behaviour
with two kittens we took in.

For the past 2.5 years, one of the kittens has submitted to her "pins"
and they get along very well.

The other began to dislike it at about 1.5 years of age and shook off
the dominant female. Now the Dominant Female will not allow this
kitten to share her pillow with her and will not groom her the way she
grooms the submissive one. The dominant female and the more assertive
kitten do not touch, while the submissive kitten lies right up against
the dominant female, who pins her in between groomings to prove her
superior position.

Our dominant female has never drawn blood from either kitten and so we
let it go as feline communication...

--Fil