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Wayne
January 27th 06, 09:01 PM
My wife and I are retired and our cat recently died and we want to get
another. We have had several in the past years and we really want an
affectionate cat that will sit on our laps while we watch TV or read. Not
all cats will do this, some are friendly but skittish and will not sit on
your lap and don't like to be held.

Our kids want to get us a kitten (specifically a main coon) but I am afraid
that if we get a kitten we don't know how it will be when it matures. I am
thinking that adopting a mature cat from the SPCA (Humane Society here in
Canada) might allow us to see first hand if a specific cat is acting they
way we want.
I have been told that there is a critical socialization period when the
kitten is small that can be used to influence it's behaviour but don't know
what we have to do to produce the desired behaviour.

We don't care about breeding or size-- just temperament

Can you offer some advice?
Thanks
Wayne in Ottawa

NMR
January 27th 06, 09:31 PM
"Wayne" > wrote in message
...
> My wife and I are retired and our cat recently died and we want to get
> another. We have had several in the past years and we really want an
> affectionate cat that will sit on our laps while we watch TV or read. Not
> all cats will do this, some are friendly but skittish and will not sit on
> your lap and don't like to be held.
>
> Our kids want to get us a kitten (specifically a main coon) but I am
> afraid that if we get a kitten we don't know how it will be when it
> matures. I am thinking that adopting a mature cat from the SPCA (Humane
> Society here in Canada) might allow us to see first hand if a specific cat
> is acting they way we want.
> I have been told that there is a critical socialization period when the
> kitten is small that can be used to influence it's behaviour but don't
> know what we have to do to produce the desired behaviour.
>
> We don't care about breeding or size-- just temperament
>
> Can you offer some advice?
> Thanks
> Wayne in Ottawa


Wayne almost any shelter will gladly let you spend some time with a mature
cat. Check out in your area to see if there is a no kill shelter and talk
to he workers they should be able to tell you how the cats are. At our
shelter in Florida we have a play room that people can see the cats up
close.

CatNipped
January 27th 06, 09:46 PM
"Wayne" > wrote in message
...
> My wife and I are retired and our cat recently died and we want to get
> another. We have had several in the past years and we really want an
> affectionate cat that will sit on our laps while we watch TV or read. Not
> all cats will do this, some are friendly but skittish and will not sit on
> your lap and don't like to be held.
>
> Our kids want to get us a kitten (specifically a main coon) but I am
> afraid that if we get a kitten we don't know how it will be when it
> matures. I am thinking that adopting a mature cat from the SPCA (Humane
> Society here in Canada) might allow us to see first hand if a specific cat
> is acting they way we want.
> I have been told that there is a critical socialization period when the
> kitten is small that can be used to influence it's behaviour but don't
> know what we have to do to produce the desired behaviour.
>
> We don't care about breeding or size-- just temperament

Maine Coons like to hang out in the same room with you, but they *DON'T*
like being held - definitely not a lap cat if that is what you're looking
for. I'd agree you should get a cat that's at least 1 or 2 years old if you
want to know what their temperment is like (and you'd also be saving a
life - everyone adopts kittens and lots of very delightful adult cats are
euthanized because everyone is looking to adopt a kitten and overlook adult
cats).

--

Hugs,

CatNipped

See all my masters at: http://www.PossiblePlaces.com/CatNipped/



>
> Can you offer some advice?
> Thanks
> Wayne in Ottawa
>

Gail
January 27th 06, 09:57 PM
Yes, adopt an adult cat. People at the shelters know their personalities and
can tell you all about them. You can also go to www.petfinder.com and look
in your area for cats available in shelters or in rescue groups.
Gail
"CatNipped" > wrote in message
...
> "Wayne" > wrote in message
> ...
>> My wife and I are retired and our cat recently died and we want to get
>> another. We have had several in the past years and we really want an
>> affectionate cat that will sit on our laps while we watch TV or read. Not
>> all cats will do this, some are friendly but skittish and will not sit on
>> your lap and don't like to be held.
>>
>> Our kids want to get us a kitten (specifically a main coon) but I am
>> afraid that if we get a kitten we don't know how it will be when it
>> matures. I am thinking that adopting a mature cat from the SPCA (Humane
>> Society here in Canada) might allow us to see first hand if a specific
>> cat is acting they way we want.
>> I have been told that there is a critical socialization period when the
>> kitten is small that can be used to influence it's behaviour but don't
>> know what we have to do to produce the desired behaviour.
>>
>> We don't care about breeding or size-- just temperament
>
> Maine Coons like to hang out in the same room with you, but they *DON'T*
> like being held - definitely not a lap cat if that is what you're looking
> for. I'd agree you should get a cat that's at least 1 or 2 years old if
> you want to know what their temperment is like (and you'd also be saving a
> life - everyone adopts kittens and lots of very delightful adult cats are
> euthanized because everyone is looking to adopt a kitten and overlook
> adult cats).
>
> --
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped
>
> See all my masters at: http://www.PossiblePlaces.com/CatNipped/
>
>
>
>>
>> Can you offer some advice?
>> Thanks
>> Wayne in Ottawa
>>
>
>

January 27th 06, 10:10 PM
Wayne wrote:
> My wife and I are retired and our cat recently died and we want to get
> another. We have had several in the past years and we really want an
> affectionate cat that will sit on our laps while we watch TV or read. Not
> all cats will do this, some are friendly but skittish and will not sit on
> your lap and don't like to be held.
>
> Our kids want to get us a kitten (specifically a main coon) but I am afraid
> that if we get a kitten we don't know how it will be when it matures. I am
> thinking that adopting a mature cat from the SPCA (Humane Society here in
> Canada) might allow us to see first hand if a specific cat is acting they
> way we want.
> I have been told that there is a critical socialization period when the
> kitten is small that can be used to influence it's behaviour but don't know
> what we have to do to produce the desired behaviour.
>
> We don't care about breeding or size-- just temperament
>
> Can you offer some advice?
> Thanks
> Wayne in Ottawa

January 27th 06, 10:16 PM
Wayne

We had to have our 20+ yr. old kitty put to sleep about a year ago. I
THOUGHT I wanted a kitten when I went out to look last spring. I went
to an area cat shelter and there was a 3-year old Maine Coon that just
took my heart right away. I am SO glad I didn't get a kitten - I am
not used to all that energy after 20 years with my other kitty.

My 3 year old is plenty playful. And yes, Maine Coons are not lap
cats, but they sit beside you and are following you all day. They love
to be with you - on the desk by the computer, etc. They are the most
gentle, funny, well behaved, intellegent cats I have ever had. And
this is my first Maine Coon. I keep wondering why I hadn't discovered
them before!

Maine Coons are great!
Sharon

PawsForThought
January 27th 06, 10:24 PM
Wayne wrote:
> My wife and I are retired and our cat recently died and we want to get
> another. We have had several in the past years and we really want an
> affectionate cat that will sit on our laps while we watch TV or read. Not
> all cats will do this, some are friendly but skittish and will not sit on
> your lap and don't like to be held.
>
> Our kids want to get us a kitten (specifically a main coon) but I am afraid
> that if we get a kitten we don't know how it will be when it matures. I am
> thinking that adopting a mature cat from the SPCA (Humane Society here in
> Canada) might allow us to see first hand if a specific cat is acting they
> way we want.

Hi Wayne,
I suppose handling a kitten a lot might influence whether or not it's a
lap cat, I don't know. We got lucky because both our cats will lay on
our laps, although they are quite energetic too. In your situation, I
would recommend adopting an adult cat, and preferably two of them. I
think you'd have a better idea in how they interact with humans and
each other. But don't forget, they will be in a new setting so might
act differently.

January 27th 06, 10:42 PM
Wayne

Here are a couple pictures of my funny, loveable adopted Maine Coon.

http://freepages.family.rootsweb.com/~colonialamerica/1.jpg

http://freepages.family.rootsweb.com/~colonialamerica/2.jpg

http://freepages.family.rootsweb.com/~colonialamerica/3.jpg

What's not to love?!
Sharon

Joe Canuck
January 27th 06, 10:42 PM
Wayne wrote:

> My wife and I are retired and our cat recently died and we want to get
> another. We have had several in the past years and we really want an
> affectionate cat that will sit on our laps while we watch TV or read. Not
> all cats will do this, some are friendly but skittish and will not sit on
> your lap and don't like to be held.
>
> Our kids want to get us a kitten (specifically a main coon) but I am afraid
> that if we get a kitten we don't know how it will be when it matures. I am
> thinking that adopting a mature cat from the SPCA (Humane Society here in
> Canada) might allow us to see first hand if a specific cat is acting they
> way we want.
> I have been told that there is a critical socialization period when the
> kitten is small that can be used to influence it's behaviour but don't know
> what we have to do to produce the desired behaviour.
>
> We don't care about breeding or size-- just temperament
>
> Can you offer some advice?
> Thanks
> Wayne in Ottawa
>
>

It is very hard to tell the personality of a cat you will get from the
SPCA. The major problem being that their personality won't truly emerge
until they get comfortable and settle in. Best to communicate with the
staff about what you are looking for, they may have some insight into
the pets they have.

If you do decide on purebred... I have a Ragdoll breed cat that is just
wonderful. Very sweet, laid back and loving... and many of them are lap
cats.

I'm in the Ottawa area as well. I had good success with a tuxedo cat I
got from the SPCA and also good luck with a Ragdoll from a breeder.

That breeder... http://www.fancyrags.com/

As per her website, she has a kitten available right now.

-L.
January 27th 06, 10:58 PM
Wayne wrote:
> My wife and I are retired and our cat recently died and we want to get
> another. We have had several in the past years and we really want an
> affectionate cat that will sit on our laps while we watch TV or read. Not
> all cats will do this, some are friendly but skittish and will not sit on
> your lap and don't like to be held.
>
> Our kids want to get us a kitten (specifically a main coon) but I am afraid
> that if we get a kitten we don't know how it will be when it matures. I am
> thinking that adopting a mature cat from the SPCA (Humane Society here in
> Canada) might allow us to see first hand if a specific cat is acting they
> way we want.

Excellent idea!

> I have been told that there is a critical socialization period when the
> kitten is small that can be used to influence it's behaviour but don't know
> what we have to do to produce the desired behaviour.
>
> We don't care about breeding or size-- just temperament
>
> Can you offer some advice?
> Thanks
> Wayne in Ottawa

All I can tell you is what has worked for me in selecting cats for
myself and helping others select cats as a volunteer at the Humane
Society and as a vet tech. Adult cats may or may not display their
true temperment while in a shelter - but you can pretty much bet that
if a kitty is laid-back and likes to be handled while at the shelter,
that the cat truly is that way most of the time.

As for kittens, my test has always been to pick the kitten up, and hold
it on its back, like a baby. If it lays back and relaxes in your
hands, and lets you rub its belly, it has likely been handled as a
younger kitten and will be a love bug if you continue to treat it as
one. My experience has also been that neutered male cats are more
tolerant of receiving affection when the human wants to give it than
females; females tend to want to cuddle on their own terms.

IMO, you cannot go wrong with a black or black-and-white tuxedo male
kitten selected in the manner stated above. While some people do not
believe in color traits linking to behavior, I have seen enough
anecdotal evidence that I believe some personality traits are
color-linked. This especially holds true for calicos and torties,
orange males, black males, and black-and-white tux males.

Also, the workers and volunteers at the SPCA or HS where you visit
should be able to help match you with a cat that is likely to be a
"good fit".

Good luck and let us know what you decide!

-L.

Claude V. Lucas
January 27th 06, 11:16 PM
In article >,
Wayne > wrote:
>My wife and I are retired and our cat recently died and we want to get
>another. We have had several in the past years and we really want an
>affectionate cat that will sit on our laps while we watch TV or read. Not
>all cats will do this, some are friendly but skittish and will not sit on
>your lap and don't like to be held.
>
>Our kids want to get us a kitten (specifically a main coon) but I am afraid
>that if we get a kitten we don't know how it will be when it matures. I am
>thinking that adopting a mature cat from the SPCA (Humane Society here in
>Canada) might allow us to see first hand if a specific cat is acting they
>way we want.
> I have been told that there is a critical socialization period when the
>kitten is small that can be used to influence it's behaviour but don't know
>what we have to do to produce the desired behaviour.
>
>We don't care about breeding or size-- just temperament
>
>Can you offer some advice?
>Thanks
>Wayne in Ottawa
>
>

It's tough to go wrong with a Maine Coon as far as disposition goes,
although my Bubba is more of a sit-on-the-couch-next-to cat than he
is a lap cat. That's mainly because he's too big for my lap, but I've
also heard that many Maine Coons are like that anyway. He's not at all
skittish with people and always likes to visit with guests. I got him
from my local shelter and when I was looking at all the cats to pick
one he seemed to show the most interest in me, which is why I picked
him over the others. I really wasn't looking for a specific breed
either...


Claude

Annie Wxill
January 28th 06, 12:45 AM
"Wayne" > wrote in message
...
....> We don't care about breeding or size-- just temperament
>
> Can you offer some advice?
> Thanks
> Wayne in Ottawa


Condolences on the loss of your cat.

You might look for a cat or pair of cats who have lived with a retired
person who is moving to a care center and can't take them along.

Annie

Wayne
January 28th 06, 02:52 AM
Thanks everyone. Looks like the consensus is adopt an older cat.
Hre's another related question Is there any advantage if it's male or
female?
Wayne

Gail
January 28th 06, 03:19 AM
I think personality is more important.
Gail
"Wayne" > wrote in message
...
> Thanks everyone. Looks like the consensus is adopt an older cat.
> Hre's another related question Is there any advantage if it's male or
> female?
> Wayne
>

cybercat
January 28th 06, 04:10 AM
"Wayne" > wrote in message
...
> Thanks everyone. Looks like the consensus is adopt an older cat.
> Hre's another related question Is there any advantage if it's male or
> female?
> Wayne
>
>

Get the one that picks you out at the shelter! My Gracie just leaned into my
hand when I reached toward her and I was in love. This common looking little
7-lb tabbie, long legged, ridiculously long tail held high like the mast of
a tallship
while she zooms around ... 2 years old when I adopted her ... has become the
most delightful cat I have ever known.

January 28th 06, 07:07 AM
Wayne wrote:
> Thanks everyone. Looks like the consensus is adopt an older cat.
> Hre's another related question Is there any advantage if it's male or
> female?
> Wayne

I have found males to be more affectionate when *we* want them to be.
Females tend to be affectionate on *their* terms.
-L.

January 28th 06, 08:44 AM
I volunteer at a no-kill (low-kill) shelter and I could set anybody up
with an adult lap cat if they wanted one. I don't have any problem
determinging the personality of a shelter cat, at all, and lapcat-ness
is one of the easiest traits to ascertain. A good way to go is that
kind fo shelter where the cats have been there for a while and the
folks know them and they can steer you towards the kind of cat that
appeals to you. I would never suggest buying a purebred kitten, and
especially not with an eye to determining a certain kind of temperament
in advance. IMHO, that's not fair to the kitten or you.

January 28th 06, 11:12 AM
Males are more affectionate than females. I also think that shelter
kitties are more affectionate. They appreciate the fact that you got
them out of there. We adopted our 3 yr. old Maine Coon a year ago and
he still just walks around purring. He isn't at all interested in
running out the door. He is simply happy to have a home.

My kitty picked me out at the shelter. You will know when you find the
right one. It took me about 4 trips until I found Buddy.

Joe Canuck
January 28th 06, 12:49 PM
wrote:

> Wayne wrote:
>
>>Thanks everyone. Looks like the consensus is adopt an older cat.
>>Hre's another related question Is there any advantage if it's male or
>>female?
>>Wayne
>
>
> I have found males to be more affectionate when *we* want them to be.
> Females tend to be affectionate on *their* terms.
> -L.
>

This holds true for all species... not just felines. :-D

cybercat
January 28th 06, 04:54 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> Males are more affectionate than females. I also think that shelter
> kitties are more affectionate. They appreciate the fact that you got
> them out of there.

I have to say, some females are just as affectionate but on their own
terms--my Gracie does not want to be picked up, but she seeks me
out by creeping up when I am in bed and beginning a series of little
questioning meows--first she peers at me to see if I am asleep, then
she walks all the way down to the foot of the bed, around the other
side of me, does a stretchy "greet" (you know, where they meow,
extend both paws, yawn while doing the bat ear thing?) and once I
open my arms (I am on my side) she stretches out beside me, her
skinny little stripey body flush with mine and flat as a filet and
waits to be petted and cooed at. I think that is just as good as
having a big old plushy toy cat. :) That said, I have never had a male
cat to compare her to.

As for the second thing--yes, shelter cats are grateful, it is at once
sweet and heartrending. The first thing she did was just stretch and
stretch--it had been crowded at the shelter and when I met her
a big old tom was crowding into her donut bed and she had a
pained expression on her pointy little face. :)