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Badass Scotsman
January 28th 06, 10:12 AM
Hello,

We took Tango, our 1 yr old male cat to the vet yesterday, and we have been
told he has Restrictive Cardiomyopathy. She says it does not seem too bad
at the moment, but that it will almost certainly shorten his life.

My Fiancé Claire is devastated beyond belief. She has an incredibly strong
bond with Tango, almost like a mother and her baby. Tango follows her
everywhere, at bed time, Tango curls up under the covers and purrs beside
her. Each morning around 4am, he likes to sook on the edge of Claire's top
and purr even louder, they are inseparable...she has been in tears on and
off since the vet, and is not coping very well with the prospects of loosing
her baby boy. I too am extremely upset, and very angry - he is the sweetest
cat in the world, and irreplaceable.

The VET was very cagey with us and refused to go into timescales of any
sort, with the exception of saying his life will be shortened. Is there an
average survival statistic? Does anyone here have personal experiences that
they could share?

I do not want to be given false hope, whilst it might upset us, I would like
to know the absolute harsh reality of Tango's situation to allow both myself
and Claire to prepare for any potential loss.

Hope someone can help,

Regards,

Gary.

Toni
January 28th 06, 10:30 AM
"Badass Scotsman" > wrote in message
...
> Hello,
>
> We took Tango, our 1 yr old male cat to the vet yesterday, and we have
been
> told he has Restrictive Cardiomyopathy. She says it does not seem too bad
> at the moment, but that it will almost certainly shorten his life.
>


First thing to do is have a cardiologist take a look.
Your vet was cagey most likely because he didn't have answers for you.

http://www.vmth.ucdavis.edu/cardio/cases/case36/text.htm


--
Toni
http://www.irish-wolfhounds.com

alt4
January 28th 06, 06:34 PM
In other words if I'm reading it right, see a second vet.

--
If you object to logging, try plastic toilet
paper and towels.
"Badass Scotsman" > wrote in message
...
> Hello,
>
> We took Tango, our 1 yr old male cat to the vet yesterday, and we have
> been told he has Restrictive Cardiomyopathy. She says it does not seem
> too bad at the moment, but that it will almost certainly shorten his life.
>
> My Fiancé Claire is devastated beyond belief. She has an incredibly
> strong bond with Tango, almost like a mother and her baby. Tango follows
> her everywhere, at bed time, Tango curls up under the covers and purrs
> beside her. Each morning around 4am, he likes to sook on the edge of
> Claire's top and purr even louder, they are inseparable...she has been in
> tears on and off since the vet, and is not coping very well with the
> prospects of loosing her baby boy. I too am extremely upset, and very
> angry - he is the sweetest cat in the world, and irreplaceable.
>
> The VET was very cagey with us and refused to go into timescales of any
> sort, with the exception of saying his life will be shortened. Is there
> an average survival statistic? Does anyone here have personal experiences
> that they could share?
>
> I do not want to be given false hope, whilst it might upset us, I would
> like to know the absolute harsh reality of Tango's situation to allow both
> myself and Claire to prepare for any potential loss.
>
> Hope someone can help,
>
> Regards,
>
> Gary.
>

cybercat
January 28th 06, 10:13 PM
"alt4" > wrote in message
...
> In other words if I'm reading it right, see a second vet.
>

That is what my common sense tells me.

-L.
January 29th 06, 04:44 AM
Badass Scotsman wrote:
> Hello,
>
> We took Tango, our 1 yr old male cat to the vet yesterday, and we have been
> told he has Restrictive Cardiomyopathy. She says it does not seem too bad
> at the moment, but that it will almost certainly shorten his life.
>

What were his symptoms and what tests were done to determine that it
was restrictive CM and not hypertrophic CM? Has the cat had any major
illnesses or infections in the past? Is this a purebred cat? One
reason I ask is because sometimes cats with HCM will develop RCM late
in the disease.


> My Fiancé Claire is devastated beyond belief. She has an incredibly strong
> bond with Tango, almost like a mother and her baby. Tango follows her
> everywhere, at bed time, Tango curls up under the covers and purrs beside
> her. Each morning around 4am, he likes to sook on the edge of Claire's top
> and purr even louder, they are inseparable...she has been in tears on and
> off since the vet, and is not coping very well with the prospects of loosing
> her baby boy. I too am extremely upset, and very angry - he is the sweetest
> cat in the world, and irreplaceable.
>
> The VET was very cagey with us and refused to go into timescales of any
> sort, with the exception of saying his life will be shortened. Is there an
> average survival statistic? Does anyone here have personal experiences that
> they could share?

It is always case-dependant - that's why your vet can't give you any
stats. Survival will depend on how advanced the disease is, what has
caused it, the overall condition of the cat, and whether or not the
symptoms can be controlled. Cats with RCM can present with a myriad of
symptoms which may include (among others) shortness of breath, cough,
paralysis due to blood clots, weakness in limbs, general fatigue. Some
symptoms such as shortness of breath and cough can be controlled,
others cannot. There is no known cure (humans with RCM require heart
transplants).

>
> I do not want to be given false hope, whilst it might upset us, I would like
> to know the absolute harsh reality of Tango's situation to allow both myself
> and Claire to prepare for any potential loss.

I would be sure to get an ultrasound of the heart of you have not done
so. The truth is, these things can go for years without causing major
symptoms, and in other cases, the cat deteriorates fairly rapidly.
Finding out how advanced the disease is can give you some idea of
prognosis, but determining that can be difficult. A veterinary
cardiologists will probably run more tests to give you more answers,
but I doubt any vet will give you a timeline, if that's what you are
seeking.

My advice would be to educate yourself as much as you can about this
disease in felines, make him as comfortable as possible and love him as
much as you can. If this is a purebred cat you need to notify the
breeder immediately and let him or her know that you cat has developed
this disease, as he or she needs to stop breeding that line.

-L.

Phil P.
January 29th 06, 05:12 AM
"Badass Scotsman" > wrote in message
...
> Hello,
>
> We took Tango, our 1 yr old male cat to the vet yesterday, and we have
been
> told he has Restrictive Cardiomyopathy. She says it does not seem too bad
> at the moment, but that it will almost certainly shorten his life.
>
> My Fiancé Claire is devastated beyond belief. She has an incredibly
strong
> bond with Tango, almost like a mother and her baby. Tango follows her
> everywhere, at bed time, Tango curls up under the covers and purrs beside
> her. Each morning around 4am, he likes to sook on the edge of Claire's
top
> and purr even louder, they are inseparable...she has been in tears on and
> off since the vet, and is not coping very well with the prospects of
loosing
> her baby boy. I too am extremely upset, and very angry - he is the
sweetest
> cat in the world, and irreplaceable.
>
> The VET was very cagey with us and refused to go into timescales of any
> sort, with the exception of saying his life will be shortened.

I don't think your vet was being cagey- RCM a complicated disease. RCM is
not as easily diagnosed or treated as HCM or DCM due to the endocardial
fibrosis. How was your cat diagnosed? Did your vet perform an
echocardiogram?

If I were you, I'd consult a veterinary cardiologist. Go to
http://www.acvim.org/Specialist/Search.aspx and do a search for an internal
medicine Diplomate/Cardiologist in your area. American College of Veterinary
Internal Medicine Diplomates are about the best there is.


If you can't find an ACVIM cardiologist in your area, my second choice would
be an ABVP Diplomate/Feline Specialist (American Board of Veterinary
Practitioners).

Go to http://www.abvp.com/finddiplomate.aspx

Best of luck,

Phil

Dr.Carla,DVM
January 29th 06, 11:59 PM
Definitely see a veterinary cardiologist who can schedule your cat for a
echocardiogram (an ultrasound of the heart) and start him on medications.

Badass Scotsman
January 30th 06, 12:32 AM
"Dr.Carla,DVM" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s72...
> Definitely see a veterinary cardiologist who can schedule your cat for a
> echocardiogram (an ultrasound of the heart) and start him on medications.


Going to arrange this, I believe he may have already had the ultrasound last
time around.

I presume you are a vet? In your opinion, is Tango in real danger of dying
as a young cat? Maybe a better question is, can cats with this condition
survive with a full normal life / is long term, prognosis *ever* good? I am
clutching at straws, Tango is the perfect pet - follows us everywhere,
always wants to be involved - (he even helps wash the dishes - paws the tap
water)...He sleeps with us in the bed, watches TV with us, sits on the side
of the bath - he is completely and utterly inseparable from us, and at a
year old, we are devastated to be told he has a killer condition :(

I am hoping he is going to be the 1 in a million which survives, we really
don't want to loose him, and if we do, I don't think we could bring
ourselves to owning another cat - the heartache may be too much, he is like
a baby son to Claire.

Gary.

Badass Scotsman
February 1st 06, 11:23 AM
Hello everyone,

Excellent news. After taking this groups advice and arranging a visit with
our expert cat cardiologist, Tango has been given the 100% all clear, he had
over £600 worth of tests carried out - took 3 or 4 hours, everything is
healthy and normal.

The reason for him being diagnosed with Restrictive Heart Failure remains a
mystery, but we were told that a slight viral infection, nerviousness, and /
or some other circumstances could lead to an erroneus reading. We don't
blame our vet for making the diagnosis, and understand that these things
happen. We are absolutely thrilled to bits, and Tango is getting more love
than every!!!

Glad we are out the woods,

Regards,

Gary.

Toni
February 1st 06, 11:28 AM
"Badass Scotsman" > wrote in message
...
> Hello everyone,
>
> Excellent news. After taking this groups advice and arranging a visit
with
> our expert cat cardiologist, Tango has been given the 100% all clear, he
had
> over £600 worth of tests carried out - took 3 or 4 hours, everything is
> healthy and normal.


Very good news!



--
Toni
http://www.irish-wolfhounds.com

Spider
February 1st 06, 12:58 PM
Badass Scotsman > wrote in message
...
> Hello everyone,
>
> Excellent news. After taking this groups advice and arranging a visit
with
> our expert cat cardiologist, Tango has been given the 100% all clear, he
had
> over £600 worth of tests carried out - took 3 or 4 hours, everything is
> healthy and normal.
>
> The reason for him being diagnosed with Restrictive Heart Failure remains
a
> mystery, but we were told that a slight viral infection, nerviousness, and
/
> or some other circumstances could lead to an erroneus reading. We don't
> blame our vet for making the diagnosis, and understand that these things
> happen. We are absolutely thrilled to bits, and Tango is getting more
love
> than every!!!
>
> Glad we are out the woods,
>
> Regards,
>
> Gary.
>
Hi Gary and Claire,

I am SO relieved for you! I am sure that's the best £600 you've ever spent.
I love a happy ending .. and this is just purrfect.

Give Tango and Claire a hug from us.

Spider, Cheetah and Panther

Badass Scotsman
February 1st 06, 01:13 PM
> Hi Gary and Claire,
>
> I am SO relieved for you! I am sure that's the best £600 you've ever
> spent.
> I love a happy ending .. and this is just purrfect.
>
> Give Tango and Claire a hug from us.
>
> Spider, Cheetah and Panther


Thanks for the kind words. We have all three cats insured, so didnt have to
spend a penny. Regardless, I would have spent any amount required,
insurance or not.

Kind Regards,

Gary.

Ivor Jones
February 2nd 06, 02:14 PM
"Badass Scotsman" > wrote in
message
> Hello everyone,
>
> Excellent news. After taking this groups advice and
> arranging a visit with our expert cat cardiologist, Tango
> has been given the 100% all clear, he had over £600 worth
> of tests carried out - took 3 or 4 hours, everything is
> healthy and normal.
> The reason for him being diagnosed with Restrictive Heart
> Failure remains a mystery, but we were told that a slight
> viral infection, nerviousness, and / or some other
> circumstances could lead to an erroneus reading. We
> don't blame our vet for making the diagnosis, and
> understand that these things happen. We are absolutely
> thrilled to bits, and Tango is getting more love than
> every!!!
> Glad we are out the woods,
>
> Regards,
>
> Gary.

That's great news..! If the worst was ever to come to the worst, Gary,
there is still hope he may survive. I don't know if you saw it, but on
BBC1 a few weeks ago there was the story of Harry, a Maine Coon who had
open heart surgery at the Royal Veterinary College..! He is the first cat
ever to survive this kind of surgery, so there is hope for us all :-)

Ivor

Dr.Carla,DVM
February 5th 06, 03:39 AM
I apologize for not being able to answer you sooner.
Life dependency will depend on how advanced the disease is and how he
responds to medication. Some cats have lived for years. It is however
unlikely that the cat will live as long as a cat without a cardiomyopathy.
While the intial work up for your cat will can be expensive due to the
necessity for frequent checkups, the cardiac medications for cats are
relatively inexpensive -- my cat with HCM (hypertrophic cardiomyopathy)
takes atenolol and benazapril, which cost about $10 a month, retail.
I wish you the best outcome.

Dr.Carla,DVM
February 5th 06, 03:39 AM
Awesome!

"Badass Scotsman" > wrote in message
...
> Hello everyone,
>
> Excellent news. After taking this groups advice and arranging a visit
> with our expert cat cardiologist, Tango has been given the 100% all clear,
> he had over £600 worth of tests carried out - took 3 or 4 hours,
> everything is healthy and normal.
>
> The reason for him being diagnosed with Restrictive Heart Failure remains
> a mystery, but we were told that a slight viral infection, nerviousness,
> and / or some other circumstances could lead to an erroneus reading. We
> don't blame our vet for making the diagnosis, and understand that these
> things happen. We are absolutely thrilled to bits, and Tango is getting
> more love than every!!!
>
> Glad we are out the woods,
>
> Regards,
>
> Gary.
>