PDA

View Full Version : Cystitis


Rick
January 28th 06, 11:31 AM
HI ALL

My cat had cystitis which was treated by antibiotics, six months later she caught it again.

She now a couple of months down the road showing signs of it.

The last time she had it the vet said stress may bring it on and she was being hassled in the garden by another cat but that has now stopped.

My vet is abit reluctant to operate as my cat is at least 13 years old if not more.

My question is, is it fair to keep her on antibiotics ? surely as time goes by she will get used to them and they will not be effective.

I don't know...



--
---
THANKS
RICK

----------------------------
Why not look at our E Bay items
http://tinyurl.com/4874c
www.ricksvill.co.uk
MAKE MONEY FROM YOUR WEB SITE
www.chitika.com/mm_overview.php?refid=ricksvill

J. dvm
January 28th 06, 01:12 PM
"Rick" > wrote in message k...
HI ALL

My cat had cystitis which was treated by antibiotics, six months later she caught it again.

She now a couple of months down the road showing signs of it.

The last time she had it the vet said stress may bring it on and she was being hassled in the garden by another cat but that has now stopped.

My vet is abit reluctant to operate as my cat is at least 13 years old if not more.

My question is, is it fair to keep her on antibiotics ? surely as time goes by she will get used to them and they will not be effective.


Rick,

There are a number of causes of cystitis and if you identify the cause then the most appropriate treatment could be prescribed. Cystitis is cats is usually due to either bacterial infection, urinary crystals (multiple types), stones (multiple types) and idiopathic cystitis (aka interstitial cystitis). Far less commonly it can be due to bladder cancer. We do not yet fully understand the cause of idiopathic cystitis (hence the term idiopathic) but it is very common and there are various treatment approaches. IC can be diagnosed by biopsy or by ruling out the other causes. Thus your cat should have a urinalysis to examine chemical changes and to look for crystals; xrays to look for stones; and urine culture and sensitivity to see if bacterial infection is present and if so to choose an appropriate antibiotic. (Other tests could be considered later including ultrasound and contrast xrays to look for tumours or underlying causes of infection.) If the three tests I described are done simultaneously you will get a diagnosis most of the time. For example if urinalysis and xrays are normal and no bacteria is cultured then your cat most likely has idiopathic cystitis. Be aware that the majority of cases of cystitis in cats are not associated with bacterial infection and only a culture and sensitivity will identify a bacterial infection.

J. dvm

Rick
January 28th 06, 01:36 PM
"J. dvm" > wrote in message . ..

"Rick" > wrote in message k...
HI ALL

My cat had cystitis which was treated by antibiotics, six months later she caught it again.

She now a couple of months down the road showing signs of it.

The last time she had it the vet said stress may bring it on and she was being hassled in the garden by another cat but that has now stopped.

My vet is abit reluctant to operate as my cat is at least 13 years old if not more.

My question is, is it fair to keep her on antibiotics ? surely as time goes by she will get used to them and they will not be effective.


Rick,

There are a number of causes of cystitis and if you identify the cause then the most appropriate treatment could be prescribed. Cystitis is cats is usually due to either bacterial infection, urinary crystals (multiple types), stones (multiple types) and idiopathic cystitis (aka interstitial cystitis). Far less commonly it can be due to bladder cancer. We do not yet fully understand the cause of idiopathic cystitis (hence the term idiopathic) but it is very common and there are various treatment approaches. IC can be diagnosed by biopsy or by ruling out the other causes. Thus your cat should have a urinalysis to examine chemical changes and to look for crystals; xrays to look for stones; and urine culture and sensitivity to see if bacterial infection is present and if so to choose an appropriate antibiotic. (Other tests could be considered later including ultrasound and contrast xrays to look for tumours or underlying causes of infection.) If the three tests I described are done simultaneously you will get a diagnosis most of the time. For example if urinalysis and xrays are normal and no bacteria is cultured then your cat most likely has idiopathic cystitis. Be aware that the majority of cases of cystitis in cats are not associated with bacterial infection and only a culture and sensitivity will identify a bacterial infection.

J. dvm

I think I'll take her to the vets Monday and ask for a blood and water test to be done.

Thanks for your help.

RICK