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Jeanna
January 31st 06, 06:21 PM
Hi everyone. I have a Mancoon who’s coming up on his 15th birthday at the end
of March. He has been diabetic since he was 12 and soon after he was
diagnosed, he moved to California with me from Arizona after my dad passed
away… It was an adjustment to say the least, since I had another, very moody
female kitty living with me at the time. Snooker started peeing on the floor
soon after he moved in with me, and I assumed it was because he was missing
his Grandpa and not happy about the living situation.

About 6 months later I moved back in with my Mother, and left the moody
female behind, but my Mom already had 2 other cats as well. Snooker seemed to
adjust just fine. He had met the other kitties before, and all 3 boys got
along great. He used the litter box without any problems. Occasionally,
however, my Mom’s older cat would pee on the carpet or even on my cloths, and
I figured it was a territorial thing and that he was just ****ed that I moved
back home and with another cat.

Well, now we have moved once again to a new, bigger home in Las Vegas. All 3
were doing great at first. Now, recently, especially over the past 2 weeks,
Snooker has stopped using the litter box again all together. What seemed to
be an occasional pee on the floor has become something he does every single
time. A couple of times I have seen him spray, but usually its just him
peeing. He does it in one room, but in more than one spot. He seems to be
pooping outside the box too. Its hard to say, though since I've never caught
him in the pooping act, but I assume its him... Other than this, he seems
fine. His behavior is normal. He’s playful, he knows when its treat time
(when he gets his insulin shot), he still jumps fine, etc.

Is this just “normal” kitty mood swings or should I worry that he may be
having some kidney problems?

--
~Jeanna
(Snooker's Mama)

HERE KITTY, KITTY, KITTY!
LET ME HUG YOU!

---MIKE---
January 31st 06, 07:36 PM
How many litter boxes do you have? For three cats you should have AT
LEAST three (four would be even better). They should be in different
locations.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44° 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Jeanna
January 31st 06, 07:59 PM
---MIKE--- wrote:
How many litter boxes do you have? For three cats you should have AT LEAST
three (four would be even better). They should be in different locations.

---MIKE---
In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
(44° 15' N - Elevation 1580')

____________________________________

We had 3, now 2 and in different rooms...

I'm taking him to the doctor today... I just PRAY that its nothing but
emotional... THAT I can handle...
I'll get 10 boxes if I have to!!!

--
~Jeanna
(Snooker's Mama)

HERE KITTY, KITTY, KITTY!
LET ME HUG YOU!

Phil P.
February 1st 06, 01:41 PM
"Jeanna" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> ---MIKE--- wrote:
> How many litter boxes do you have? For three cats you should have AT
LEAST
> three (four would be even better). They should be in different locations.
>
> ---MIKE---
> In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
> (44° 15' N - Elevation 1580')
>
> ____________________________________
>
> We had 3, now 2 and in different rooms...
>
> I'm taking him to the doctor today... I just PRAY that its nothing but
> emotional... THAT I can handle...
> I'll get 10 boxes if I have to!!!

Jeanna,

Ask your vet to analyze his urine for urinary tract infection. His urination
problem may be the result of a UTI. . Diabetic cats often have glycosuria-
sugar in the urine is an excellent breeding ground for bacteria which can
easily ascend to the bladder and cause an infection- and if not treated, can
ascend to the kidneys and cause a serious kidney infection called
pyelonephritis which can lead to kidney damage. Glycosuria can also create
an osmotic diuresis which can cause excessive urination. If he's
experiencing painful urination, he may be using the litterbox because he's
associating the pain with the litterbox.

Also, speak to your vet about Hill's Prescription Diet m/d. I've weaned
several cats off insulin completely and significantly reduced the insulin
dose in others by feeding them low carbohydrate diets. M/d is very low in
carbohydrates and fairly low in phosphorus (a concern with older cats).
I've also had great results in diabetic cats with Fancy Feast Seafood Filets
Tuna & Oceanfish Feast in Aspic. Its even lower in carbohydrates and
phosphorus (and cheaper) than m/d.

Many IDDM (insulin-dependent) and difficult-to regulate diabetic cats are
now being successfully and easily managed with only dietary management.
Even with documented clinical studies, many vets are still slow to change to
new therapies, so you may need to seek a second opinion if your vet is
resistant to change.

How's your cat's weight? Obesity causes a reversible insulin resistance that
often resolves when the cat comes down to his ideal or close to his ideal
body weight. This will also probably resolve his glycosuria and
significantly reduce his risk of UTIs.


Best of luck,

Phil