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Perry Justus
February 1st 06, 11:16 PM
Hi,

I have a twelve and a half year old cat who seems to be losing weight
despite the fact that she has a big appetite, plays a lot, and
generally seems healthy. She's been somewhat overweight (not obese)
since she had her second litter of kittens in 1994 but as of late she
feels like she's dropped a number of pounds and has, if you'll excuse
my crassness, very saggy titties. She seems particularly boney around
her shoulders, but I can't really feel her spine and her ribs without
applying some pressure. What's the deal? Is it just mid-age? If
she's sick with something, she doesn't show it, because she seems a
lot more active than some of my other cats. Also, her coat is
healthier than it's been in years, for some odd reason.

Thanks,
Perry

cybercat
February 1st 06, 11:36 PM
"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
> Hi,
>
> I have a twelve and a half year old cat who seems to be losing weight
> despite the fact that she has a big appetite, plays a lot, and
> generally seems healthy. She's been somewhat overweight (not obese)
> since she had her second litter of kittens in 1994 but as of late she
> feels like she's dropped a number of pounds and has, if you'll excuse
> my crassness, very saggy titties. She seems particularly boney around
> her shoulders, but I can't really feel her spine and her ribs without
> applying some pressure. What's the deal? Is it just mid-age? If
> she's sick with something, she doesn't show it, because she seems a
> lot more active than some of my other cats. Also, her coat is
> healthier than it's been in years, for some odd reason.
>

How do you know she is healthy? Has a vet checked her? She is
about ten years old, judging from your saying that she had a second
litter of kittens in 1994. She could have any number of health problems.

Perry Justus
February 1st 06, 11:57 PM
On 2 Feb 2006 00:36:57 +0100, "cybercat" > wrote:

>
>"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
>> Hi,
>>
>> I have a twelve and a half year old cat who seems to be losing weight
>> despite the fact that she has a big appetite, plays a lot, and
>> generally seems healthy. She's been somewhat overweight (not obese)
>> since she had her second litter of kittens in 1994 but as of late she
>> feels like she's dropped a number of pounds and has, if you'll excuse
>> my crassness, very saggy titties. She seems particularly boney around
>> her shoulders, but I can't really feel her spine and her ribs without
>> applying some pressure. What's the deal? Is it just mid-age? If
>> she's sick with something, she doesn't show it, because she seems a
>> lot more active than some of my other cats. Also, her coat is
>> healthier than it's been in years, for some odd reason.
>>
>
>How do you know she is healthy? Has a vet checked her? She is
>about ten years old, judging from your saying that she had a second
>litter of kittens in 1994. She could have any number of health problems.
>

I already said that she's twelve and a half. (Reread my original
post!) If she's eating, and active, and seems normal, what could be
the problem?

Perry

Corey Kaye
February 2nd 06, 12:20 AM
Perry Justus wrote:

> I already said that she's twelve and a half. (Reread my original
> post!) If she's eating, and active, and seems normal, what could be
> the problem?

Just off the top of my non-expert head: hyperthyroidism, cancer, heart
disease, lung disease, infection, worms...

Take the cat to the vet :)

Corey

cybercat
February 2nd 06, 12:21 AM
"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
> On 2 Feb 2006 00:36:57 +0100, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
> >
> >"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> Hi,
> >>
> >> I have a twelve and a half year old cat who seems to be losing weight
> >> despite the fact that she has a big appetite, plays a lot, and
> >> generally seems healthy. She's been somewhat overweight (not obese)
> >> since she had her second litter of kittens in 1994 but as of late she
> >> feels like she's dropped a number of pounds and has, if you'll excuse
> >> my crassness, very saggy titties. She seems particularly boney around
> >> her shoulders, but I can't really feel her spine and her ribs without
> >> applying some pressure. What's the deal? Is it just mid-age? If
> >> she's sick with something, she doesn't show it, because she seems a
> >> lot more active than some of my other cats. Also, her coat is
> >> healthier than it's been in years, for some odd reason.
> >>
> >
> >How do you know she is healthy? Has a vet checked her? She is
> >about ten years old, judging from your saying that she had a second
> >litter of kittens in 1994. She could have any number of health problems.
> >
>
> I already said that she's twelve and a half. (Reread my original
> post!)

I missed that. Sorry.

If she's eating, and active, and seems normal, what could be
> the problem?
>

That is what they have vets for. Take her in.

Gail
February 2nd 06, 12:22 AM
She needs to see a vet. Weight loss is a symptom of a health problem (ie.
chronic renal failure, hyperactive thyroid, etc). Please don't delay since
these conditions are treatable.
Gail
"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
> Hi,
>
> I have a twelve and a half year old cat who seems to be losing weight
> despite the fact that she has a big appetite, plays a lot, and
> generally seems healthy. She's been somewhat overweight (not obese)
> since she had her second litter of kittens in 1994 but as of late she
> feels like she's dropped a number of pounds and has, if you'll excuse
> my crassness, very saggy titties. She seems particularly boney around
> her shoulders, but I can't really feel her spine and her ribs without
> applying some pressure. What's the deal? Is it just mid-age? If
> she's sick with something, she doesn't show it, because she seems a
> lot more active than some of my other cats. Also, her coat is
> healthier than it's been in years, for some odd reason.
>
> Thanks,
> Perry

Perry Justus
February 2nd 06, 12:33 AM
On Wed, 1 Feb 2006 17:20:59 -0700, "Corey Kaye"
> wrote:

>Perry Justus wrote:
>
>> I already said that she's twelve and a half. (Reread my original
>> post!) If she's eating, and active, and seems normal, what could be
>> the problem?
>
>Just off the top of my non-expert head: hyperthyroidism, cancer, heart
>disease, lung disease, infection, worms...
>
>Take the cat to the vet :)
>
>Corey
>

Jeeze... I should've known better than to even ask without going
through the usenet archives first. She'll be going to the vet ASAP,
but we're basically poor and still paying out money for visits that
happened last year (plus, the vet office has had a notice up on the
wall that they won't allow anyone to pay later anymore, so we're
pushing it -- I think our vet was the only one in town who would even
let people do it in the first place).

Perry

Corey Kaye
February 2nd 06, 12:40 AM
Perry Justus wrote:

> Jeeze... I should've known better than to even ask without going
> through the usenet archives first. She'll be going to the vet ASAP,
> but we're basically poor and still paying out money for visits that
> happened last year (plus, the vet office has had a notice up on the
> wall that they won't allow anyone to pay later anymore, so we're
> pushing it -- I think our vet was the only one in town who would even
> let people do it in the first place).

Well, Perry, you got answers. It could be a lot of different things.
Several of them aren't serious or expensive, and several of them could be
life threatening. What's an exam fee run at your clinic? At mine, it's
around $30. For $30, your vet should be able to give you an idea if you're
in for a lot more $$$, or just a bit.

Corey

cybercat
February 2nd 06, 12:40 AM
"Perry Justus" > wrote
> Jeeze... I should've known better than to even ask without going through
the usenet archives first.

Sorry for frustrating you. Weight loss when a cat is eating as usual is just
such a typical sign of illness, some serious, some not so. I am also sorry
about your financial situation, I have been there. She does need to see a
vet, though. There is just no way around it.

Perry Justus
February 2nd 06, 12:58 AM
On 2 Feb 2006 01:40:51 +0100, "cybercat" > wrote:

>
>"Perry Justus" > wrote
>> Jeeze... I should've known better than to even ask without going through
>the usenet archives first.
>
>Sorry for frustrating you. Weight loss when a cat is eating as usual is just
>such a typical sign of illness, some serious, some not so. I am also sorry
>about your financial situation, I have been there. She does need to see a
>vet, though. There is just no way around it.
>

It's okay. It just really is frustrating, especially when one has as
many cats as I have and not enough cash. Luckily, most of them have
been extremely healthy (*knocks on wood*), so they've rarely had to
see the vet, but most of them are nearing the 10 year mark or older,
so I can just imagine all the problems that will start popping up...

Perry

Gail
February 2nd 06, 01:15 AM
Yes, you're right, Perry. After 10 years, a cat is geriatric and more
vulnerable to many diseases.
Gail
"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
> On 2 Feb 2006 01:40:51 +0100, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
>>
>>"Perry Justus" > wrote
>>> Jeeze... I should've known better than to even ask without going through
>>the usenet archives first.
>>
>>Sorry for frustrating you. Weight loss when a cat is eating as usual is
>>just
>>such a typical sign of illness, some serious, some not so. I am also sorry
>>about your financial situation, I have been there. She does need to see a
>>vet, though. There is just no way around it.
>>
>
> It's okay. It just really is frustrating, especially when one has as
> many cats as I have and not enough cash. Luckily, most of them have
> been extremely healthy (*knocks on wood*), so they've rarely had to
> see the vet, but most of them are nearing the 10 year mark or older,
> so I can just imagine all the problems that will start popping up...
>
> Perry

Perry Justus
February 2nd 06, 01:48 AM
On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 01:15:58 GMT, "Gail" > wrote:

>Yes, you're right, Perry. After 10 years, a cat is geriatric and more
>vulnerable to many diseases.
>Gail

10 years?! Are you sure? Cats can live to be 25-30 sometimes.

Perry

Perry Justus
February 2nd 06, 01:51 AM
On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 17:16:43 -0600, Perry Justus
> wrote:
<snip>

I forgot to mention this, but could it be possible that she's lost
weight because she's eating better food? She was overweight from the
time she was two until just a few months ago, and last year we started
feeding her better food because our youngest cat couldn't tolerate any
other type of food. She went from eating Meow Mix, etc. to Royal
Canin on a regular basis last year.

Perry

NMR
February 2nd 06, 01:51 AM
"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 01:15:58 GMT, "Gail" > wrote:
>
>>Yes, you're right, Perry. After 10 years, a cat is geriatric and more
>>vulnerable to many diseases.
>>Gail
>
> 10 years?! Are you sure? Cats can live to be 25-30 sometimes.
>
> Perry

My cat precious just lived to almost 20 years we have had other cat go
past 20

Gail
February 2nd 06, 04:08 AM
An average age for an indoor only cat is about 15 or 16. Cats can live
longer, but most do not.
Gail
"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 01:15:58 GMT, "Gail" > wrote:
>
>>Yes, you're right, Perry. After 10 years, a cat is geriatric and more
>>vulnerable to many diseases.
>>Gail
>
> 10 years?! Are you sure? Cats can live to be 25-30 sometimes.
>
> Perry

February 2nd 06, 01:22 PM
Perry

Please take her to the vet. My last kitty was 20 years and 3 months
when we had to put him to sleep. He started loosing weight when he was
about 18 - hyperthyroid. Simple blood test. Meds to alter it. I
think they say cats are geriatric at 8-10 years.

The type of food would not cause the weight loss.

Bobblespin
February 2nd 06, 02:04 PM
Perry Justus > wrote in

> Hi,
>
> I have a twelve and a half year old cat who seems to be losing weight
> despite the fact that she has a big appetite, plays a lot, and
> generally seems healthy. She's been somewhat overweight (not obese)
> since she had her second litter of kittens in 1994 but as of late she
> feels like she's dropped a number of pounds and has, if you'll excuse
> my crassness, very saggy titties. She seems particularly boney around
> her shoulders, but I can't really feel her spine and her ribs without
> applying some pressure. What's the deal? Is it just mid-age? If
> she's sick with something, she doesn't show it, because she seems a
> lot more active than some of my other cats. Also, her coat is
> healthier than it's been in years, for some odd reason.
>
> Thanks,
> Perry

Sounds identical to what we went through with our cat Tuffy when he was
about 16. I turned out his kidneys were starting to go, but he lived
happily for another year after diagnosis.

MaryL
February 2nd 06, 02:28 PM
"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 1 Feb 2006 17:20:59 -0700, "Corey Kaye"
> > wrote:
>
>>Perry Justus wrote:
>>
>>> I already said that she's twelve and a half. (Reread my original
>>> post!) If she's eating, and active, and seems normal, what could be
>>> the problem?
>>
>>Just off the top of my non-expert head: hyperthyroidism, cancer, heart
>>disease, lung disease, infection, worms...
>>
>>Take the cat to the vet :)
>>
>>Corey
>>
>
> Jeeze... I should've known better than to even ask without going
> through the usenet archives first. She'll be going to the vet ASAP,
> but we're basically poor and still paying out money for visits that
> happened last year (plus, the vet office has had a notice up on the
> wall that they won't allow anyone to pay later anymore, so we're
> pushing it -- I think our vet was the only one in town who would even
> let people do it in the first place).
>
> Perry

People are not trying to be insulting to you. The problem is, no one can
diagnose anything from a distance; and *every* cat should be seen annually.
Just as I see a doctor regularly, I also take my cats in for routine exams.
It will be much less expensive for you -- and more "treatable" for the
cat -- if you catch potential problems early and not wait until progression
to a major problem.

Yes, I did read your statement that you are strapped for funds, and I am not
making light of it. However, a cat that "seems normal" could still have
medical issues -- and the fact that you said she has lost several pounds
could be an important symptom. "Several pounds" on a cat is a *very big*
change. For example, you say that she has always been somewhat overweight.
So, if she weighs 15 pounds and has lost 3 for unexplained reasons, that
means a loss of 20 percent of her body weight. Now, think about what that
would translate into if the same thing were to happen to you. Surely you
would want to check with a physician even if you felt fine. (And, it is
also important to recognize that your cat may not feel as well as you
presume. Cats are well-known to hide pain and discomfort as long as
possible.)

MaryL

PawsForThought
February 2nd 06, 04:15 PM
Perry Justus wrote:
I already said that she's twelve and a half. (Reread my original
> post!) If she's eating, and active, and seems normal, what could be
> the problem?

I would highly recommend she get a complete physical exam and full
blood panel done. There is no way otherwise to really tell what is
wrong with her. At this point, you'd just be guessing. The good news
is that if you catch it early, whatever might be wrong can most likely
be treated.

LAUREN

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe

Barb
February 2nd 06, 05:06 PM
Are you writing to a cat news group for a diagnosis? Am I even spelling
that word correctly? Please, take your cat to a vet.

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.

Perry Justus
February 2nd 06, 09:13 PM
On Thu, 2 Feb 2006 08:28:53 -0600, "MaryL"
-OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote:

>
>"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
>> On Wed, 1 Feb 2006 17:20:59 -0700, "Corey Kaye"
>> > wrote:
>>
>>>Perry Justus wrote:
>>>
>>>> I already said that she's twelve and a half. (Reread my original
>>>> post!) If she's eating, and active, and seems normal, what could be
>>>> the problem?
>>>
>>>Just off the top of my non-expert head: hyperthyroidism, cancer, heart
>>>disease, lung disease, infection, worms...
>>>
>>>Take the cat to the vet :)
>>>
>>>Corey
>>>
>>
>> Jeeze... I should've known better than to even ask without going
>> through the usenet archives first. She'll be going to the vet ASAP,
>> but we're basically poor and still paying out money for visits that
>> happened last year (plus, the vet office has had a notice up on the
>> wall that they won't allow anyone to pay later anymore, so we're
>> pushing it -- I think our vet was the only one in town who would even
>> let people do it in the first place).
>>
>> Perry
>
>People are not trying to be insulting to you.

Where did I imply that? I was just amazed at all the potential
problems.

>Yes, I did read your statement that you are strapped for funds, and I am not
>making light of it. However, a cat that "seems normal" could still have
>medical issues -- and the fact that you said she has lost several pounds
>could be an important symptom. "Several pounds" on a cat is a *very big*
>change.

Well, she hasn't been weighed; she just feels lighter. She's going in
for a checkup next week, but I'm hoping that she's just lost some
weight because she's on a better food.

Perry

MaryL
February 2nd 06, 09:32 PM
"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 2 Feb 2006 08:28:53 -0600, "MaryL"
> -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote:
<snip>
>>
>>People are not trying to be insulting to you.
>
> Where did I imply that? I was just amazed at all the potential
> problems.
>

Sorry, I apparently misinterpreted, and I wanted to reassure you that people
were trying to give advice and not hurl insults. This is the statement that
led me to believe you were taking some of the messages in a different
context: "Jeeze... I should've known better than to even ask without going
through the usenet archives first."
>>Yes, I did read your statement that you are strapped for funds, and I am
>>not
>>making light of it. However, a cat that "seems normal" could still have
>>medical issues -- and the fact that you said she has lost several pounds
>>could be an important symptom. "Several pounds" on a cat is a *very big*
>>change.
>
> Well, she hasn't been weighed; she just feels lighter. She's going in
> for a checkup next week, but I'm hoping that she's just lost some
> weight because she's on a better food.
>
You said in your original message that she feels like she has dropped a
number of pounds. If she hasn't been weighed, it is important to do so as
soon as possible. I'm glad to hear that you already have a trip to the vet
planned.

MaryL

> Perry
>

Spot
February 3rd 06, 03:29 AM
You know post like this really irritate me the **** out of me. Obviously if
the cat is loosing weight then she needs seen by a vet.

Don't be like my idiot co-worker who for 2 months kept saying oh he's just
not eating as much. I told her repeatedly to take the cat to the vets when
they don't eat or loose weight something is seriously wrong. She always had
some damned excuse like --- I have to pay for Williams gymnastic classes
this month. I'm sorry but her damned spoiled brat kit could have done
without the classes. Instead she spent the money on her ungratefull little
******* of a kid and the cat died from phenumonia.

My money might be tight to at times but when they are sick you find a way.
You don't make them wait and look to a newsgroup for answers that only your
vet can give you. If I hurt your feelings too bad get over it and take the
cat to the vets like you should.

If you are short on funds then it's time you start setting aside money for
stuff like this. I have 5 animals and I put money away every month so when
the time comes in an emergency I have the money. If it's an extreme
emergency I have a line of credit that I use but I make sure they are taken
care of.

Celeste


"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 1 Feb 2006 17:20:59 -0700, "Corey Kaye"
> > wrote:
>
>>Perry Justus wrote:
>>
>>> I already said that she's twelve and a half. (Reread my original
>>> post!) If she's eating, and active, and seems normal, what could be
>>> the problem?
>>
>>Just off the top of my non-expert head: hyperthyroidism, cancer, heart
>>disease, lung disease, infection, worms...
>>
>>Take the cat to the vet :)
>>
>>Corey
>>
>
> Jeeze... I should've known better than to even ask without going
> through the usenet archives first. She'll be going to the vet ASAP,
> but we're basically poor and still paying out money for visits that
> happened last year (plus, the vet office has had a notice up on the
> wall that they won't allow anyone to pay later anymore, so we're
> pushing it -- I think our vet was the only one in town who would even
> let people do it in the first place).
>
> Perry

Perry Justus
February 3rd 06, 06:13 AM
On Fri, 03 Feb 2006 03:29:39 GMT, "Spot" >
wrote:

>You know post like this really irritate me the **** out of me. Obviously if
>the cat is loosing weight then she needs seen by a vet.

Read my other posts. I think it's funny that no one has even
commented on the fact that she was overweight. She's not anorexic,
but she has gotten skinnier. As I wrote in TWO other posts, we
started giving her better quality food a little while back; why has no
one replied with their thoughts on her food switch and my speculation
about whether or not that's had an effect on her weight? She may have
something wrong, which is why she's **going in next week**, but it's
not an emergency. (Trust me, if it becomes readily apparent that one
of my cats has something wrong, like a UT or respiratory infection,
they go THAT DAY or as soon as possible.)

Perry

February 3rd 06, 06:41 AM
Perry Justus wrote:
> On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 17:16:43 -0600, Perry Justus
> > wrote:
> <snip>
>
> I forgot to mention this, but could it be possible that she's lost
> weight because she's eating better food? She was overweight from the
> time she was two until just a few months ago, and last year we started
> feeding her better food because our youngest cat couldn't tolerate any
> other type of food. She went from eating Meow Mix, etc. to Royal
> Canin on a regular basis last year.
>
> Perry

Yes. She is getting more protein per ounce, no doubt, and less carbs.
That will foster weight loss, if fed the same amount. I suspect she is
eating less of it too, eh?

-L.

Perry Justus
February 3rd 06, 07:30 AM
On 2 Feb 2006 22:41:16 -0800, wrote:

>
>Perry Justus wrote:
>> On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 17:16:43 -0600, Perry Justus
>> > wrote:
>> <snip>
>>
>> I forgot to mention this, but could it be possible that she's lost
>> weight because she's eating better food? She was overweight from the
>> time she was two until just a few months ago, and last year we started
>> feeding her better food because our youngest cat couldn't tolerate any
>> other type of food. She went from eating Meow Mix, etc. to Royal
>> Canin on a regular basis last year.
>>
>> Perry
>
>Yes. She is getting more protein per ounce, no doubt, and less carbs.
>That will foster weight loss, if fed the same amount. I suspect she is
>eating less of it too, eh?
>
>-L.

Hard to say. She's always been a big of a piglet when it comes to wet
food (she'll try to intimidate whoever else is eating if it's one of
my less outgoing cats, or just eat the rest if they didn't eat it
all), but I must say I've never kept a watch on how often she eats the
dry food, which is freely available. I just hope that there's nothing
seriously wrong with her. :|

Perry

Ryan Robbins
February 3rd 06, 12:36 PM
"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...

> I already said that she's twelve and a half. (Reread my original
> post!) If she's eating, and active, and seems normal, what could be
> the problem?

Hyper-thyroidism. Onset of renal failure. A whole bunch of things. Cats are
masters of deception when it comes to hiding symptoms of illness.

Ryan Robbins
February 3rd 06, 12:38 PM
"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 01:15:58 GMT, "Gail" > wrote:
>
>>Yes, you're right, Perry. After 10 years, a cat is geriatric and more
>>vulnerable to many diseases.
>>Gail
>
> 10 years?! Are you sure? Cats can live to be 25-30 sometimes.

It is very rare for cats to live past 20.

NMR
February 3rd 06, 05:36 PM
"Ryan Robbins" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Perry Justus" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 01:15:58 GMT, "Gail" > wrote:
>>
>>>Yes, you're right, Perry. After 10 years, a cat is geriatric and more
>>>vulnerable to many diseases.
>>>Gail
>>
>> 10 years?! Are you sure? Cats can live to be 25-30 sometimes.
>
> It is very rare for cats to live past 20.
far from the truth unless they are a outside cat

Alison
February 4th 06, 01:06 AM
"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
> Hi,
>
> I have a twelve and a half year old cat who seems to be
losing weight
> despite the fact that she has a big appetite, plays a lot,
and
> generally seems healthy. She's been somewhat overweight
(not obese)
> since she had her second litter of kittens in 1994 but as
of late she
> feels like she's dropped a number of pounds and has, if
you'll excuse
> my crassness, very saggy titties. She seems particularly
boney around
> her shoulders, but I can't really feel her spine and her
ribs without
> applying some pressure. What's the deal? Is it just
mid-age? If
> she's sick with something, she doesn't show it, because
she seems a
> lot more active than some of my other cats. Also, her
coat is
> healthier than it's been in years, for some odd reason.
>
> Thanks,
> Perry>>
Apart from the reasons already mentioned , it could be her
teeth.
Alison

February 4th 06, 04:55 AM
Perry Justus wrote:
> Hi,
>
> I have a twelve and a half year old cat who seems to be losing weight
> despite the fact that she has a big appetite, plays a lot, and
> generally seems healthy. She's been somewhat overweight (not obese)
> since she had her second litter of kittens in 1994 but as of late she
> feels like she's dropped a number of pounds and has, if you'll excuse
> my crassness, very saggy titties. She seems particularly boney around
> her shoulders, but I can't really feel her spine and her ribs without
> applying some pressure. What's the deal? Is it just mid-age? If
> she's sick with something, she doesn't show it, because she seems a
> lot more active than some of my other cats. Also, her coat is
> healthier than it's been in years, for some odd reason.
>
> Thanks,
> Perry

With an apparently healthy 12.5 yr. old cat losing wieght, my first
guess would be hyperthyroidism. Very common in older cats, & classic
symptom is weight loss, despite eating well. Plus you say she's very
active. (The entire body - all of its organs/systems - over-revs when
hyperthyroid, whether human or feline.)

But it could be virtually anything. Besides a physical exam, a full
blood panel would very likely pop up the probable suspect. IOW, vet
time.

In the event that it actually did turn out to be hyper-T, that's
actually a fairly good diagnosis IMO, in that it's relatively easy to
control, once the med is regulated.

Cathy