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Rhonda
February 2nd 06, 06:03 AM
At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
though, it might be time for senior blood tests.

Rhonda

Perry Justus
February 2nd 06, 06:08 AM
On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 06:03:49 GMT, Rhonda >
wrote:

>At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
>that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
>though, it might be time for senior blood tests.
>
>Rhonda

Some of my cats who are nearly 10-11 are far more active and curious
than the others who are half that age.

Perry

cybercat
February 2nd 06, 06:15 AM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
> that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
> though, it might be time for senior blood tests.
>

I think ten is a fair age to consider a cat "geriatric."

I was in denial of any such thing with my first cat, though.

We just don't like to think they are getting old.

-L.
February 2nd 06, 06:34 AM
Rhonda wrote:
> At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
> that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
> though, it might be time for senior blood tests.
>
> Rhonda

Depends on the clinic. At the feline specialty vet where I worked, we
didn't reccomend geriatric panel until age 12, unless the guardian
requested it. Many cats live past 15 - quite a few 20 or more.

-L.

February 2nd 06, 07:24 AM
cybercat wrote:
> "Rhonda" > wrote in message
> ...
> > At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
> > that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
> > though, it might be time for senior blood tests.
> >
>
> I think ten is a fair age to consider a cat "geriatric."
>
> I was in denial of any such thing with my first cat, though.
>
> We just don't like to think they are getting old.

I have to agree. I certainly haven't considered any of my 10 year old
cats to be geriatric, but after Maynard developed symptoms so suddenly
for liver failure, I have to review my thoughts of that. I may still
think of them as healthy and young, but I think I would feel better
getting the tests done.

With Maynard, I did have bloodwork done the year before, and things
were fine, but at age 18, I should have been doing it more often. At
least twice a year. His lliver values were so off the chart that the
bloodwork probably would have given us clues much sooner, and we could
have extended his life. As it was, he didn't lose his appetite and act
sick until after I took him to the vet. I was actually planning his
19th birthday party the night before since I was going to be at a cat
show as a vendor on his birthday in two weeks. I figured I would put up
a collage of photos and have a cake. I had no clue that he was even
sick. He seemed so normal. Then I saw his yellow ears. I figured he was
down to his last few months, and I would need to give him medication. I
did not realize until the vet looked at him that I was down to my last
3 days with him.

Kira is 11 and seems healthy enough, but I am going to do the senior
panel at the next checkup. I don't expect to find anything, but I will
feel better knowing that I am checking, and hopefully when something
does come up, there will be time to treat it.

Lesley
February 2nd 06, 12:49 PM
Rhonda wrote:

> At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
> that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
> though, it might be time for senior blood tests.
>
According to a box of dried food I read once 8 is senior. I looked down
at Isis and said "You're an old lady now" but she was too busy chasing
her tail to notice....Since she lived to be over 16 from what it said
on that box, she spent over half her life as a senior but she was still
playful until a few days before she died

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

Mr Tibbs
February 2nd 06, 01:03 PM
Rhonda wrote:
> At what age would you call a cat a senior cat?
> Rhonda

I know what you mean, I am crazy about my kitten...
(she's getting bigger, she's getting longer and lunkier)
and meaner too! but sweeter to offset the meaness

as for me personally, Im not going to "die"

im just going to nasty away

February 2nd 06, 01:33 PM
Lesley wrote:
> Rhonda wrote:
>
> > At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
> > that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
> > though, it might be time for senior blood tests.
> >
> According to a box of dried food I read once 8 is senior. I looked down
> at Isis and said "You're an old lady now" but she was too busy chasing
> her tail to notice....Since she lived to be over 16 from what it said
> on that box, she spent over half her life as a senior but she was still
> playful until a few days before she died
>

I actually tried Royal Canin food (more expensive than I was used to
paying) because the package said a senior was 15+. Finally, a cat food
maker that knows what a senior cat is. And they add glucosamine to the
food and actually do something for a senior.

I got a couple sample packets from the representitive at the cat show.
Tried it with Maynard who was 18. He perked up. I knew he had
arthtritis, and had been giving him glucoasmine which helped, but he
got tired of the fish flavored tablets and wouldn't eat them every day.
With the new kibble, I could see him walking faster, sometimes
trotting, and taking the stairs better. The sample ran out, and he
slowed down. I bought a bag of the food and he was better again. I was
really impressed.

They have changed the senior food to two types of "mature" - active and
indoor. Basically for more active older cats and less active older
cats. Both have glucosamine. Kira is only 11, but I decided to put her
on the active mature. Rather than wait for her to be obvious in slowing
down, I'd like to know that she is getting the extras for seniors.

CatNipped
February 2nd 06, 02:50 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old that
> I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking though, it
> might be time for senior blood tests.
>
> Rhonda

Well, I have a 16-year-old who claims she's still a spring chicken! ;>

Seriously, I don't think there's a magic number, I think it depends on the
individual cat. But 10 years old would be a good time for a senior
chick-up.

--

Hugs,

CatNipped

See all my masters at: http://www.PossiblePlaces.com/CatNipped/

cybercat
February 2nd 06, 03:14 PM
"CatNipped" > wrote in message
...
> "Rhonda" > wrote in message
> ...
> > At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
that
> > I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking though, it
> > might be time for senior blood tests.
> >
> > Rhonda
>
> Well, I have a 16-year-old who claims she's still a spring chicken! ;>
>
> Seriously, I don't think there's a magic number, I think it depends on the
> individual cat. But 10 years old would be a good time for a senior
> chick-up.
>

I agree. But I remember being in deep denial that my first cat was getting
old.
She was 18 years old and I felt a little twinge of resentment when we walked
in to a new vet's office and he said, "Oh, my, we have a senior citizen
here!"
To me she looked the same as ever, because I looked at her every day.
But now, looking at pictures, I can see that she really had changed over
time.
We just don't want them to get old because we know what happens after that.

PawsForThought
February 2nd 06, 04:12 PM
-L. wrote:
Depends on the clinic. At the feline specialty vet where I worked, we
> didn't reccomend geriatric panel until age 12, unless the guardian
> requested it. Many cats live past 15 - quite a few 20 or more.

My last cat lived to be 17. She didn't have any significant health
problems until about the last 6 months of her life, when she developed
chronic kidney failure.

LAUREN

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe

cybercat
February 3rd 06, 01:44 AM
"Diane" > wrote in message
link.net...
> In article >, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
> > She was 18 years old and I felt a little twinge of resentment when we
walked
> > in to a new vet's office and he said, "Oh, my, we have a senior citizen
> > here!"
>
> Did you think he meant you? :)
>

:) No.

I was offended on behalf of my kitty.

cybercat
February 3rd 06, 02:01 AM
"Diane" > wrote in message
link.net...
> In article >, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
> > "Diane" > wrote in message
> > link.net...
> > > In article >, "cybercat" >
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > > > She was 18 years old and I felt a little twinge of resentment when
we
> > walked
> > > > in to a new vet's office and he said, "Oh, my, we have a senior
citizen
> > > > here!"
> > >
> > > Did you think he meant you? :)
> > >
> >
> > :) No.
> >
> > I was offended on behalf of my kitty.
>
> I know; just teasing.
>
> But really there is nothing wrong with being a "senior citizen." I keep
> saying that more and more the closer I get to being one. :)
>

I will feel honored if I make it that far! I hope to grow old gracefully,
without acting like a lot of people seem to --trying to recapture
lost youth in various silly ways.

I don't buy into the "glorification of youth" part of this culture.

I remember being 20-something. It was not all it's cracked up to be,
although, it admittedly LOOKED better, heh!

meee
February 3rd 06, 02:11 AM
"Diane" > wrote in message
link.net...
> In article >, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
>> "Diane" > wrote in message
>> link.net...
>> > In article >, "cybercat" >
>> > wrote:
>> >
>> > > She was 18 years old and I felt a little twinge of resentment when we
>> walked
>> > > in to a new vet's office and he said, "Oh, my, we have a senior
>> > > citizen
>> > > here!"
>> >
>> > Did you think he meant you? :)
>> >
>>
>> :) No.
>>
>> I was offended on behalf of my kitty.
>
> I know; just teasing.
>
> But really there is nothing wrong with being a "senior citizen." I keep
> saying that more and more the closer I get to being one. :)
>
> --
I'm looking forward to being a senior citizen!!! I'm still a long way off
yet, but it looks fun from here! you get to boast about your kids, enjoy
your grandkids, and have lots of cats and spend all day in the garden. I am
tossing up whether I'll be a mad cat lady or a nice old grandma who's
secretly a spy. no, but seriously, you've raised your kids, you get to stuff
the grandkids full of chocolate then send them home, and you can work for
your own pleasure and wealth, and not because little johnny wants to go to
soccer club.
> Web site: http://www.slywy.com/
> Message board: http://www.slywy.com/phpBB2/
> Journal: http://slywy.blogspot.com/

Steve Crane
February 3rd 06, 02:23 AM
Rhonda wrote:
> At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
> that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
> though, it might be time for senior blood tests.
>
> Rhonda

That's a very interesting question. Next is at what age does a cat
pass from being a "senior" cat to a "geriatric" cat? From a medical
point of view a big change in cats occurs around 6-7 years of age and
then once again around 12-14. Cats under age 7 generally get into
trouble with struvite stones, cats over age 6 generally get calcium
oxalate stones. With that in mind altering urine pH output in senior
cat foods makes some sense as it addresses the more common risk.

Purina Pro Plan just introduced a 4th lifestage in cats - what they are
calling 11+. So you have kitten up to one year, adult 1 to 7 years,
mature adult 7 years to 11 years and Senior 11+. There is some good
data on cats at age 12-14 having a whole new set of problems. Instead
of weight gain at age 7, they are more likely to have weight loss
problems.

Steve Crane

NMR
February 3rd 06, 02:25 AM
"meee" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Diane" > wrote in message
> link.net...
>> In article >, "cybercat" >
>> wrote:
>>
>>> "Diane" > wrote in message
>>> link.net...
>>> > In article >, "cybercat" >
>>> > wrote:
>>> >
>>> > > She was 18 years old and I felt a little twinge of resentment when
>>> > > we
>>> walked
>>> > > in to a new vet's office and he said, "Oh, my, we have a senior
>>> > > citizen
>>> > > here!"
>>> >
>>> > Did you think he meant you? :)
>>> >
>>>
>>> :) No.
>>>
>>> I was offended on behalf of my kitty.
>>
>> I know; just teasing.
>>
>> But really there is nothing wrong with being a "senior citizen." I keep
>> saying that more and more the closer I get to being one. :)
>>
>> --
> I'm looking forward to being a senior citizen!!! I'm still a long way off
> yet, but it looks fun from here! you get to boast about your kids, enjoy
> your grandkids, and have lots of cats and spend all day in the garden. I
> am tossing up whether I'll be a mad cat lady or a nice old grandma who's
> secretly a spy. no, but seriously, you've raised your kids, you get to
> stuff the grandkids full of chocolate then send them home, and you can
> work for your own pleasure and wealth, and not because little johnny wants
> to go to soccer club.


I am already there it ain't all the hype you think :-)

Perry Justus
February 3rd 06, 02:34 AM
On 2 Feb 2006 18:23:26 -0800, "Steve Crane" > wrote:

>
>Rhonda wrote:
>> At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
>> that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
>> though, it might be time for senior blood tests.
>>
>> Rhonda
>
>That's a very interesting question. Next is at what age does a cat
>pass from being a "senior" cat to a "geriatric" cat? From a medical
>point of view a big change in cats occurs around 6-7 years of age and
>then once again around 12-14. Cats under age 7 generally get into
>trouble with struvite stones, cats over age 6 generally get calcium
>oxalate stones. With that in mind altering urine pH output in senior
>cat foods makes some sense as it addresses the more common risk.
>
>Purina Pro Plan just introduced a 4th lifestage in cats - what they are
>calling 11+. So you have kitten up to one year, adult 1 to 7 years,
>mature adult 7 years to 11 years and Senior 11+. There is some good
>data on cats at age 12-14 having a whole new set of problems. Instead
>of weight gain at age 7, they are more likely to have weight loss
>problems.
>
>Steve Crane

I always viewed 10-15 as senior and 15 and on as geriatric.

Perry

cybercat
February 3rd 06, 02:45 AM
"Perry Justus" > wrote in message
...
> On 2 Feb 2006 18:23:26 -0800, "Steve Crane" > wrote:
>
> >
> >Rhonda wrote:
> >> At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
> >> that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
> >> though, it might be time for senior blood tests.
> >>
> >> Rhonda
> >
> >That's a very interesting question. Next is at what age does a cat
> >pass from being a "senior" cat to a "geriatric" cat? From a medical
> >point of view a big change in cats occurs around 6-7 years of age and
> >then once again around 12-14. Cats under age 7 generally get into
> >trouble with struvite stones, cats over age 6 generally get calcium
> >oxalate stones. With that in mind altering urine pH output in senior
> >cat foods makes some sense as it addresses the more common risk.
> >
> >Purina Pro Plan just introduced a 4th lifestage in cats - what they are
> >calling 11+. So you have kitten up to one year, adult 1 to 7 years,
> >mature adult 7 years to 11 years and Senior 11+. There is some good
> >data on cats at age 12-14 having a whole new set of problems. Instead
> >of weight gain at age 7, they are more likely to have weight loss
> >problems.
> >
> >Steve Crane
>
> I always viewed 10-15 as senior and 15 and on as geriatric.
>

That seems reasonable.

meee
February 3rd 06, 03:02 AM
"NMR" > wrote in message
...
>
> "meee" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Diane" > wrote in message
>> link.net...
>>> In article >, "cybercat" >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> "Diane" > wrote in message
>>>> link.net...
>>>> > In article >, "cybercat"
>>>> > >
>>>> > wrote:
>>>> >
>>>> > > She was 18 years old and I felt a little twinge of resentment when
>>>> > > we
>>>> walked
>>>> > > in to a new vet's office and he said, "Oh, my, we have a senior
>>>> > > citizen
>>>> > > here!"
>>>> >
>>>> > Did you think he meant you? :)
>>>> >
>>>>
>>>> :) No.
>>>>
>>>> I was offended on behalf of my kitty.
>>>
>>> I know; just teasing.
>>>
>>> But really there is nothing wrong with being a "senior citizen." I keep
>>> saying that more and more the closer I get to being one. :)
>>>
>>> --
>> I'm looking forward to being a senior citizen!!! I'm still a long way off
>> yet, but it looks fun from here! you get to boast about your kids, enjoy
>> your grandkids, and have lots of cats and spend all day in the garden. I
>> am tossing up whether I'll be a mad cat lady or a nice old grandma who's
>> secretly a spy. no, but seriously, you've raised your kids, you get to
>> stuff the grandkids full of chocolate then send them home, and you can
>> work for your own pleasure and wealth, and not because little johnny
>> wants to go to soccer club.
>
>
> I am already there it ain't all the hype you think :-)
>
yeah, well I know there's down sides, I'm not that silly. i just prefer to
view old age as not so bad instead of the AAARGHH!!! WRINKLES!! response our
society advocates so strongly.

NMR
February 3rd 06, 03:04 AM
"meee" > wrote in message
...
>
> "NMR" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "meee" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>> "Diane" > wrote in message
>>> link.net...
>>>> In article >, "cybercat" >
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> "Diane" > wrote in message
>>>>> link.net...
>>>>> > In article >, "cybercat"
>>>>> > >
>>>>> > wrote:
>>>>> >
>>>>> > > She was 18 years old and I felt a little twinge of resentment when
>>>>> > > we
>>>>> walked
>>>>> > > in to a new vet's office and he said, "Oh, my, we have a senior
>>>>> > > citizen
>>>>> > > here!"
>>>>> >
>>>>> > Did you think he meant you? :)
>>>>> >
>>>>>
>>>>> :) No.
>>>>>
>>>>> I was offended on behalf of my kitty.
>>>>
>>>> I know; just teasing.
>>>>
>>>> But really there is nothing wrong with being a "senior citizen." I keep
>>>> saying that more and more the closer I get to being one. :)
>>>>
>>>> --
>>> I'm looking forward to being a senior citizen!!! I'm still a long way
>>> off yet, but it looks fun from here! you get to boast about your kids,
>>> enjoy your grandkids, and have lots of cats and spend all day in the
>>> garden. I am tossing up whether I'll be a mad cat lady or a nice old
>>> grandma who's secretly a spy. no, but seriously, you've raised your
>>> kids, you get to stuff the grandkids full of chocolate then send them
>>> home, and you can work for your own pleasure and wealth, and not because
>>> little johnny wants to go to soccer club.
>>
>>
>> I am already there it ain't all the hype you think :-)
>>
> yeah, well I know there's down sides, I'm not that silly. i just prefer to
> view old age as not so bad instead of the AAARGHH!!! WRINKLES!! response
> our society advocates so strongly.
>
Mine is AAARGHH!!! arthritis

Spot
February 3rd 06, 03:29 AM
If this is like the dog food with the glucosamine in you really aren't
giving them the optimum dose to do any real good. If you look at the
content per serving compared to what they should get for optimum benefit
it's not much. If you feed the food along with a supplement then it's much
better but I wouldn't rely only on the food for the supplement.

Celeste



> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Lesley wrote:
>> Rhonda wrote:
>>
>> > At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
>> > that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
>> > though, it might be time for senior blood tests.
>> >
>> According to a box of dried food I read once 8 is senior. I looked down
>> at Isis and said "You're an old lady now" but she was too busy chasing
>> her tail to notice....Since she lived to be over 16 from what it said
>> on that box, she spent over half her life as a senior but she was still
>> playful until a few days before she died
>>
>
> I actually tried Royal Canin food (more expensive than I was used to
> paying) because the package said a senior was 15+. Finally, a cat food
> maker that knows what a senior cat is. And they add glucosamine to the
> food and actually do something for a senior.
>
> I got a couple sample packets from the representitive at the cat show.
> Tried it with Maynard who was 18. He perked up. I knew he had
> arthtritis, and had been giving him glucoasmine which helped, but he
> got tired of the fish flavored tablets and wouldn't eat them every day.
> With the new kibble, I could see him walking faster, sometimes
> trotting, and taking the stairs better. The sample ran out, and he
> slowed down. I bought a bag of the food and he was better again. I was
> really impressed.
>
> They have changed the senior food to two types of "mature" - active and
> indoor. Basically for more active older cats and less active older
> cats. Both have glucosamine. Kira is only 11, but I decided to put her
> on the active mature. Rather than wait for her to be obvious in slowing
> down, I'd like to know that she is getting the extras for seniors.
>

meee
February 3rd 06, 03:33 AM
"NMR" > wrote in message
.. .
>
> "meee" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "NMR" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>> "meee" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>>
>>>> "Diane" > wrote in message
>>>> link.net...
>>>>> In article >, "cybercat" >
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> "Diane" > wrote in message
>>>>>> link.net...
>>>>>> > In article >, "cybercat"
>>>>>> > >
>>>>>> > wrote:
>>>>>> >
>>>>>> > > She was 18 years old and I felt a little twinge of resentment
>>>>>> > > when we
>>>>>> walked
>>>>>> > > in to a new vet's office and he said, "Oh, my, we have a senior
>>>>>> > > citizen
>>>>>> > > here!"
>>>>>> >
>>>>>> > Did you think he meant you? :)
>>>>>> >
>>>>>>
>>>>>> :) No.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I was offended on behalf of my kitty.
>>>>>
>>>>> I know; just teasing.
>>>>>
>>>>> But really there is nothing wrong with being a "senior citizen." I
>>>>> keep
>>>>> saying that more and more the closer I get to being one. :)
>>>>>
>>>>> --
>>>> I'm looking forward to being a senior citizen!!! I'm still a long way
>>>> off yet, but it looks fun from here! you get to boast about your kids,
>>>> enjoy your grandkids, and have lots of cats and spend all day in the
>>>> garden. I am tossing up whether I'll be a mad cat lady or a nice old
>>>> grandma who's secretly a spy. no, but seriously, you've raised your
>>>> kids, you get to stuff the grandkids full of chocolate then send them
>>>> home, and you can work for your own pleasure and wealth, and not
>>>> because little johnny wants to go to soccer club.
>>>
>>>
>>> I am already there it ain't all the hype you think :-)
>>>
>> yeah, well I know there's down sides, I'm not that silly. i just prefer
>> to view old age as not so bad instead of the AAARGHH!!! WRINKLES!!
>> response our society advocates so strongly.
>>
> Mine is AAARGHH!!! arthritis
>
well, I'm in for that in not too many years anyway....bad joints run in my
fambly, so it only gets worse from here! I mainly control it through diet at
the mo, but there's not much that can be done. right now it's carpal tunnel
too.

John Doe
February 3rd 06, 03:35 AM
"meee" > wrote:

>
> right now it's carpal tunnel too.

If you can speak well enough to be understood by a stupid computer
program, speech recognition (Dragon naturally speaking and a fast
computer) is the cure for CPS, especially if you enjoy writing. Good
luck.

February 3rd 06, 06:14 AM
Spot wrote:
> If this is like the dog food with the glucosamine in you really aren't
> giving them the optimum dose to do any real good. If you look at the
> content per serving compared to what they should get for optimum benefit
> it's not much. If you feed the food along with a supplement then it's much
> better but I wouldn't rely only on the food for the supplement.
>

I don't have the old tablets to compare it to, but the amount in the
food is pretty good. And I noticed an obvious improvement when I
started the new food, ran out, and started it again. Unless something
else in the food did the job, then it has to be the glucosamine.
Personally, he was doing as well as when he used to eat the daily
tablets and a lot better than when he wasn't eating the tablets.

You can believe what you want, but the senior food was a miracle for
Maynard. I saw him trotting and showing some spunk again. And he was
taking the stairs at normal speed. That food made the difference for
him.

And when I got Jay Jay, I got the Maine Coon food for him. With my
regular food, he had very stinky poop (I'm surprised you all couldn't
smell it across the country, it was so bad). Even the vet commented
that usually poop doesn't smell that bad unless there is something
wrong with the cat (and they didn't find anything). He was also gaining
weight like crazy. He was chowing like crazy, inhaling the food. When I
got the Maine Coon food, he ate slower (larger kibbles), and his poop
stopped stinking so bad. Now, I only smell it if I walk by the litter
box right after he went (he doesn't cover it). He doesn't produce stink
bombs anymore.

So, I am quite happy with the food. I have seen great results in two
cats that needed improvements. So, I will keep Jay Jay on the Maine
Coon food Kira on the active mature.

jmc
February 3rd 06, 07:43 AM
Suddenly, without warning, meee exclaimed (03-Feb-06 2:11 AM):
> "Diane" > wrote in message
> link.net...
>> In article >, "cybercat" >
>> wrote:
>>
>>> "Diane" > wrote in message
>>> link.net...
>>>> In article >, "cybercat" >
>>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> She was 18 years old and I felt a little twinge of resentment when we
>>> walked
>>>>> in to a new vet's office and he said, "Oh, my, we have a senior
>>>>> citizen
>>>>> here!"
>>>> Did you think he meant you? :)
>>>>
>>> :) No.
>>>
>>> I was offended on behalf of my kitty.
>> I know; just teasing.
>>
>> But really there is nothing wrong with being a "senior citizen." I keep
>> saying that more and more the closer I get to being one. :)
>>
>> --
> I'm looking forward to being a senior citizen!!! I'm still a long way off
> yet, but it looks fun from here! you get to boast about your kids, enjoy
> your grandkids, and have lots of cats and spend all day in the garden. I am
> tossing up whether I'll be a mad cat lady or a nice old grandma who's
> secretly a spy. no, but seriously, you've raised your kids, you get to stuff
> the grandkids full of chocolate then send them home, and you can work for
> your own pleasure and wealth, and not because little johnny wants to go to
> soccer club.
>> Web site: http://www.slywy.com/
>> Message board: http://www.slywy.com/phpBB2/
>> Journal: http://slywy.blogspot.com/
>
>

No kids here but I want to be the nice old lady who is the mad cat lady
and is a spy :) (who would suspect?)

Seriously, I think the secret to old age is having pets and horses. I
read about (and have met) so many people who have horses and are active
and riding well past their eighties. I want that to be me. What good's
old age if you can't enjoy it?

jmc

meee
February 3rd 06, 07:54 AM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, meee exclaimed (03-Feb-06 2:11 AM):
>> "Diane" > wrote in message
>> link.net...
>>> In article >, "cybercat" >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> "Diane" > wrote in message
>>>> link.net...
>>>>> In article >, "cybercat" >
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> She was 18 years old and I felt a little twinge of resentment when we
>>>> walked
>>>>>> in to a new vet's office and he said, "Oh, my, we have a senior
>>>>>> citizen
>>>>>> here!"
>>>>> Did you think he meant you? :)
>>>>>
>>>> :) No.
>>>>
>>>> I was offended on behalf of my kitty.
>>> I know; just teasing.
>>>
>>> But really there is nothing wrong with being a "senior citizen." I keep
>>> saying that more and more the closer I get to being one. :)
>>>
>>> --
>> I'm looking forward to being a senior citizen!!! I'm still a long way off
>> yet, but it looks fun from here! you get to boast about your kids, enjoy
>> your grandkids, and have lots of cats and spend all day in the garden. I
>> am tossing up whether I'll be a mad cat lady or a nice old grandma who's
>> secretly a spy. no, but seriously, you've raised your kids, you get to
>> stuff the grandkids full of chocolate then send them home, and you can
>> work for your own pleasure and wealth, and not because little johnny
>> wants to go to soccer club.
>>> Web site: http://www.slywy.com/
>>> Message board: http://www.slywy.com/phpBB2/
>>> Journal: http://slywy.blogspot.com/
>>
>>
>
> No kids here but I want to be the nice old lady who is the mad cat lady
> and is a spy :) (who would suspect?)

I know, that's the fun of it!! And being an old lady, you can 'borrow' your
friends Grandkids. Older ladies seem to have a right to stop and coo over
every little child.
>
> Seriously, I think the secret to old age is having pets and horses. I
> read about (and have met) so many people who have horses and are active
> and riding well past their eighties. I want that to be me. What good's
> old age if you can't enjoy it?
>
> jmc

Oh, that's right!! I am 'saving' some things for when I get older...instead
of being in a rush to do everything now, I am looking forward to the time
when I won't have to 'behave' or worry about what people will say, because
I'll be old and no-one will care. As Grandpa Simpson put it, 'I'm old, it's
my right to complain' And horses will definitely be part of my old age!!

yngver
February 3rd 06, 05:18 PM
Steve Crane wrote:
> Rhonda wrote:
> > At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
> > that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
> > though, it might be time for senior blood tests.
> >
> > Rhonda
>
> That's a very interesting question. Next is at what age does a cat
> pass from being a "senior" cat to a "geriatric" cat? From a medical
> point of view a big change in cats occurs around 6-7 years of age and
> then once again around 12-14. Cats under age 7 generally get into
> trouble with struvite stones, cats over age 6 generally get calcium
> oxalate stones. With that in mind altering urine pH output in senior
> cat foods makes some sense as it addresses the more common risk.
>
> Purina Pro Plan just introduced a 4th lifestage in cats - what they are
> calling 11+. So you have kitten up to one year, adult 1 to 7 years,
> mature adult 7 years to 11 years and Senior 11+. There is some good
> data on cats at age 12-14 having a whole new set of problems. Instead
> of weight gain at age 7, they are more likely to have weight loss
> problems.
>
> Steve Crane

Our cat clinic starts doing geriatric panels at age 7. I personally
don't consider our 8 year old cats geriatric, but I guess "mature
adult" sounds better. We have two 8 year old cats and all of a sudden
our vet bills got a lot higher, but it's worth it if anything turns up.
I'd say by the age of ten, it probably is time to start getting
geriatric panels done. As to whether to switch to senior foods, my
concern is that with one of our cats it's always been hard to keep her
weight up--she's very active and also finicky. I'm worried there are
not enough calories in senior foods but on the other hand I don't want
to make her more susceptible to urinary problems either.
-Yngver

Rhonda
February 3rd 06, 07:45 PM
Thanks for all of the comments and opinions.

Guess it's time to keep an eye on our Senior Kitten. She is our former
feral who was an older kitten when caught. She stays mostly under the
bed, even at 10 years old -- so I'm a bit concerned I'll miss health
problems with her. She normally comes out at night and sleeps with me.

It would probably be worth it to haul her out and get a blood test.

Rhonda

Perry Justus
February 3rd 06, 09:36 PM
On 3 Feb 2006 09:18:29 -0800, "yngver" > wrote:

>
>Steve Crane wrote:
>> Rhonda wrote:
>> > At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
>> > that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
>> > though, it might be time for senior blood tests.
>> >
>> > Rhonda
>>
>> That's a very interesting question. Next is at what age does a cat
>> pass from being a "senior" cat to a "geriatric" cat? From a medical
>> point of view a big change in cats occurs around 6-7 years of age and
>> then once again around 12-14. Cats under age 7 generally get into
>> trouble with struvite stones, cats over age 6 generally get calcium
>> oxalate stones. With that in mind altering urine pH output in senior
>> cat foods makes some sense as it addresses the more common risk.
>>
>> Purina Pro Plan just introduced a 4th lifestage in cats - what they are
>> calling 11+. So you have kitten up to one year, adult 1 to 7 years,
>> mature adult 7 years to 11 years and Senior 11+. There is some good
>> data on cats at age 12-14 having a whole new set of problems. Instead
>> of weight gain at age 7, they are more likely to have weight loss
>> problems.
>>
>> Steve Crane
>
>Our cat clinic starts doing geriatric panels at age 7. I personally
>don't consider our 8 year old cats geriatric, but I guess "mature
>adult" sounds better. We have two 8 year old cats and all of a sudden
>our vet bills got a lot higher, but it's worth it if anything turns up.
> I'd say by the age of ten, it probably is time to start getting
>geriatric panels done. As to whether to switch to senior foods, my
>concern is that with one of our cats it's always been hard to keep her
>weight up--she's very active and also finicky. I'm worried there are
>not enough calories in senior foods but on the other hand I don't want
>to make her more susceptible to urinary problems either.
>-Yngver

I don't know... maybe I'm in denial, but geriatric panels at age seven
(or even 10) sounds ridiculous to me. Five of my cats are either ten
or older, and only two of them seem older than a couple of years.
Notice I said *seem* -- I don't know what's going on, but they play
like kittens and are sleek as ever.

Perry

yngver
February 7th 06, 11:21 PM
Perry Justus wrote:
> On 3 Feb 2006 09:18:29 -0800, "yngver" > wrote:

> >
> >Our cat clinic starts doing geriatric panels at age 7. I personally
> >don't consider our 8 year old cats geriatric, but I guess "mature
> >adult" sounds better. We have two 8 year old cats and all of a sudden
> >our vet bills got a lot higher, but it's worth it if anything turns up.
> > I'd say by the age of ten, it probably is time to start getting
> >geriatric panels done. As to whether to switch to senior foods, my
> >concern is that with one of our cats it's always been hard to keep her
> >weight up--she's very active and also finicky. I'm worried there are
> >not enough calories in senior foods but on the other hand I don't want
> >to make her more susceptible to urinary problems either.
> >-Yngver
>
> I don't know... maybe I'm in denial, but geriatric panels at age seven
> (or even 10) sounds ridiculous to me. Five of my cats are either ten
> or older, and only two of them seem older than a couple of years.
> Notice I said *seem* -- I don't know what's going on, but they play
> like kittens and are sleek as ever.
>
> Perry

Well, it's hard for me to consider our 8 year old cats geriatric
either, but I think it's fairly common now for vets to start
recommending geriatric panels (blood and urine screen) at age 7. I was
just glad they didn't start recommending twice yearly checkups--but
maybe that comes at a later age.

Years ago with my last cat, who lived to age 17, I don't think back
then vets did routine screenings just due to the cat's being older.
Actually if they had, my cat's liver problem probably would have been
discovered sooner--although I'm not sure ultimately it would have
prolonged her life.
-Yngver

Anna via CatKB.com
February 8th 06, 06:22 PM
>I don't know... maybe I'm in denial, but geriatric panels at age seven
>(or even 10) sounds ridiculous to me.

That's what I used to think too which is why when my vet suggested blood and
urine testing at 7 I said no and waited till 9. My cat tested positive for
early kidney disease! I had no idea, didn't notice any symtoms at all. So
it could have already been there at 7 and I would have know if I had it done.



Anna

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200602/1

Anna via CatKB.com
February 8th 06, 06:25 PM
>At what age would you call a cat a senior cat? We have a 10 year old
>that I'd love to continue to think of as a kitten. I was thinking
>though, it might be time for senior blood tests.

Definitely get blood and urine test. Cats are good at hiding illness. Mine
tested positive for kidney disease at 9 and you'd never know she had it.
Acted totally normal. Yes, they look young and act young on the outside but
who knows what's going on on the inside.


Anna

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200602/1

NMR
February 15th 06, 06:55 PM
"John Doe" >

BEWARE HE IS A STALKER AND A TROLL BEWARE
FOLLOWS YOU TO OTHER GROUPS AND INSULTS THEM AND POST BS ABOUT THEM

HE NEEDS A TASTE OF HIS OWN MEDICINE