PDA

View Full Version : Advice for choosing cat / cats


Gabstar
February 5th 06, 07:12 PM
Hi, I'm hoping to become a cat owner soon, and I'm looking for some
advice in choosing my new cat or cats. I've never owned a cat before,
but I'm an animal lover and I have kept dogs and rats in the past, so
I'm aware of the commitment involved in keeping a pet.

I live in a large three-bedroomed maisonette with sitting room and
kitchen on the 1st floor (UK, so I mean one storey up), bedrooms on the
2nd floor and entrances to the front and back on the ground floor. To
the front is a large driveway, and to the rear is a large walled
garden. The major problem is that there's a busy road one garden away,
but our next door neighbours keep an outdoor cat (and have done for
years) with no problems.

I live with my partner. We are both at work all day (although it's not
far from home, so we could go call at home at lunchtime for the short
term). There are no children or other pets in the house. As I see it,
I have the following options:-

1. Get an adult indoor cat.
2. Get a kitten and keep it as an indoor cat (not sure if this is
feasible when I'm out all day).
3. Get two kittens to keep as indoor cats (to keep each other company).
4. Get a cat or kitten and let it go out (but I'd be devastated if it
got hit by traffic).
5. Forget getting a cat... (I'd really like one, but not if it's not in
the best interests of the cat).

It would be really helpful to hear what the experienced cat owners out
there think. Thanks.

NMR
February 5th 06, 07:29 PM
"Gabstar" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Hi, I'm hoping to become a cat owner soon, and I'm looking for some
> advice in choosing my new cat or cats. I've never owned a cat before,
> but I'm an animal lover and I have kept dogs and rats in the past, so
> I'm aware of the commitment involved in keeping a pet.
>
> I live in a large three-bedroomed maisonette with sitting room and
> kitchen on the 1st floor (UK, so I mean one storey up), bedrooms on the
> 2nd floor and entrances to the front and back on the ground floor. To
> the front is a large driveway, and to the rear is a large walled
> garden. The major problem is that there's a busy road one garden away,
> but our next door neighbors keep an outdoor cat (and have done for
> years) with no problems.

No problems that you know of the cat has been one lucky feline but an out
door cat has a much shorter lifespan than an indoor cat which can live past
20 with easy and proper medical treatment

> I live with my partner. We are both at work all day (although it's not
> far from home, so we could go call at home at lunchtime for the short
> term). There are no children or other pets in the house. As I see it,
> I have the following options:-
>
> 1. Get an adult indoor cat.

Doesn't actually has to be an adult cat but can be a juvenile cat a little
older than a kitten about 6 to 7 months just never declaw unless medical
necessary

> 2. Get a kitten and keep it as an indoor cat (not sure if this is feasible
> when I'm out all day).

Very feasible You said it your self you live next to a busy road if you
have an outdoor cat it might be lucky for a while but not for long with
these [email protected]@hole drivers out there plus evil neighbors too many things to name
that could happen

> 3. Get two kittens to keep as indoor cats (to keep each other company).

Excellent idea if you do this try to get litter mates they will get along
the best just remember to get them vaccinated and neutered PLEASE

> 4. Get a cat or kitten and let it go out (but I'd be devastated if it got
> hit by traffic).

No loving parent would do this next to a busy road I don't care what others
will say about letting their cats out Unless you are in the UK where there
is limited traffic and predators. There are man made predators and nature's
predator that will take you cat's life in a heart beat

> 5. Forget getting a cat... (I'd really like one, but not if it's not in
> the best interests of the cat).

This is for you to decide do you really want to be a pet owner you have
several things to look at food cost, vet bills, maintance, the love factor.
Plenty of people go to work all day and love their furballs at night there
is nothing wrong with this.

Claude V. Lucas
February 5th 06, 07:31 PM
In article . com>,
Gabstar > wrote:
>Hi, I'm hoping to become a cat owner soon, and I'm looking for some
>advice in choosing my new cat or cats. I've never owned a cat before,
>but I'm an animal lover and I have kept dogs and rats in the past, so
>I'm aware of the commitment involved in keeping a pet.
>
>I live in a large three-bedroomed maisonette with sitting room and
>kitchen on the 1st floor (UK, so I mean one storey up), bedrooms on the
>2nd floor and entrances to the front and back on the ground floor. To
>the front is a large driveway, and to the rear is a large walled
>garden. The major problem is that there's a busy road one garden away,
>but our next door neighbours keep an outdoor cat (and have done for
>years) with no problems.
>
>I live with my partner. We are both at work all day (although it's not
>far from home, so we could go call at home at lunchtime for the short
>term). There are no children or other pets in the house. As I see it,
>I have the following options:-
>
>1. Get an adult indoor cat.
>2. Get a kitten and keep it as an indoor cat (not sure if this is
>feasible when I'm out all day).
>3. Get two kittens to keep as indoor cats (to keep each other company).
>4. Get a cat or kitten and let it go out (but I'd be devastated if it
>got hit by traffic).
>5. Forget getting a cat... (I'd really like one, but not if it's not in
>the best interests of the cat).
>
>It would be really helpful to hear what the experienced cat owners out
>there think. Thanks.
>

Hi

My suggestion would be to adopt from your local shelter.

The choice of kitten or adult is really a matter of your preference

If you are going to leave it alone for much of the day it might
not be a bad idea to get two to keep each other company if you have
the space.

Keep them indoors if you can. Some cats, like mine, prefer it
and it is probably much safer for them.

Have them fixed, even though they are not broken.

When you are choosing the cat(s) allow them to choose you rather
than picking one by appearance or breed. This will help insure
that your new friend(s) have an attraction to you as well as
the other way around.

Have a vet look them over when you get them to make sure there
are no problems.

Obey every whim of your new master(s)


Claude

Gabstar
February 7th 06, 07:34 PM
Thanks for your helpful replies.

We have pretty much decided to get a couple of kittens, but I'm still
worried about leaving them on their own all day when we first get them.
In particular, I read that until kittens are fully litter trained, you
should leave them shut in a small room, close to their litter tray when
you're not around to keep an eye on them. It seems a bit mean to me to
leave them shut in a room all day while I'm at work until they catch
on. What do you think?

Priscilla H. Ballou
February 7th 06, 08:13 PM
In article . com>,
"Gabstar" > wrote:

> Thanks for your helpful replies.
>
> We have pretty much decided to get a couple of kittens, but I'm still
> worried about leaving them on their own all day when we first get them.
> In particular, I read that until kittens are fully litter trained, you
> should leave them shut in a small room, close to their litter tray when
> you're not around to keep an eye on them. It seems a bit mean to me to
> leave them shut in a room all day while I'm at work until they catch
> on. What do you think?

Any cat will probably do better if it's introduced to a new space
slowly. Starting with one room is a really good idea. Once they're
comfortable playing with you in that one room (one or more days, even a
week), then start introducing them to the other rooms. I'd carry them
around so they could see everything before letting them totally loose --
or if you have a cage, put them in the cage and move it around so the
sights and sounds will be familiar before they have to get upclose and
personal with them.

Priscilla

Anna via CatKB.com
February 7th 06, 10:27 PM
>We have pretty much decided to get a couple of kittens, but I'm still
>worried about leaving them on their own all day when we first get them.
>In particular, I read that until kittens are fully litter trained, you
>should leave them shut in a small room, close to their litter tray when
>you're not around to keep an eye on them. It seems a bit mean to me to
>leave them shut in a room all day while I'm at work until they catch

But the room looks *very* big to a kitten so I don't think it's mean at all.
Plus they'll have each other. Kittens are so curious and mischievious it's
probably a good idea to do this unless you know for sure there is nothing
they can get into: Make sure they have everything they need and they should
be okay. If you do decide to leave them out while you're gone, some advice
on things to not leave out:

- String (one of mine ate some when she was a kitten and when she went to the
bathroom some of it came out and she went running furiously around the room
with it half in/half out; I foolishly pulled it which I later learned I
wasn't supposed to do (in case it was wrapped around her intestines).

- Put top down on toilet bowls - one of mine jumped in

- Strings on blinds should be clipped in two if they make a loop (one of mine
got his head in one and wrapped it around his neck - I found him that way as
I was home, just in another room! Scary!

- Watch when you open things like the dryer - they can jump in there after
you pull out the clothes and you can accidently shut the door on them not
knowing they're in there. Once when I was taking something out of the oven,
my kitten got that funny look on her face they get when they're about to jump
into something. I shut the door quickly - I think she was actually going to
run and jump in the oven and it was hot!

Kittens are crazy! and they hardly ever sleep. Be prepared to have your
toes attacked and nibbled on when you're sleeping and running up and down the
hallway at all hours. They also like to climb your legs like a scratch post
and play with your hair (if it's long). On the plus side, they're also
extremely funny to watch and cuddly when they're tired. What you will need
most of all is patience; just remember, they will grow out of it eventually
and settle down. But for some people, they are hard to handle. I used to
volunteer at a shelter and there were sometimes exasperated phone calls from
people asking when they calm down and even one who wanted to return them.
But once they get older, you'll miss when they were crazy kittens (okay,
maybe just a little).

Anna

PS I've never had 2 kittens at the same time - I think that's better -
they'll tire each other out. That's what I should have done.

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

Anna via CatKB.com
February 7th 06, 10:33 PM
Oh, I should mention my kittens were only 3 weeks old (orphaned) 8 weeks old
and 10 weeks old. It's when they're really young like this that they're
super crazy. I'd say any cat under 6 months old is quite active but more so
at only a couple of months old.


Anna

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

Veloise
February 8th 06, 03:51 AM
Anna via CatKB.com wrote:
....
> Kittens are crazy! and they hardly ever sleep. Be prepared to have your
> toes attacked and nibbled on when you're sleeping and running up and down the
> hallway at all hours. They also like to climb your legs like a scratch post
> and play with your hair (if it's long). On the plus side, they're also
> extremely funny to watch and cuddly when they're tired. What you will need
> most of all is patience; just remember, they will grow out of it eventually
> and settle down. But for some people, they are hard to handle. I used to
> volunteer at a shelter and there were sometimes exasperated phone calls from
> people asking when they calm down and even one who wanted to return them.
> But once they get older, you'll miss when they were crazy kittens (okay,
> maybe just a little).

They sleep during the day while Pinkie is out earning money for cat
food, resting up for the noctural assault.

Plan to play with them for about an hour every evening before you go to
bed, if you want any sleep.

HTH

--Karen D.
yep, get two kitties to keep each other company

Ellie Bentley
February 22nd 06, 08:26 PM
Gabstar,

Get two kittens, preferably siblings - already used to each other. (It
doesn't matter if they're both males provided you exercise discipline,
reward them with a cat-biscuit everytime you catch them "being good"
with each other.) When cats have had enough sleep they will let off
energy in whatever way they can. A sole cat will focus on your
furnishings: but two cats will play with each other. Note: spoilsport
humans say "No!" every time cats wrestle, equating it to "fighting".
Let them "fight". If you exercise good discipline and routine, you'll
find them curled up beside each other sleeping 10 minutes after they've
had a bout of wrestling!

As for your busy road, you are just going to have to keep your fingers
crossed. Do all you can not to accustom your cats to cars and engines.
Cats are naturally wary of big moving vehicles. Keep them that way.
For instance, don't be frightened to let them be scared by a car coming
up your driveway. That way, they'll hopefully keep away from that busy
road.

However, I suggest you limit their outdoor time, even when they're
grown. For the first six months, keep them inside. They'll learn this
is home, the safety zone. After that take the kittens out for brief
walks in your walled garden. React negatively if they seek to go beyond
it, they'll get the message that you don't like it, but of course, they
WILL venture afield anyway. Even when they're a year old and you start
to let them have time outside unaccompanied, limit their outside time to
a fixed period everyday. Cats LOVE routine. They'll respect it. It
sounds like you're both out working each weekday, so when the cats are
grown their outdoor adventure should start soon after you arrive home.
But with dark evenings you'll have a bit of a problem. It'll be easier
in the summer.

Yes, some people keep their cats continually indoors, but if you do that
you really do have a responsibility to go to considerable lengths to
make your indoor environment a cat paradise. Firstly, keep no-go areas
to a minimum. In our house just one of the two kitchen worksurfaces is
completely no-go - when we're around (of course, they're up there in the
middle of the night or when we're out). Our cats are allowed absolutely
everywhere else in the house, even when guests are with us - a cat will
jump up onto a sofa-back and then up onto a high bookshelf, peering down
at the humans. If you give indoor cats this freedom to enjoy the
indoors they'll be happy. Give them special structures too though: like
a tree-trunk that goes from floor to ceiling, bound with sisal rope all
the way up. Even if you clip your cats' claws each week (to minimise
damage to you, them, and the furnishings) they'll still be able to whip
up and down that tree trunk. Go further than this if you like and
attach some horizontal planks high up: give them aerial walkways and
things. By doing all this, your cats will be really fulfilled inside,
and if you do it artistically it can all look very attractive!

Lastly, treat a cat with discipline, respect, and LOVE and even the
mangiest bad-tempered most-revolting-puss-in-the-shelter will transform
into an absolutely loving creature that will be eager to snuggle under
the duvet with you at night!

Cats are wonderful creatures. We love ours to death and that love is
returned dozens of times each day.

Ellie.