PDA

View Full Version : Indoor vs. Outdoor Dilemma


February 9th 06, 07:49 AM
I know the general topic has _certainly_ been addressed here a million
times, but I'd like to hear some brainstorming on how I can get around
the problem in my own future situation.

My wife and I have three cats (2-3 years old) that were raised entirely
as happy, laid-back indoor cats. In a couple months, we should be
moving, though, and it looks like we'll be moving into an old Craftsman
bungalow (rental) that has old windows that open outwards, and no frame
for screens.

Will it really come down to "let the cats out" or "never open the
windows?" Does anybody have any bright ideas that I'm missing? Or a
persuasive argument why I'm getting concerned about nothing? We like
fresh air, but we also love our cats and wouldn't mind having them for
another 15 years...

Urgh...

Thanks for any replies!

Andrew

223rem
February 9th 06, 08:08 AM
It all depends on where your house is located. If you're not too close to busy
highways, you should allow your cats to go out. I have 3 cats and they go out whenever
they want (through a permanently open window). They are very happy cats. You can
see the joy on their faces when they chase each other on the hillside
behind the house.

MaryL
February 9th 06, 08:38 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
>I know the general topic has _certainly_ been addressed here a million
> times, but I'd like to hear some brainstorming on how I can get around
> the problem in my own future situation.
>
> My wife and I have three cats (2-3 years old) that were raised entirely
> as happy, laid-back indoor cats. In a couple months, we should be
> moving, though, and it looks like we'll be moving into an old Craftsman
> bungalow (rental) that has old windows that open outwards, and no frame
> for screens.
>
> Will it really come down to "let the cats out" or "never open the
> windows?" Does anybody have any bright ideas that I'm missing? Or a
> persuasive argument why I'm getting concerned about nothing? We like
> fresh air, but we also love our cats and wouldn't mind having them for
> another 15 years...
>
> Urgh...
>
> Thanks for any replies!
>
> Andrew
>

I prefer to keep my cats indoors. They are happy, and I think they are far
safer. That said, I understand your desire for fresh air. Is there any way
you could mount temporary screening on the *inside* of a couple of the
windows to permit cross-ventilation and yet keep your kitties safe?

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e
Recent pics: http://tinyurl.com/clal7

-L.
February 9th 06, 11:57 AM
wrote:
> I know the general topic has _certainly_ been addressed here a million
> times, but I'd like to hear some brainstorming on how I can get around
> the problem in my own future situation.
>
> My wife and I have three cats (2-3 years old) that were raised entirely
> as happy, laid-back indoor cats. In a couple months, we should be
> moving, though, and it looks like we'll be moving into an old Craftsman
> bungalow (rental) that has old windows that open outwards, and no frame
> for screens.
>
> Will it really come down to "let the cats out" or "never open the
> windows?" Does anybody have any bright ideas that I'm missing? Or a
> persuasive argument why I'm getting concerned about nothing? We like
> fresh air, but we also love our cats and wouldn't mind having them for
> another 15 years...
>
> Urgh...
>
> Thanks for any replies!
>
> Andrew

Figure out a way to put up some screens. We have "open" windows in our
formal living and dining rooms that open out, without screens. I place
a child's security gate (pressure-secured kind) across the openings,
and open the windows part-way.

-L.

Ryan Robbins
February 9th 06, 12:26 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> Will it really come down to "let the cats out" or "never open the
> windows?"

If there aren't any screens available and you can't make any yourself,
you're going to have to do without the fresh air. It's a small price to pay
in exchange for healthy cats.

Ryan Robbins
February 9th 06, 12:27 PM
"223rem" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s21...
> It all depends on where your house is located. If you're not too close to
> busy
> highways, you should allow your cats to go out.

Hogwash.

Joe Canuck
February 9th 06, 02:49 PM
wrote:
> I know the general topic has _certainly_ been addressed here a million
> times, but I'd like to hear some brainstorming on how I can get around
> the problem in my own future situation.
>
> My wife and I have three cats (2-3 years old) that were raised entirely
> as happy, laid-back indoor cats. In a couple months, we should be
> moving, though, and it looks like we'll be moving into an old Craftsman
> bungalow (rental) that has old windows that open outwards, and no frame
> for screens.
>
> Will it really come down to "let the cats out" or "never open the
> windows?" Does anybody have any bright ideas that I'm missing? Or a
> persuasive argument why I'm getting concerned about nothing? We like
> fresh air, but we also love our cats and wouldn't mind having them for
> another 15 years...
>
> Urgh...
>
> Thanks for any replies!
>
> Andrew
>

Arrange for screening for the windows.

LMR via CatKB.com
February 9th 06, 05:12 PM
>It all depends on where your house is located. If you're not too close to busy
>highways, you should allow your cats to go out.

Wrong! Cats do *not* just get hit by cars on busy highways! I've seen
several dead ones on the side of roads that are not highways. One of mine
was killed this way when I was a child - I did not live on a highway.
There's also more tragedies that can happen to a cat outside, such as:
- come into contact with cats carrying various viruses, such as FeLeuk, FIV,
FIP, distemper (raccoons are carriers of this too) and rabies. Vaccines do
*not* guarantee your pet won't contact these diseases
- be killed by dog(s) - this has happened to several cats in my city
- meet up with some sick creep who takes pleasure in hurting cats or
neighbours who are sick & tired of them digging & pooping in their garden up
and trap them to bring to Animal Control
- eating raw meat - birds and mice can cause worm infestation and
toxoplasmosis
- cat collectors - yes, they have been known to take people's pets, not just
strays


LMR

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200602/1

February 9th 06, 07:27 PM
Many Craftsman bungalows had open-out casement windows. The 1905
bungalow I lived in had screens mounted inside the windows. The crank
mechanism passed through a hole in the screen frame, which was sized to
fit within the window opening. You might find a carpenter who could
frame the inside part of the window and install screens in a similar
fashion. You might also check our forum on the American Bungalow
magazine website, ambungalow.com, for other suggestions.

Good luck.

John Luke
Editor, American Bungalow

wrote:
> I know the general topic has _certainly_ been addressed here a million
> times, but I'd like to hear some brainstorming on how I can get around
> the problem in my own future situation.
>
> My wife and I have three cats (2-3 years old) that were raised entirely
> as happy, laid-back indoor cats. In a couple months, we should be
> moving, though, and it looks like we'll be moving into an old Craftsman
> bungalow (rental) that has old windows that open outwards, and no frame
> for screens.
>
> Will it really come down to "let the cats out" or "never open the
> windows?" Does anybody have any bright ideas that I'm missing? Or a
> persuasive argument why I'm getting concerned about nothing? We like
> fresh air, but we also love our cats and wouldn't mind having them for
> another 15 years...
>
> Urgh...
>
> Thanks for any replies!
>
> Andrew

cybercat
February 9th 06, 07:28 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> I know the general topic has _certainly_ been addressed here a million
> times, but I'd like to hear some brainstorming on how I can get around
> the problem in my own future situation.
>
> My wife and I have three cats (2-3 years old) that were raised entirely
> as happy, laid-back indoor cats. In a couple months, we should be
> moving, though, and it looks like we'll be moving into an old Craftsman
> bungalow (rental) that has old windows that open outwards, and no frame
> for screens.
>
> Will it really come down to "let the cats out" or "never open the
> windows?" Does anybody have any bright ideas that I'm missing? Or a
> persuasive argument why I'm getting concerned about nothing? We like
> fresh air, but we also love our cats and wouldn't mind having them for
> another 15 years...
>
> Urgh...
>
> Thanks for any replies!
>

Andrew--you know the answer. You need to be talking to a window or
screen specialist. Chances are excellent that you will wind up with dead
cats if you allow all-indoor cats to roam after spending their entire lives
indoors. They are only windows, for heaven's sake. I feel sure a screening
system can be devised. I mean, hell, do you want birds and bugs and stuff
in your house? Eyeeewww.

February 10th 06, 06:37 PM
Wow. Well thanks to all of you for your replies. Your conclusions
seem pretty decisive: *if* I open the windows, figure out some way to
keep the cats inside of them. I'm sure that's what I'll do.

Thanks for your input!

Claude V. Lucas
February 10th 06, 06:46 PM
In article . com>,
> wrote:
>Wow. Well thanks to all of you for your replies. Your conclusions
>seem pretty decisive: *if* I open the windows, figure out some way to
>keep the cats inside of them. I'm sure that's what I'll do.
>
>Thanks for your input!
>

One more data point is that your cats might not even
want to go outside. Bubba the Maine Coon won't go out
the door for anything. I can barely coax him out to sit
with me on the patio. If I pick him up and carry him out
he'll look around a bit and then head back inside.

I think he had a bad experience the last time he was
out that landed him in the shelter, where I found him.


Claude

Alison
February 12th 06, 08:53 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> I know the general topic has _certainly_ been addressed here a million
> times, but I'd like to hear some brainstorming on how I can get around
> the problem in my own future situation.
>
> My wife and I have three cats (2-3 years old) that were raised entirely
> as happy, laid-back indoor cats. In a couple months, we should be
> moving, though, and it looks like we'll be moving into an old Craftsman
> bungalow (rental) that has old windows that open outwards, and no frame
> for screens.
> >
> Thanks for any replies!
>
> Andrew>>>

You can fence off all or part of your garden so you cats can't escape
with something like Friendly fencing.
Alison

---MIKE---
February 14th 06, 12:28 AM
I saw a friend today and inquired how their cat "Annie" (a small tuxedo
cat) was. They told me Annie was gone. She was an inside/outside cat
and they believe she got caught by a bobcat. So sad.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')