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February 9th 06, 09:58 PM
I'm caring for a friend's cat for a couple of weeks. I've noticed the
telltale "rice grains" around the cat's backside before, but didn't
know what it was. Clearly my friend didn't know either or else I
wouldn't have to post tis message. Anyway, last night, after using the
litterbox there was a long (around 6 inches) string hanging from the
cat's anus -- turns out it had begun passing a tapeworm and the length
of it was just dangling there, exposed. After an emergency midnight
run to the vet, he's been given de-worming medication.

A couple of questions for the experts here...
1) Has anybody else encountered this? My wife and I were seriously
freaked out when we saw this thing. We honestly didn't know if it was
a piece of string, a worm, or part of the poor beast's intestine coming
out. :(

2) How long does the anti-tapeworm medication typically take to destroy
tapeworms living in the digestive system? Is it quick enough that
there is little chance of this happening again?

3) Is there any chance my cat could be infected? They've only been
together a couple of days, my cat *never* goes outside, and my friend's
cat has no sign of fleas or any other parasite carrier.

Thanks in advance for your help!

mlbriggs
February 9th 06, 10:39 PM
On Thu, 09 Feb 2006 13:58:53 -0800, tom.merrall wrote:

> I'm caring for a friend's cat for a couple of weeks. I've noticed the
> telltale "rice grains" around the cat's backside before, but didn't
> know what it was. Clearly my friend didn't know either or else I
> wouldn't have to post tis message. Anyway, last night, after using the
> litterbox there was a long (around 6 inches) string hanging from the
> cat's anus -- turns out it had begun passing a tapeworm and the length
> of it was just dangling there, exposed. After an emergency midnight
> run to the vet, he's been given de-worming medication.
>
> A couple of questions for the experts here...
> 1) Has anybody else encountered this? My wife and I were seriously
> freaked out when we saw this thing. We honestly didn't know if it was
> a piece of string, a worm, or part of the poor beast's intestine coming
> out. :(
>
> 2) How long does the anti-tapeworm medication typically take to destroy
> tapeworms living in the digestive system? Is it quick enough that
> there is little chance of this happening again?
>
> 3) Is there any chance my cat could be infected? They've only been
> together a couple of days, my cat *never* goes outside, and my friend's
> cat has no sign of fleas or any other parasite carrier.
>
> Thanks in advance for your help!


There is a lot of information on the net about tapeworms -- too many for
me to include. Just type in "tape worms" or "cat tapeworms" and you will
find a bunch. I've had no personal experience with worms in cats. Good
luck. MLB

February 9th 06, 10:42 PM
Well, I've googled the heck out of this topic, and about all I can find
is the phrase, "very rarely whole tapeworms can be passed". If anyone
has more details, I'd be grateful!

Wendy
February 10th 06, 12:07 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> Well, I've googled the heck out of this topic, and about all I can find
> is the phrase, "very rarely whole tapeworms can be passed". If anyone
> has more details, I'd be grateful!
>

I've never had one pass that way but have had a cat barf one up. It was
fortuitous as I was in the middle of fighting with the vet to get tape worm
medicine. They wouldn't give me any for the cat because they weren't finding
segments in the stool. Once she barfed the worm, I marched it up to the vet,
made them look at it (gag!) and never had any problem getting meds for
tapeworm after that.

I don't know how long the medicine takes to kill the worm but I wouldn't be
overly concerned about running into one in the near future. They don't often
pass the entire worm like that. Tell your friend to be on the look out for
rice like segment being shed from the anus and get meds for the cat as soon
as any of them are found around.

Your cat cannot catch a tapeworm from another cat. They are acquired by
eating fleas or rodents.

Wendy

John Doe
February 10th 06, 01:04 AM
wrote:

>
> 3) Is there any chance my cat could be infected? They've only
> been together a couple of days, my cat *never* goes outside, and
> my friend's cat has no sign of fleas or any other parasite
> carrier.

All you have to do is examine its feces from time to time. A
flashlight helps. Gently coax your cat away from the litter box
after it goes. (Always exercise gentleness when interacting with
your cats around the litter box.)

Rhonda
February 10th 06, 06:27 AM
I've never heard of one passed whole -- that would freak me out too!
That was very good of you to run the cat to the emergency vet. Your
cat-sitting bill to your friend should just about quadruple...

I wonder if the worm died on its own and that's why it came out? That's
just a guess.

We took in a stray cat years ago and it took us a long time to get rid
of her tapeworms. One pill usually does it, but she kept getting them
again every couple of months. The vet thought that maybe we just weren't
killing the original worm. It took about 3 or so doses before she was
worm-free (and she never got them again.)

Good luck with your friend's cat.

Rhonda

wrote:

> Anyway, last night, after using the
> litterbox there was a long (around 6 inches) string hanging from the
> cat's anus -- turns out it had begun passing a tapeworm and the length
> of it was just dangling there, exposed. After an emergency midnight
> run to the vet, he's been given de-worming medication.

MaryL
February 10th 06, 07:01 AM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> I'm caring for a friend's cat for a couple of weeks. I've noticed the
> telltale "rice grains" around the cat's backside before, but didn't
> know what it was. Clearly my friend didn't know either or else I
> wouldn't have to post tis message. Anyway, last night, after using the
> litterbox there was a long (around 6 inches) string hanging from the
> cat's anus -- turns out it had begun passing a tapeworm and the length
> of it was just dangling there, exposed. After an emergency midnight
> run to the vet, he's been given de-worming medication.
>
> A couple of questions for the experts here...
> 1) Has anybody else encountered this? My wife and I were seriously
> freaked out when we saw this thing. We honestly didn't know if it was
> a piece of string, a worm, or part of the poor beast's intestine coming
> out. :(
>
> 2) How long does the anti-tapeworm medication typically take to destroy
> tapeworms living in the digestive system? Is it quick enough that
> there is little chance of this happening again?
>
> 3) Is there any chance my cat could be infected? They've only been
> together a couple of days, my cat *never* goes outside, and my friend's
> cat has no sign of fleas or any other parasite carrier.
>
> Thanks in advance for your help!
>

Here is a page you might want to read:
http://www.sniksnak.com/cathealth/tapeworms.html
One paragraph notes that a tapeworm will sometimes release its attachment in
the intestines and migrate to the stomach. What that happens, the cat may
throw up a tapeworm that is several inches in length. I remember seeing
something like this from our family dog when I was a child. It was so gross
that I still have a vivid memory of it. I realize that you were talking
about the "other end" of your cat, and that also will occasionally occur.
Many times, you will find it almost impossible to detect a tapeworm
infestation because the most common sign is small segments that may resemble
grains of rice or sesame seeds. These can be difficult to see if the cat's
fur is light in color. I always take fecal samples to the vet for my cats'
routine exams even though there have been no signs of worms from shortly
after I adopted Holly 10+ years ago. Incidentally, sometimes even a
microscopic examination of the feces will fail to detect the presence of
tapeworm. Fortunately, this is not a medical emergency.

Here is another site that describes different stages and different types of
tapeworm:
http://www.communityah.com/feline/Tapeworm-Infection.htm

If I had a cat with tapeworm, I would treat *both* cats because they live in
the same environment. Tapeworms are not "contagious." They occur when a
cat swallows a flea, which serves as the intermediate host, but I think it
is likely that the same thing could occur with other cats in the same
household.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e

-L.
February 10th 06, 07:27 AM
wrote:
> Well, I've googled the heck out of this topic, and about all I can find
> is the phrase, "very rarely whole tapeworms can be passed". If anyone
> has more details, I'd be grateful!

Yes, they can be passed whole - usually it's a sign that the
infestation is pretty bad. Did you get oral meds or an injection? The
oral meds need to be repeated in a couple of weeks - usually the
injection does not, but sometimes does in cases of heavy infestation.
I would continue to monitor the cat to see if he is still passing
segments (which contain eggs). Yes, your cat is at risk for tapes
because the segments have been in the environment and he could have
easily ingested the eggs. I would call your vet, explain what happened
and see if you can just pick up some meds to ensure your cat doesn't
get a full-blown case (assuming your cat has been seen in the last year
and is in good health, most vets will do this).

Tapes usually run hand-in-hand with fleas. If either cat has fleas you
need to iradicate them as well, or the cats will continually be
infested with tapes.

Good luck!

-L.

JJ
February 11th 06, 01:17 AM
This cat may be infected with more than one type of parasite - Could
have Round worms - poor kitty needs to see Vet - soon - needs a full
fecal exam to determine what it has, poor baby.

whayface
February 11th 06, 01:32 PM
On 10 Feb 2006 17:17:01 -0800, "JJ" > wrote:

>This cat may be infected with more than one type of parasite - Could
>have Round worms - poor kitty needs to see Vet - soon - needs a full
>fecal exam to determine what it has, poor baby.


I concur with JJ. Some things are best taken care of by vet.


My babies
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